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SCHUYLKILL 
COUNTY 

PENNSYLVANIA 

Gehealogy  — Family  History  — Biography 


Containing  Historical  Sketches  of  Old  Families  and  of 

Representative  and  Prominent  Citizens 

Past  and  Present 


IN  TWO  VOLUMES 


ILLUSTRATED 


VOLUME  II 


CHICAGO 

J.  H.  BEERS  &  COMPANY 

1916 


i 


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•  :     !  :. 


»  .  ;   *    ••    • 

••   •••   •    •   "• 

*     •  •  •  •  t    • 


Li 


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INDEX 


Achenbach  Family 759 

Aehenjbach,  Gregory    759 

Acker,  Mrs.  Esther  A 931 

Acker  Family   930 

Acker,  William  8 930 

Adam    (Adams)   Families 

104,  221,  983,  1192 

Adam,  Oeorffe  B 983 

Adams  Family   104,  221 

Adams,  Frank .1192 

Adams,  George 105 

Adams,  John  H 107 

Adams,  Bobert  W 107 

AdamsoD  Family   247 

Adamson,  William  B 247 

Albright  Families   96,  731,  806 

Albright,  Hiester  S 96 

Allen,  Charles  F 268 

Allen,  Lucian  H 268 

Alspach,  Charles  P 317 

Alspach  Family 317 

Andreas  FamHy  393 

Andreas,  Owen  A 393 

Angst  Family  251 

Angst,  John  H 251 

Annimciation  Church,  Shenandoah 1151 

Archbald  Family   35 

Archbald,  Col.  James,  Jr 35 

Aregood,  Isaiah   592 

Aregood,  Ossman  J 593 

Aregood,   Samuel  C 592 

Amdt  Family  415 

Artz,  Elmer  E 1032 

Artz  Family  1032 

Atkins,  Charles  M 1 

Auchmuty,  J.  E.,  M.  D 452 

Bachert,  Elias   475 

Bachert  Families 438,  475,  659,  818 

Bachert,  William  1 658 

Bachman  Family   456 

Bachman,  Samuel  456 

Baer  (Barr)  Families 565,  990,  1011 

Baer,  Reuben 517 

Bailey  Family 383 

Bailey,  Samuel  S 383 

Bair,  Cyrus  W 665 

Baldinger,  Albert  690 

Balliet  Family   354 

Balliet,   Tilghman   S 354 

Bannan,  B^jamin   163 

Bannan,  Francis  B 609 

Bannan,  John   609 


Bannan,  Miss  Martha  B. 610 

Bannan,  Thomas  B 610 

Bare  Family  565 

Barket,  Solomon  A 719 

Barlow,  Ephraim  552 

Barlow,  Nathan   552 

Barr,  Edward  1011 

Barr  (Baer)  Families 990,  1011 

Barr,  Milton  990 

/  Basler,  Mrs.  Mary  C 566 

Basler,  William  566 

Bast  Family   496 

Bast,  Jeremiah  F 496 

Bast,  Oliver  0 498 

Batten,  George 1171 

Batten,  Shadrach 1171 

Baum,  Earl  D 821 

Baum  Family   821 

Bauscher,  David 409 

BauBcher  Family  410 

Bausum  Family   633 

Bausum,  Frank  W 633 

Bayer  Family  381 

Baver,  Franklin  D 381 

Beatty,  George  H 869 

Bechtel,  Edgar  W 188 

Bechtel  Family   2,  188 

Beehtel,  Francis  W 188 

Bechtel,  Judge  O.  P 2 

Beck,  C.  Lester 1092 

Beck,  Edward  F 1087 

Beck  Families 

100,  466,  1087,  1092,  1141,  1162 

Beck,  George   1076 

Beck,  Isaac  G 100 

Becker  Family   326 

Becker,  Irwin  H 326 

Becker,  William   999 

Behler,  Anthony   828 

Behler  Family    904 

Behler,  Samuel  B 904 

Behney  Family  635 

Behney,  Prof.  George  A 635 

Bell  Family 533 

Bell,  James  J 533 

Bendrick,  Mrs.  Helen 573 

Bendrick,  Joseph    572 

Ben-Salem   Church    (Reformed) 426 

Bensinger,  Charles  S 516 

Bensinger  Families 404,  516,   730,  937 

Bensinger,  Frank  L 730 

Bensinger,  William   F 937 

Bergan,  William    973 

••• 

111 


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IV 


SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


Berger   Family    58,  777 

Berger,  John   D 57 

Berger,  William   538 

Berk  Familv   636 

\  Berkj  John  K.,  M.  D 636 

Berkheiser  Family   544 

Berkheiser,  Arthur  J.,  M.  D 544 

Bemey,,  Timothy  F 683 

Berrett,  George  899 

Betz,  Peter   671 

Bevan,  John   1019 

Beyeridge,  David  1027 

Bicht,  William  F 1099 

•Bierstein  (Birston),  Pius  W 1169 

Billig,   William   827 

BiUman' Family    888 

Birch,  Mrs.  Margaret  D 63 

Birston  (Bierstein),  Pius  W 1169 

Bischoff ,  Conrad 357 

Bischo£f,  William  C 358 

Bittle,  Charles  H 473 

Bittle   Families 234, 

318,  329,  473,  525,  588 

Bittle,  Isaac  C 588 

Bittle,  John  C 233 

Bittle,  Marcus   318 

Bittle,  Oliver  A 525 

Bittle,  Mrs.  Rosa 320 

Bittle,  Samuel  B 329 

Bittner  Family 906 

Bixler,  Irvin  H 1055 

Bleiler  Family    995 

Bleiler,  Thomas  F 995 

Bobbin,  John  J 861 

Boczkowski,   William   D 348 

Boden  Family   89 

Boe,  Joseph  E 691 

Robch  Families 411,  618,  851 

Bolich,  Herman  A 852 

Bolich,   Louis  C 851 

Bolton,  George  W 900 

Boltz  Family 548 

Boltz,  Jacob    548 

Bond,  Miss  Emily 764 

Bond,  George   763 

Boner,  Mrs.  Alice  M 1198 

Boner,  Ambrose  1197 

Boner  Family   1197 

Borbach,  Charles  C 494 

Borlace  Family 1134 

Bosch,  Joseph  C 1214 

Bosche,  Frank   1084 

Boughter,   Ezra   J 1038 

Bowen,  Charles  K 695 

Bowen  Families  695,  1066 

Bowers,  Walter  G.,  M.  D 639 

Bowman  Families 194,  1178 

Bowman,  George  F 1178 

Bowman,  Peter   195 

Boyer  Families 176,  421,  725,  1047 

Boyer,  John  O.  J 725 

Brachman  Famdies   797,  1034 

Brachman,  Frederick  W 796 

Brachman,  Harry  J 1033 

Brady,  Michael  J 413 


Braun   (Brown)   Families 768, 

1072,   1096,   1103 

Braun,  Robert  C 768 

Breen,  Joseph  1069 

Breen,  Patrick  1069 

Breisch  Families  803,  1160 

Brennan,  Hon.  James  E 568 

Brennan,  Michael  R 1025 

Brobst,  Edward  C 230 

Brobst  Family  230 

Brode  Family   254 

Brode,  Samuel   254 

Brode,  William  256 

Brommer  Family   698 

Brommer,  Manuel  W 698 

Brown,  Adam  J 1103 

Brown,  Charles  T 768 

Brown,  Edwin    152 

Brown   (Braun)   Families 62, 

405,  768,  875,  1096,  1103 

Brown,  Frank 152 

Brown,  George  W 62 

Brown,  Harper  *H .1071 

Brown,  Jacob  F 1000 

Brown,  John  C 405 

Brown,  John  K 63 

Brown,  Walter  E 1096 

Brown,  Warren  G 875 

Brown,  WiUiam  J .1121 

Brown,  William  W ,540 

Brownmiller  Family  726 

Brumm,  Hon.  Charles  N 168 

Bruner  Family   - 115 

Bryant,  Willis  L 162 

Bubeck,  Charles  H 561 

Bubeck,  CJlayton  W 561 

Bubeck,  John  E 560 

Buchsbice,  Mrs.  Dorothy 1028 

Buchsbice,  GottUeb    1028 

Buckley  Family 799 

Buckley,  William  R.,  M.  D 799 

Buck  Run  CoUiery 866 

Buehler,   Francis  J 1020 

Buehler,  Peter   519 

Buehler,  Samuel   519 

BuU,  Jonathan,  Sr 770 

Bull,  Robs  770 

Burke  Brothers    350 

Burke,  Edward  J 184 

Burke  Family   184 

Burke,  James  V 350 

Burke,  Martin  M 182 

Burke,  Patrick  H 183 

Burkhardt,  James    1078 

Burkhart  Family    947 

Burkhart,   Karl  W 947 

Bumham,  Joseph  950 

Bumham,  William  J 950 

Butz  Family   281 

Butz,  George  W 280 

Canfield  Family    847 

Canfleld,  Prof.  Patrick  S 846 

Cardin   Family    1210 

Carl,  Abraham  638 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


Carl,  Mrs.  EUen  M 639 

Carl  Families  95,  837 

Ckri,  Frederick 837 

Carl,  Harry  B 95 

Garmitchell  Family  954 

Carmitchell,  George  B 954 

CfarroU,  Prof.  Charlee 257 

Christeson,  Capt.  Hans  C 689 

Christeson,  Mrs.  Lonisa 689 

Clappier,  Christian  G 342 

Clappier,  Peter  342 

Clauser  Families   749,  898 

Clauser,  Jacob  W 749 

Clay  (Henry)  Monument 610 

Clayton,  Nelson    296 

Clayton,  B.  Bruce 296 

Cleaver,  Jamee  B 77 

Cochran,  Andrew  B 116 

Cochran,  William  A 117 

Coldren,  Darius  D 146 

Coldren  Family   146 

Collins,  James  B 303 

Collins,  Patrick 303 

Conrad,  John  L 344 

Conville  Family   534 

Cook  Family   841 

Coombe,  John  M .- 852 

Coombe  Family  258 

Coombe,  Bichard  258 

Cooper  Family   896 

Cooper,  Prof.  Jonathan  W 896 

Corbe,  August   829 

Crawford,  Mrs.  Alona  B 285 

Crawford,  Andrew  J 284 

Crawford,  Samuel  G 285 

Crosby,  Neil   ^ 838 

CuUen,  John  J 1211 

Cummings,  Pierce  855 

Cummings,  Thomas  J 855 

Curran,  James   , 779 

Daley  Family   823 

Daley,  William  J 822 

Dampman  Family  995 

Dampman,  William  M 994 

Daniel,  Arthur  H 1080 

Danner,  Henry 809 

Darkwater  Colliery   866 

Daubert  Family 601 

Daubert,  William  H 601 

Davis,  E.  F.  C 43 

Davis  Family 585 

Davis,  Mrs.  Ida  H 290 

Davis,  John  H 288 

Davis,  Thomas  D 585 

Davis,  Thomas  J 153 

Dechert,  Daniel,  M.  D 464 

Dechert    Family 464 

Deebel,  John  F 556 

Deebel,  Samuel  555 

Degler  Family    901 

Degler,  Joel  8.. 901 

Deibert,   Allen  J 747 

Deibert,  Charles  V.  B 834 

Deibert,  Daniel   869 


Deibert,  Daniel  D 570 

Deibert  Families  ^ 213, 

576,  663,  677,  747,  834,  869,  1004 

Deibert,  George  B 213 

Deibert,   James  677 

Deibert,  Samuel  J 663 

Deibert,  William  F 1004 

Deisher  Family  426 

Deisher,  John  H 426 

Delaney  Family 858 

Dengler  Family    1048 

Denglef,  Howard   1048 

Derr,  Elias  570 

Derr  Families  570,  670 

Derr,  Gabriel  B 669 

DeSilva,  Mrs.  EUa  B 380 

DeSilva,  John  S 380 

Detweiler  Family   23 

Detwiler  Dr.  Peter  C 23 

Dewald  Families   437,  1029 

Dewald,  Irwin   1029 

Dewald,  Samuel  i 437 

Dewey  Family 961 

Dewey,  Michael  G.,  M.  D 961 

Dief enderf er  Family   535 

Diefenderfer,  Guy  H 536 

Dief  enderf  er,  William  H 535 

Dietrich,  Frank  D 1064 

Dillman  Family  80 

Dillman,  Daniel  D 83 

Dillman,   Daniel   K 82 

Dillman,  D.  Walker 84 

Dinunerling  Family 1062 

Dimmerling,  George  F 1062 

Dinger  Family   667 

Dinger,  Joel  A 735 

Dinger,  Wilson  B 667 

Dirschedl,  Henry  A.,  M.  D 295 

Dirschedl,  Joseph   295 

Ditchey,  Charles  F 1119 

Ditehey,  Jacob  W.. 1119 

Dochney,  William  F 358 

Dodson,  Weston  &  Co 860 

Doebler,  Mrs.  M 490 

Doebler,  William  G 489 

Doherty,  Edward  A 1156 

Doherty  Families 627,  1166 

Doherty,  WiUiam  F 527 

Dohner,  Henry  J 310 

Dolbin  Family   765 

Dolbin,  John  B 765 

Donahoe  Brothers    907 

Donahoe  Families   574,  908 

Donahoe,  Hon.  J.  Wilfred 574 

Donahoe,  Bichard  A 909 

Donahoe,  Thomas  C 908 

Donmoyer  Family  1084 

Donmoyer,  John  W 1084 

Donne,  Daniel 1056 

Donne  Family  1056 

Donohue,  Martin    317 

Donohue,  Michael  M 317 

Dormer,  Martin    964 

Dormer,  Mrs.  Mary 965 

Dombach,  Henry  H 543 


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VI 


SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


Douglass,  Dr.  George 37 

Douglass,  Miss  Baehd  M 37 

Doyle  Family 240 

Doyle,  W.  Francis,  M.  D 240 

Dresher  Family  .623 

Drumheller  Family 512 

Drumheller,  Bert  E 512 

Dumcius,  Bev.  John 300 

Ebbert  Family  505 

Eberly  Family   1102 

Eberly,  William  1101 

Ebert  Families  1037,  1077 

Ebert,  George  W 1077 

Eberts,  Joseph   356 

Ebling  Families  948,  974 

Ebling,  Irvin  A 974 

Ebling,  John  M 948 

Eckert,   Abraham  L 297 

Ehrhart  Family   433 

Ehrhart,  Mrs.  Julia  0 436 

Ehrhart,  William  N^  A.M:,  Ph.D 432 

Eifert  Family 1031 

Eifert,  William  P 1031 

Eiler,  Elwood  T 702 

Filer  Fftmily  884 

Eiler,  Frank  703 

Filer,  John   703 

Eisenhauer,  Samuel  ...» 557 

Eisinger,  Charles  W 816 

Eisinger  Family 816 

Elison,  Alois  1091 

Elison  Family 1109 

Elison,  Peter   1091 

Elliott,  William   174 

Emerich,  Elijah  222 

Emerich  Families 223,  445,  714,  957 

Emerich,  Irvin  W 714 

Emrick  Family 957 

Emrick,  Jonathan  B 957 

English,  EUis  J 1100 

Esterly,  Walter  F 1071 

Evans,  Miss  Annie  S 746 

Evans,  Charles  B 746 

Evans,  Clarence  H 1014 

Evans,  Bev.  David  1 1131 

Evans  Families 86,  801,  978,  1014 

Evans,  Nathan   746 

Evans,  Samuel  J 977 

Evans,  William  D 1191 

Fahl  Families  590,  950 

Fahl,  John  H 590 

Farquhar,  George  W 4 

Farquhar,  Guy  E 4 

Farquhar,  Otto  E 8 

Farrell  Family  775 

Farrell,  Thomas  A 775 

Faust,  Andrew  B 1126 

Faust,  Charles  W 927 

Faust,  Mrs.  Dora  T 309 

Faust  Families. 565,  627,  775,  899,  927, 1126 

Faust,  Mrs.  Bebeeca  B 1127 

Faust,  William  G 308 

Fayhey,  John  B 1190 


Feger,  Jacob    642 

Fegley  Families  298,  807 

Fegley,  Perry  W 298 

Feller,  Levi    1095 

Felty  Famines 1020,  1037 

Fel^,  Ferdinand  1037 

Felty,  John  H 1020 

Fenkner  Family 915 

Fenton  Family  684 

Fenton,  Ivor  D.,  M.  D 684 

Ferguson,  Anthony   980 

Ferguson,  Christopher  P 57 

Ferguson,  Daniel  J 56 

Ferguson  Families 50,  980 

Ferguson,  Patrick  J 50 

Fertig  Family  396 

Fertig,  John    396 

Fesig,  Samuel  M 850^ 

Fessler   Families 351,  708 

Fessler,  Harry  G 351 

Fessler,  Jeremiah  708 

Fetterolf  Family  826 

Fetterolf,  Peter  826 

Fidler  Family  445 

Filbert  FamiUes 11,  177,  248 

Filbert,  John  Harry 248 

Filbert,  Maj.  Peter  A 177 

Filbert,  Peter  K.,  D.  D.  S 11 

Filer,  Elisha,  Jr 760 

Fisher,  C.  Arthur 291 

Fisher  Family 291 

Fister  Family 600 

Fister,  James  H 695 

Fleming,  William  C 1106 

Flexer  Family   392 

Flynn  Family  389 

Flynn,  John  J 389 

Foley,  James 1211 

Ford,  Edwin   889 

Foster,  Thomas  165 

Foyle,  Martin  E 1204 

Frack,  Daniel  77 

Franey,  James  J 1146 

Franey,  Martin 1146 

Frantz,  Christian 1180 

Freeman  Family  709 

Freeman,  John  W 709 

Freese,  William  F 945 

Freudenberger,  Fred  D , . . .  399 

Fritz,  Martin   773 

Fryer,  Daniel  C 1081 

Fuhrman  Family   622 

Fuhrman,  William  F 621 

Gabbert,  Christ  F 980 

Gable  Families .1033,  1056 

Gable,  Harry  P 1055 

Gable,  Henry  E...'. 1033 

Gane,  Uriah   450 

Gane,  William  U 450 

Gangloff  Family 878 

Gangloff,  Bev.  William 877 

Garis,   Thomas    925 

Garrett  Family    963 

Gazdzik,  Father  Joseph 495 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


Vll 


Gehrig,  B.  Frank 1194 

Gehrig  Families 712,  1194 

(Jehrig,   J.   Franklin .712 

Geiger,  Miss  Augusta 891 

Geiger  Family  562 

Geiger,  Jeremiah  D 562 

Geiger,  William 891 

Geist,  A.  Ftank , 664 

Geist  Family  664 

Gensemer  Family  235 

Gensemer,  Daniel  J 235 

Gerber  Families 378,  461,  493,  649 

Gerber,  William  H 493 

Gerhard,  Charles  99 

Gerhard  Families 443,  485,  717,  903 

Gerhard,  Frank   443 

Gerhard,  Prof.  Frederic 99 

Gerhard,  Henry  Y -. 485 

Gerhard,  William  F 717 

Gibbons  Family   1123 

Gilgour,  George  309 

Ginther,  George  C 455 

Ginther,  John  B 596 

Glunz,  Bernard 436 

Glunz,  Clement  B 436 

Goho  Family   482 

Golden,  Thomas  B 713 

Gore  Family   412 

Gore,  Mrs.  Mary  E 413 

Gore,   Samuel  H 412 

Gorman,  Joseph  H 125 

Gorman,  Miss  Julia  T 125 

Gorman,  Thomas  124 

Gowen,  Franklin  Benjamin 171 

Gray  Family   272,  341 

Gray,  James  C,  M.  D 272 

Gray,  John  M.,  M.  D 341 

Green,  Thomas   1058 

Greenawald,  Daniel  A 374 

Greenawald   (Greenawalt)   Families.... 

374,  597 

Greenawalt,  Moses  S 597 

Gregory,  John 800 

GrieflP,  Elmer  D 506 

Grieff  Families  313,  506 

Grieff,  William  A 313 

Grosser,  Edward  W 375 

Grosser,  George  375 

Grosskettler,  Eberhard  C. 1183 

Grosskettler  Family.  .1139,  1181,  1183,  1204 

Grosskettler,  John 1204 

Grosskettler,  Joseph 1139 

Grube,  Charles  W 981 

Grube,  Ernest 750 

Gnibe  Families 751,  817,  981 

Grube,  Lewis  J 817 

Grumm,  Frederick  L 885 

Haber,  WilHam  356 

Haeseler,  Dr.  Charles  H 532 

Haeseler  Family  531 

Haeseler,  Frederick  155 

Hafer  Family  794 

Hafer,  Jared 794 

Hagner,  William   488 


Hamilton,  WilUam  T 220 

Hand  Families 856,  1059,  1063 

Hand,  Ira  W 1059 

Hand,  James  Monroe 856 

Hand,  John  F 1063 

Hand,  William  E 856 

Hanney,  Edward  J 779 

Hanney,  John  F 778 

Hannum,  Mrs.  A.  J 285 

Hannum,  John  T 285 

Harlor,  Thomas    1067 

Harris  Family   262 

Harris,  John  M 261 

Harris,  Bobert 262 

Harron,  Eobert 784 

Hartenstein,  Peter  340 

Hartman,  Simon   763 

Hartung  Family   407 

Hartung,  Thomas 952 

Hause  Family  154 

Hause,  Frederick  H 1^ 

Haverty,  Peter  F 1153 

Hawkins,  Claude  H 499 

Hawkins  Family   499 

Header,  Monroe   1025 

Heberling,  John  F 1201 

Hede  Family  811 

Hede,  John  J 811 

Hehn,   Alfred    722 

Hehn  FamUy  72^ 

Heim   (Hime)  Families.  .228,  408,  522,  748 

Heim,  Lyman  D.^.  D 228 

Heine,  Francis  W j  683 

Heine,  Michael  H 537 

Heine,  Solomon    538,  583 

Heiser  Family 926 

Henry  Family 414 

Henry,  Wilson   414 

Hensyl  Family   407 

Hensyl,  George  8.,  M.  D 407 

Hepler  Family    753 

Hepler,  -Bev.  Henry 753 

Herbein,  H.  J.,  D.  D.  S 624 

Hermany,  Phaon,  M.  D 610 

Hess,  Adam 825 

Hess,  Jacob  A 1107 

Hess,  Lambert  463 

Hessinger  Family   1008 

Hessinger,  Howard  W 1008 

Higgins,  Patrick  T 1195 

Hikes  Family  848 

Hikes,  Morris  W 848 

Hill,  David  K 893 

HUl  Family 893 

Hillanbrand,  Charles  L 608 

Hime  (Heim)  Families. .. 228,  408,  522,  748 

Hime,  Jacob  F 522 

Hinkel  Family  472 

Hinkel,  WUliam  H.,  M.  D 471 

Hoak,  Peter   1109 

Hobart,  John  Potts 44 

Hobart,  Nathaniel  P 45 

Hock,  Conrad,  Sr 605 

Hock,  Conrad  K 605 

Hoch  Family   1054 


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Hoch,  Harry  B 1054 

Hoepstine  Family  505 

Hoepstine,  James  W 505 

Hoff  Family ^ 252 

Hoff,  William.  Jr 252 

Hoffman  Family 521 

Hoffman,  Miss  Maud  E 814 

Hoffman,  Peter  L 813 

Hoffman,  Eobert  J 520 

Holderman,  Mrs.  A 721 

Holderman,  Carl  F 720 

Holland,  David  A.,  M.  D 595 

Holshue,  Josiah 570 

Holtgreve,  Rev.  Francis  P 1193 

Holy  Family  Church,  Shenandoah 1193 

Honsberger,  Jacob  S 1085 

Honsberger,  William  H 1085 

Hooper,  Mrs.  Mary  J 782 

Hooper,  Robert  W.  C 782 

Hopkins,  Richard  W 1022 

Hoppes,  Charles  H 934 

Hoppes  Families  467,  934 

Hoppes,  Joseph  S 467 

Horn   Families    641,  805 

Horn,  George  B.  McClellan 805 

Horn,  Mrs.  Hattie 806 

Horn,   William  • 641 

Houser,  Daniel 740,  741 

Houser  Family 809 

Houtz  Families 422,  425,  1193 

Houtz,  Rev.  Harry  D.,  A.  M 421 

Hoy  Families  201,  389 

Hoy,  Pancoast  T 201 

Huber,  Andrew  W 776 

Huber  Family 776,  1049 

Huber,  lorman  A 1049 

Hubler  Family   84 

Hughes,  David  C 1026 

Hughes,  David  G 987 

Hughes,  Francis  Wade 41 

Huling,  J.  W 1201 

HuUihan,  John   * . . .  1199 

Hummel,  Engelhart  753 

Hummel,  Frank  J 752 

Hunter,  Alexander  1050 

Huntsinger  Family    1039 

Huntsinger,  John  E 1039 

Iffert,  John    772 

Imschweiler,    Lorenz 275 

James,  Benjamin  F 736 

James  Family    736 

Jenkins,  Frederick  C 176 

Jenkins,  Gething 514 

Jones,  David  1104 

Kaier,  Charles  D 165 

Kaier,  Charles  F 168 

Kalbach  Family   638 

Kaminsky,  Rev.  A.  V 927 

Kane,  John   1068 

Kane,  John  F 1068 

Kanter,  Franklin   484 

Kauffman  Family  867 


Kaufman,  Alexander 731 

Kaufman,  Charles  M 186 

Kaufman  Families  186,  731 

Kaup  Family  676 

Kaup,  William  W 676 

Kear,  Albert  8 138 

Kear,  Charles  R 137 

Kear,  Edward  G 138 

Kear  Family  134 

Kear,  Frank  G 139 

Kear,  Harrison  A 139 

Kear,  Mrs.  Mary  B 138 

Kear,  Mrs.  Sarah 137 

Kear,  William   136 

Keefer,  Andrew   ^  286 

Keefer  FamUy   1154 

Keefer,  Harry 1154 

Kehler  Family    655 

Kehler,  Henry  C 655 

Keilman  Family  764 

Keilman,  John  H 764 

Keith,  Elvin  W.,  M.  D 698 

Keiser,  G.  M 213 

Keiser,  William 1188 

Keiter,  Samuel   206 

Kemner,  Matthias   347 

Kepner  Family 352 

Kepner,  Mrs.  Ellnora 354 

Kepner,  W.  Clinton 352 

Kerkeslager  Family   149 

Kershner  Family   593 

Kershner,  John  U 593 

Kilgus,  Jacob   537 

Killian,  Joseph  883 

Killian  Family   883 

Kimmel,  Andrew  S 270 

Kimmel  Family 271 

Kistler,  Albert  S 458 

Kistler,  Alvin   646 

Kistler,  Charles  S 1141 

Kistler  Families. .  .458,  646,  936,  1095,  1141 

Klase,  Edward   755 

Kleber  Family   732 

Kleckner  Family    994 

Kleckner,  Samuel   994 

Kline,  Adolph 1120 

Kline,  Mrs.  Caroline 829 

Kline,  G.  Edgar 710 

Kline  Families 711,  941 

Kline,  Harry  P 941 

Kline,  Rev.  Jacob 270 

Kli^e,  Jeremiah  269 

Kline,  Robert  E 828 

Klingaman  Family  471 

Klinger   Family    1036 

Klinger,  Lewis  A 1036 

Knapp,  Alanson   452 

Knapp,  Charles  L 1199 

Knapp  Families 452,  1199 

Knapp,  Joseph  P 1199 

Knauber,    Henry    1022 

Knecht,  William  F 607 

Knepper  Family 887 

Knepper,  Harry   887 

Knipe,  Oscar   252 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


IX 


KnitUe,  George  F 976 

Knoedler,  Gottfried 1006 

Koch,  Albert  G 891 

Koch  FamUies. .  .16,  419,  617,  891,  917,  976 

Koch,  Jacob  M 419 

Koch,  Hon.  Bichard  H 16 

Koch,  Salem  W 617 

Koch,  Walter  M 917 

Koenig  Family  971 

Koenig,  Samuel   971 

Koerper,  Harry  H 222 

Kolbe,  Henry • 539 

Kopp  Family   652 

Kopp,  John  G.,  Sr 652 

Kramer  Family  ^ .  382 

Krammes,  Charles  H 700 

Krammes  Family    701 

Krapf,  Richard 1213 

Kraus  Family 667 

Kraus,  Henry  W 667 

Kraus^  Family   788 

KrausSy  Kev.  Howard  H 787 

Krebs  Family   282 

Kreis,  Henry  C 766 

Krell,  John   1060 

Krell,  George  822 

Krell,  P.  Philip 822 

Kressley,  Rev.  Clement  D.,  A.  M 586 

Kressley  Family 586 

Kreitzer,  George  D 1114 

Kripplebaur,  Peter  886 

Kuebler,  Henry  Z 845 

KuU,  C.  Fred ^ 334 

Kunkel  Families   744,  965  • 

Kunkel,  Jonas  965 

Lally,  Anthony  B 591 

Lally  Family   591 

Lamberson,  Amos  B 756 

Landemann,  Henry   ^ 785 

Landenberger,  Harold  L 1216 

Lattimore  Family  657 

Lattimore,  Harry  D 657 

Laubenstein  Family    612 

Laubenstein,  Frank  J 612 

Laubenstein  Mfg.  Co 613 

Laudeman,  Jacob 909 

Laudig  Families   563,  679 

Laudig,  Joseph  H 679 

Laudig,  William  F 563 

Lautenbacher,  Charles   142,  693 

Lautenbacher,  Irvin  L 693 

Lautenbacher,  Jeremiah  C 142 

Lcaman,  Mrs.  Ida  L.  W 267 

Lebo,  John   841 

Lecher  Family    960 

Lecher,  William  E 960 

Lehr,  John    1045 

Leibig,  Benjamin  F 1017 

Leibig  Family  1017 

Leiby  Families   442,  660 

Leiser  Family 973 

Lengel  Family  715 

Lengel,  John  H 715 

Leonard,  John 321 


Leonard,  Mrs.  Mary  A 322 

Leonhardt,  Henry  756 

Lesher  Families 243,  1042 

Lesher,  Felix  H 1042 

Levan  Family  79 

Levan,.  Richard  K 79 

Lime,  John  H 462 

Lindenmuth  Families 

483,  622,  843,  1124,  1168 

Lindenmuth,  George  Clarence 843 

Linder,  Burd  B ', 373 

Linder,  E.  Baymond 373 

Linder  Family   372 

Lindermuth  Families 501,  1124 

Lindermuth,  Horace  D 1126 

Lindermuth,  Joseph  . . . . : 1124 

Loch,  Daniel   727 

Loch  Family   727 

Looser,  Christopher,  Esq 632 

Lomas,  Benjamin 1203 

Long,  Charles  F 716 

Lorah  Family 625,  1130 

Lorah,  James  625 

Lord,  Henry  687 

Losch,  Hon.  Samuel  Alfred 128 

Loy  &  Minnig 559 

Loy,  Harry  F 560 

Lucas,  Edwin  918 

Lucas  Family   918 

Lutz,  Bobert  J 359 

Lynch,  Abraham   226 

Lynch,  John  H 877 

Lynch,  John  W 226 

Lytle,  L.  C 1207 

McAndrew,  Thomas  C 600 

McOure,  George  W 227 

McCool,  Rev.  Joseph 98 

McGuire  Family  1019 

McKnight,  J.  J 850 

McNoldy,  Henry 1051 

Machamer,  Oliver   1000 

Madara  Families 526,  1118 

Madara,  Zaccur  P 526 

Madenford  Family  518 

Madenf ord,  Jeremiah 517 

Mader,  Christian   1082 

Maher,  John  P. 857 

Maher,  Mrs.  Mary  A 857 

Malarkey,  E.  C 692 

Handler,  August   952 

Handler  Family   952 

Manhart,   Henry    890 

Hanhart,  John  M 890 

Hardis,  WiUiam   709 

Harshall,  Charles  H 640 

Hartin  Families 486,  868,  1107 

Hartin,  John  H llW 

Hartin,  Thomas  J 868 

Martin,  William  W 486 

Haster,  Harry  E 1187 

Haster,  Hilton  H 1187 

Hatz,  William    220 

Maurer,  Elmer  H.,  M.  D 277 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


Maurer  FamOies 277, 1088, 1105,  1159 

Maurer,  James  A 1088 

Maurer,  Solomon   1105 

Maurer,  William  B 1182 

May,  Charles  H 761 

Meek  Families  199,  1030 

Meek,  Walter  F 199 

Meisgeier,  August   979 

Mellej,  Eev.  Dennis  J 653 

Mengel  Family  895 

Mengel,  Nathan   895 

Mengle  Family  309 

Mentzer,   John    340 

Mercantile    Club,    MinersviUe 1101 

Meredith,    Mrs.    Leonora 78 

Meredith,   John  S 78 

Merkle  Family   476 

Merrick,    Edwin    E 736 

Messersmith,  Abram  C 833 

Meyers,  Charles   631 

Michael  Family    815 

Michael,  Harry  M 814 

Miller,  Alfred  M   304 

MUler,   Mrs.   Annie 782 

Miller,  Charles  B 446 

Miller,  Charles  D.,  M.  D 102 

Miller,  Edwin  J 276 

Miller  Families 

260,  304,  345,  446,  948,  1139,  1215 

Miller,  George  G 1052 

Miller,  Dr.  George  M 103 

Miller,  Henry  L.   628 

Miller,  Homer  F 948 

Miller,  Jacob    431 

Miller,  John  Frederick  628 

Miller,  John  J ,1215 

Miller,  Levi    645 

Miller,  Milton  H 345 

Miller,  Oliver    805 

Miller,  Bichard  E.,  Sr ' 260 

Miller,  Robert   P 1052 

Minnig,  Floyd  H 560 

Minnig,  Bev.  George  179 

Minogue,    J.    F 691 

Mohl  Family  742 

Moll,  George  B 206 

Moll,  Henry   886 

Moll,  Mrs.  Mary  K 206 

Molony,  Edward  W 785 

Molony,  Joseph  F 784 

Monaghan,  Charles  J 1028 

Monaghan  Family  1209 

Monaghan,  James   B 1027 

Monaghan,  Peter  J 1208 

Moore,  Cyrus    549 

Moore,  Mrs.  Elizabeth  M 550 

Moore  Families   306,  492,  549,  57^ 

Moore,  George  H.,  M.  D 305 

Moore,  Harry  C 573 

Moore,  John  J.,  M.  D 492 

Moore,  SamuPl    778 

Morea  Colliery   860 

Morgan,   George   W 1215 

Morgan,  Morgan    1003 

Morrison  Family    * 501 


Morrison,  Nathaniel  C 501 

Morscher,  Jacob  62 

Mortimer    Family    150 

Mortimer,  F.  P.,   Sr 150 

Mortimer,  F.   Pierce,    Jr 151 

Moser,   Albert  L 773 

Moser  Family   773 

Moyer,   Charles  E 9*2 

Moyer  Families    

.31,  274,  314,  584,  915,  932 

Moyer,  Huston  Bobison   349 

Moyer,  Isaac    32,  274 

Moyer,  Joseph  W 314 

Moyer,  William   F 915 

Murphy,  Dr.  Dennis  J 577 

Murphy  Family    1064 

Murphy,  Michael 1064 

Murphy,  John    273 

Naffin,  Paul  B 718 

Nagle,   Col.   DanieJ 64 

Nagle  Family   ...  1 64 

Nagle,  Gen.  James    66 

Neidlinger,   Christian    651 

Neidlinger    Family    651 

Neiswender,  Edwin  B 723 

Neiswender  Family   723 

Nesbitt,  Mrs.  Kate   1068 

Nesbitt,  Bobert  J 1068 

Nester,  Aaron    881 

Nester,  Daniel    931 

Nester  Families   881,  922,  931 

Nester,  Salem  B 922 

Noecker  Family   173 

Noecker,    James    A 173 

Noel  Family   946 

Noel,   Stephen  E 946 

Norton,  Bev.  Lemuel  B 1147 

O'Brien,  Michael  J 962 

O'Connor,   Thomas   C 253 

O'Donnell,  Joseph  204 

Oerther,  John   647 

Ohl,   Samuel    690 

O'Leary,  David    1164 

Oliver,  George   416 

Oliver,  William    416 

O'NeiU,  Charles   1035 

O'Neill,  George  B 985 

Oren,  James 727 

Oren,  John  M 727 

Orwig,  Peter 179 

Osenbach  Family   796 

Ossman,  Aaron    859 

Ossman,  Philip    859 

Ost,  August  W 479 

Ost,  Charles  F 478 

Oswald  Families 775,  882 

Owens,  Maj.  John  F 697 

Parker  Family    38 

Parker,    Hiram,    Jr 37 

Parrott,  Benjamin  F 1135 

Patten  FamiUes 831,  985 

Patten,  Thomas    985 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


XI 


Patten,  William  T )83i 

Patterson,  Frank  B 1113 

Patterson,  Hon.  George  R 70 

Patterson,  Mrs.  Mary  A 76 

Paul  Family    997 

Paul,  John  J 1035 

Paul,  Thomas  W 997 

Peale,  Charles  Willson 8 

Peale  Family    10 

Peale,  Rubens  H 8 

Peifer  Families 839, 1132 

Peifer,    John 839 

Peifer,  Hiram 1132 

Pelechovych,   Rev.   Joseph.  / 973 

Perry,  Rourindine    1065 

Pershing,  Judge  Cyrus  L 181 

Peter   Family    894 

Petery  Family    302 

Petery,  Oscar  D 301 

Petry   Family    332 

Petry,  Harvey  D 332 

Pf eiffer,  John 620 

Phoenix  Hose  Company,  Shenandoah. .  .1162 

Pleasants,  Gen.   Henry 172 

Pollard,  John  H 256 

Portland,  Charles  A 1171 

Portz,  Frederick,  Jr 191 

Portz,  Frederick,  Sr 191,  203 

Portz,  Harry   K 203 

Pott    (Potts)    Families 44,    170,243 

Pott,  John,   Sr 170 

Prevost,  John   47 

Price,  John  W 1108 

Pugh,  WilUam  S 176 

Purcell,  Mrs.  Mary  Ann 1153 

Purcell,  Michael 1154 

Quail,  Charles  Edward,  M.  D 117 

Quail,  Mrs.   Emma   C 118 

Quandel,   Charles    696 

Quick,    Samuel    772 

Quigel   Family    672 

Quigel,    Valentine    W 672 

Quinn,  Terence  J 912 

RandaU,  David  V 290 

Rarich   Family    431 

Ranch  Family  335 

Ranch,  George  B 335 

Raykowski,  Waldysluw 1044 

Reber  Family   244 

Reber,  George  W 207 

Reber,  Harry   A 207 

Reber,  Horace  F 244 

Reddy,  Christopher  C 951 

Reed,   Albert   L 328 

Reed,  Charles  0 1046 

Reed,  Elias    109 

Reed  FamUies.292,  328,  333,  692,  1046,  1207 

Reed,  Frederick  B 333 

Reed,  Harry  D 692 

Reed,  Jacob  D 109 

Reed,  Samuel    292 

Reed,  Sherman  H 1207 


Reese   Families    287,  786 

Reese,  Frank  C 368 

Reese,  John    368 

Reese,  John   W 287 

Reese,  Stephen    786 

Reichard,    Joseph    398 

Reichwein,    Henry    1021 

Reick,  Frederick   431 

Reick,  William  H 432 

Reid,   Robert   A 325 

Reilly,   Bernard    14 

Reilly,  James  B 14 

Reiner   Family    1041 

Reinert,  Daniel  260 

Reinhart  Family j 429 

Reinhart,  Henry   429 

Reinoehl,  Levi  E 1089 

Reiseg,  Elmer  G 1017 

Reisig,  Frederick   567 

Remaly,  Lewis  F 832 

Renner  Family   1061 

Renner,  William   1061 

Renninger  Family    970 

Renninger,  John   970 

Rentschler  Family 614 

Rentschler,  Henry  D.,  M.  D 614 

Rice,   Aaron   L 1082 

Rice  Family 1082 

Richards,  William  C 569 

Richenderfer,  John  H 1137 

Rickert  Family  39 

Rickert,  Col.  Thomas  H 39 

Ridgway,  Thomas  S 610 

Riegel  Family  542 

^Riegel,    Samuel   A.... 542 

Riland   (Ryland)   Family 852 

Rissinger,  Abraham  F 1188 

Rissinger,  Jacob  J 1190 

Robinhold   Family    490 

Robinhold,  Lewis  C,  M.  D 491 

Robinhold,    William    L 491 

Rockwell,   W.   B 180 

Robinson,  Moncure 180 

Robinson,  William  H.,  M.  D 108 

Romberger,  James  M 1048 

Romberger,  Jesse  M 1047 

Romig   Family    649 

Rooney,  Christ  J 1111 

Rooney   Family    1111 

Rosenberger,  Clemens    M 367 

Rosenberger   Family    367 

Rubright,  Charles  H 825 

Rubright   Families    825,  939 

Rumbel  Families 616,  1157 

Rumbel,  Richard  T 1159 

Rumbel.  Trenton  W 1157 

Rump  Family    1098 

Rump,  William   1098 

Ryan,    Martin    F 1061 

Ryland    (Riland)    FamUy 852 

Ryland,  William  H 852 

Ryon,   George   W 190 

Ryon,    Judge   James 190 

Ryon,  John  Percy 190 

Ryon,  Hon.  John  W 190 


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Xll 


SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


Sabaloski,   Mat 1113 

Sabold,  William  H.,  Sr. 1182 

Sachs  Family   801 

Sachs,   Henry    801 

Sassaman  Family  457 

Saterleo,  Britton  W 720 

Schablein,   Joseph    283 

Schablein,  Michael  283 

^Schaefer,   Charles  T 830 

VSchaefer   Family    830 

X  Schaeffer  Families   442,  462 

XSchaeffer,  George  M 462 

/  Schaffer  Families   807,  1010 

y  Schaflfer,  Salem  B 807 

Schalck,  Adolph  W 528 

Schalck,  Mrs.  Emma  R 531 

Schalck,  George    528 

Schaller  Family    1008 

Schappell    (Shappell)    Families    

541,  682,  733,  988,'  1006 

Schappell,   George  W 988 

Scharadin   (Sharadin)   Families 

211,  308,  312 

Scharadin,   Harry  F 312 

Scharadin,   Jacob   A 307 

>Scheaffer,  Joseph  1013 
Scheaffer,  Sebastian  1013 
Scheele   Brothers    398 

Scheele,  Carl   398 

Schenck,    Fred    940 

Schief,    Charles   F 1110 

Schief,  Mrs.  Sofie 1110 

Schilling  Family    671      — *^.  ^^^    

Schilling,  John  C 671  >    Sheaier,  Lesley  G 

Schlaseman,  Elmer  F 514  y  Sheaf er,  Paul 


Scott,  George 264 

Scott,  John  A 707 

Scott,  John  G 265 

Scott,  Bobert  S.  . , 265 

Scott,  Walter  W 707 

Seiberling  Family    387 

Seitzinger,  Miss  Emma .'....  240 

Seitzinger  Family.  .19,  239,  783,  986,  1036 

Seitzinger,    Henry   M 1036 

Seitzinger,  Jeremiah    783 

Seitzinger,  James  M 986 

Seitnnger,  CoL  Nicholas 19 

Seitzinger,  Judge  Nicholas   239 

Seligman,  Abraham  Pott,  M.  D 242 

Seligman  Family   242 

Seltzer,   Albert  W 110 

Seltzer,   Conrad    ; 110 

Seltzer  Families   619,  942,  962 

Seltzer,  Francis  B 962 

Seltzer,  Frank   P 942 

Seltzer,  Miss    E.    W 963 

Seltzer,  Wesley    A 619 

Shannon,  Benjamin  Franklin,  M.  D. . .   162 

Shannon,  Samuel  H.,  M.  D 160 

Shappell,  Andrew  J 683 

Shappell,  Benjamin  * 733 

Shappell,  Daniel    683 

Shappell,  Elias  F 541 

Shappell  Families.. 541,  682,  733,  988,  1006 

Sharadin,  Edward   211 

Sharadin    (Scharadin)    Families 

211,  308,  312 

Shaw,  John    413 

25 

1176 


Schlaseman,  Jacob  A 515  y  Sheafer,  Peter  W. 


Schlear,  Alfred  925 

Schlear  Family  925 

Schlegel  Family  553 

Schlegel,    James   D 653 

Schmeltzer   Family    1043 

Schmeltzer,   Frank  A 1043 

Schmidt,    Christian    336 

Schmidt,  Philip    336 

Schneider,  Mrs.  Catherine 524 

Schneider,   Mrs.  Elizabeth 700 

Schneider  Families   90,  706 

Schneider,  John  F 700 

Schneider,  Peter  J.    (deceased) 524 

Schneider,  Peter   J.    (Locustdale) 762 

Schneider,  Theodore  D 706 

Schoch   (Schock)   Family 954 

Schoeneman,   Michael    1102 

Schrepple,    Gottlieb    E 650 

Schrope,  Charles  A 674 

Schrope  Family    674 

Schulz,  Jacob  R 929 

Schulze,    Harry   F 1075 

Schuyler,   Joseph   M 20 

Schuyler,  Miss  Mary  1 20 

Schwalm  FamiUes 754,  992,  1217 

Schwalra,   George   M 992 

Schwalm,  Ralph  A 1217 

Schwartz,  Joseph   331 

Scott,  Alexander    263 


25 

y^Sheafer,  Walter  S 1175 

Sheafer,  William  L 24 

Shearer,  Robert  C 343 

Shellhamer   Family    755 

Shellhamer,   Jackson   M 755 

Shellhammer,  Benjamin  F 1001 

Shellhammer  Families ..  686,  755,  982,  1001 

Shellhammer,   James   M 686 

Sherry   Family    921 

Shirey  Family 1112 

Shirey,    John    1112 

Shissler,  Mrs.    Clara    K 867 

Shissler,  Edward   L 866 

Shoemaker  Families   737,  913 

Shoemaker,  James  A 913 

Shoemaker,  John  H 737 

Shoener,  Edward    780 

Shoener,    Mrs.   Emma 744 

Shoener  Families 279,  743,   780,  910 

Shoener,  John    910 

Shoener,  Hon.  John  T 278 

Shoener,  Joseph    743 

Siefert,  Williara  H 748 

Silliman,  Mrs.  Catharine    62 

Silliman,  Edward  S 67 

Silliman    (Sillyman)    Families 

: 60,  68,  120,  208 

Silliman,    H.    1 20S 

Silliman,   James  K 60 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


xui 


Silljman    (Silliman)    Families 

60,    68,    120,208 

Sillyman,  Samuel   120 

^       Sillyman,  Miss  Sosan  J 122 

Simmons,  Thomas   1075 

Sittler,   Calvin  E 361 

SittJer    (Sitler)    Families . 361,  470 

Slater,  Mrs.   Clara  K 401 

Slater,   George  W 400 

Slater,  Henry  P 400 

Smith,  Charles  E 1172 

Smith,  Charles  H 1074 

Smith,  David  G 227 

Smith  Famines 388,  477,  1074,  1172 

Smith,  Jeremiah    388 

Smith,  Joseph  G 1176 

Smith,  William  E 108 

Smith,  William  S 476 

Snyder,  Charles  A 144 

Snyder  Family   48S 

Snyder,   Frank    316 

Snyder,  B^ben    316 

Spayd,  Prof.  H.  H 126 

Speacht,  Mrs.  Dorothy 393 

Speacht  Family 392,  401 

Speacht,   Frederick    392 

Spencer,  Mrs.  Amelia  J 47 

Spencer,  George    45 

Spencer/  William    45 

Spitzner,  Valentine  1070 

Spohn,  Moncure  B... 1023 

St.  Clair  Family 1024 

St  Clair,  Oscar 1024 

St  Peter's  Chnrch  (Reformed) 426 

St  Mary's  Church,  Tremont 653 

Stamm  Family   879 

Starr,  David    761 

Starr  Families    88,  761,  1012 

Starr,  William  A 1012 

Staudt  (Stoudt,  Stout)  Families 

447,   509,   729 

Staudt,   John  F 447 

Staudt,   John   S 509 

Stauffer,  Arttiur  Elliott 482 

Stauff er,  Elias  K 480 

Stauflfer  FamiUes 480,  845,  1115,  1165 

SUuffer,  John  M 1115 

Stauffer,  Norman  M 1165 

Stauffer,  William  E 1166 

Steigerwalt,   Albert  H 376 

Steigerwalt  Families    376,  395  ^ 

Stein,  Danid   324 

Stein  Families   140,  418 

Stein,  Jonathan  Frank 417 

Stein,  Franklin  M 142 

Stein,  Moses  S 140 

Steiner  Family   .' 424 

Stephens,   Albert    lO'il 

Sterner  Family  919 

Sterner,    Frank   R 919 

Stewart,  Harry  H^  M.  D 581 

Stichter,   George  H 625 

Stief  Family  758 

Stief,   John   A 758 

Stiles  Famfly 1015 


Stiles,  Michael  V 1015 

Stine    Family    v ^32 

Stine,  William  N 632 

Stitzer   Family    503,  687 

Stitzer,   William   F 503 

Stitzer,   William   G 687 

Stoker  Family    934 

Stoudt  (Staudt,  Stout)  Families 

447,   509,   729 

Strauch '  Family    450 

Strauch,   Robert   D 450 

Strause  (Strauss,  Strouse)  Family....  215 

Strause,  Samuel 215 

Striegel,  John  G.,  M.  D 520 

Strubhar,   Aaron    767 

Strubhar  Family    767 

Stutzman  Family  836 

Stutzman,  Raymond  H.,  M.  D 835 

Super  Family  433 

Swoyer  Family  997 

Tallman,  Henry 1177 

Tallman,  Mrs.  Mary  A 1177 

Tasker,  Reese  238 

Taylor,    William    T 827 

Thomas  Family    192 

Thomas,  Thomas  L 193 

Thomas,  Mrs.  Thomas  L 84,  194,  196 

Thompson,  Alexander   668 

Thompson,  Hon.  Alexander 669 

Thompson,  Charles  D 906 

Thompson  Families.. 32,  112,  114,  907,  1053 

Thompson,  Heber  H 35 

Thompson,  Maj.  Heber  S 32 

Thompson,    Isaac    B 669 

Thompson,   Lewis   C 113 

Thompson,   Oliver   C 1053 

Thompson,  Ool.  William 112 

Tielman,    William    1110 

Toole,  John 1114 

Toomey,    John    829 

Toomey,  Michael 829 

Trachte,  William   494 

Tregea  Family   1004 

Trexler   Family    967 

Turner  Family    921 

Tyson  Family  742 

J 

Underkoffler,  Charles  M 772 

Unger,   Albert  A 495 

Updegrave    Families    439,  681 

Updegrave,    Morris    680 

Updegrave,   Philip   H 439 

Updegrove    Family    661 

Updegrove,  Walter  E 661 

Van  Horn  Family 644 

Veith,  John 209,  1201 

Veith,   John,   Jr 211 

Vetter,  David    704 

Vetter  Family   704,  977 

Wachter,  George  A 943 

Wachter,  Rudolph    944 

Wadlinger,  Mrs.  Margaret  D 50 


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XIV 


SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 


Wadiinger,  Francis   48 

Wadlinger,  Judge  Qeorge  J 48 

'   Wagner,  Alfred  B 1016 

Wagner,  Charles  C 545 

Wagner,  Charles  G 508 

Wagner   Families    219, 

508,  545,  558,  781,  824,  886,  1014,  1016 

Wagner,   Franklin    781 

.Wagner,  Frederick  R.,  D.  D.  S 558 

Wagner,  Henry  A 547 

Wagner,  Mrs.  Mary  A 571 

Wagner,  Philip 823 

Wagner,   Samuel   C 571 

Wagner,  William   M 219 

Walbom  Families. . ./ 156,  1087 

Walbom,  Ira  Guy 157 

Walbom,   Jonathan   H 156 

Walbom,  Joseph  A 158 

Walbom,  Maurice  D 157 

Wallauer,  Jacob  379 

Walter  Families    677,  793 

Walter,  George  W 793 

Walters,   Henry    92 

Walters,   William   H 92 

Warne,  Joseph  L.,  M.  D 1175 

Watson  Families 1175,  1186 

Watson,  George  M 1186 

Weaklim,    William    T 63 

Weaver    (Weber)    Family 912 

Weber    (Weaver)    Family 912 

Weber,   Louis 327 

Weber,  William  F \ 327 

Weidman  Family   864 

Weidman,   Samuel    864 

Weiser,  Conrad 158 

Weishampel  Family 119 

Weissinger   Family    27 

Weissinger,  George    29 

Weissinger,  Harry   30 

Weissinger,  Leonard  W 27 

Weldon,   Michael    1100 

Weldy,   Charles  H 95 

Weldy,  Henry  A 93 

Wellendorf ,  Joseph   1080 

Wertley  Family    266 

Wertley,    Walter    266 

Wertley,    Wellington    A 267 

Wertman    Family    820 

Wessner  Family   431 

Whalen,  Edward  J 1160 

Whalen  Family 1160 

White  Families   978,  1090 

White,  J.  S 1090 

White,  Maj.  J.  aaude 320 

White,  Joseph  R 978 

Whitfield,    Joseph    928 

Whitfield,  Mrs.  Lottie  E 929 

Whitfield,  Rowland    928 

Wiesner,  Dr.  Edwin  E 384 

Wiesner  Family   384 

Wiest  Family 478 


Wilhelm,  William  224 

Williams,  Mrs.  Annie 1050 

Williams,  William   1050 

Wingert,   Adam    884 

Wingert  Family   884 

Wintersteen,  Mrs.  John 1172 

Withelder  Families 1079,  1083 

Withelder,    Frederick    1083 

Withelder,  John  H 1079 

Wittich,    Henry    W 1077 

Wittmer,   Martin    999 

Wittmer,  Mrs.  Mary 999 

Wolfgang   Family    771 

Wolfgang,  Paul    771 

Womer   (Woomer)    Family 390,440 

Womer,  Monroe   390 

Wonders,  Newton  M 714 

Woolcock,   John    145 

Woomer,   Elmer    440 

Woomer   (Womer)   Family 390,  440 

Yarnall  Families   472,  666 

Yamall,    Ephraim    666 

Yeager,  Alfred  A 819 

Yeager  Family  819 

Yeingst,  Prof.  WUbur  M 360 

Yerger  Family   701 

Yerger,  Henry    701 

Yoder  Family 582 

Yoder,  Irvin  U 582 

Yorkville   Fire   Company 456 

Yost,  Benjamin  J 797 

Yost  Families.  .322,  402,  446,  660,  798,  924 

Yost,    Israel    924 

Yost,  James  A 402 

Yost,   Jonathan    1 322 

Young,  George   821 

Zapf,  Charles  A 578 

Zapf,  William   E 578 

Zehner  Families   739,  740,  984 

Zehner,   Lewis   A 740 

Zerbe  Family    579 

Zerbe,   William    E 579 

Zettlemoyer  Family 1093 

Zettlemoyer,  Frank    .' 1093 

Zimmerman,  Alfred   955 

Zimmerman,    Edward    1093 

Zimmerman   Families    

550,  558,  811,  955,  1093,  1205 

Zimmerman,  George  K 811 

Zimmerman,   Robert  J 550 

Zimmerman,  William  H 1205 

Zion  's   Lutheran    Church 789 

Zion  's   Reformed   Church 426 

Zulich,  Mrs.  E.  R 233 

Zulich    Family    232 

Zulich,  Henry  B 232 

Zulick  Family   603 

Zulick,    John    S 604 

Zulick,  Thomas  H.  B 603 


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Genealogy— Family  History 
Biography 


JOHN  BANNAN,  deceased,  was  in  his  time  a  lawyer  of  the  first  rank  in 
his  State.  He  was  truly  said  by  a  writer  of  his  time  to  have  been  a  self-made 
man,  but  well  made.  He  was  bom  in  Berks  county,  Pa.,  Sept.  19,  1796,  and  at 
the  age  of  fifteen  became  an  orphan,  entirely  dependent  upon  his  own  efforts 
for  making  a  success  in  the  struggle  of  life.  He  attended  the  subscription 
schools  of  the  early  times,  the  terms  of  which  were  only  three  months  in  the 
year,  and  in  the  interim  was  cared  for  by  an  uncle  who  lived  on  a  farm.  But 
he  had  the  ambition  for  better  things,  and  for  years  thereafter  labored  to 
increase  his  store  of  knowledge,  so  that  he  might  be  better  equipped  for  the 
coming  years.  He  began  his  career  as  an  engineer  under  Phillip  Wemwag, 
who  lived  at  Douglassville,  where  his  parents  are  buried ;  studied  law  at  Read- 
ing under  Charles  Evans,  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  181 8,  and  began  practice  in 
Orwigsburg.  Later,  when  the  seat  of  justice  was  removed  to  Pottsville,  he 
removed  to  that  city,  to  remain  until  death  brought  a  close  to  his  labors.  When 
the  war  of  18 12  occurred  he  entered  the  ist  Regiment  of  Pennsylvania 
Volunteers,  locally  known  as  the  "Washington  Bluest  serving  as  a  private 
soldier  under  Capt.  D.  B.  Keim  until  the  end  of  the  war.  So  patriotic  was 
Mr.  Bannan  that  when  the  Civil  war  occurred  he  offered  his  services  at  once, 
but  the  age  of  sixty-five  was  the  bar  to  his  enlistment.  However,  he  assisted 
in  the  care  of  the  families  of  those  left  behind  and  contributed  his  time  and 
money  to  the  relief  of  the  soldiers  and  their  widows. 

John  Bannan  was  married  to  Sarah  Ann  Ridgway,  who  was  born  on  the 
last  day  of  the  year  1806,  and  died  at  the  family  home  in  November,  1879. 
They  were  the  parents  of  three  sons  and  three  daughters:    Zelia  R. ;  Mary 

{oy;  Thomas  R.;  Douglass  R.;  Francis  B.,  and  Martha  Ridgway.  In  1852 
Ir.  Bannan  built  his  beautiful  residence  oh  Sharp  Mountain,  "Cloud  Home," 
the  plans  being  furnished  by  his  wife  (who  displayed  remarkable  talent  for 
this  class  of  work),  directed  by  the  architect. 

At  the  time  of  the  projected  erection  of  the  Henry  Clay  monument  in 
Pottsville,  Mr.  Bannan  gave  a  tract  120  feet  square  for  the  location  of  tfie 
structure,  and  it  was  accepted.  This  tall  and  striking  column,  surmounted  with 
a  colossal  statute  of  the  great  orator  and  statesman,  was  begun  July  28,  1852, 
and  dedicated  July  4,  1855.    It  stands  just  below  the  site  of  "Cloud  Home." 

Francis  B.  Bannan,  son  of  John  Bannan,  was  bom  in  Orwigsburg, 
Schuylkill  county,  Feb.  28,  1833,  and  attended  the  local  schools  and  a  select 
school  at  New  Haven,  Conn.  He  took  up  the  task  of  earning  a  living  by 
entering  the  employ  of  Joel  J.  Bailey  &  Co.,  of  Philadelphia,  holding  the  posi- 
tion of  clerk  from  1850  to  18^5.  He  then  went  for  a  short  time  with  Daniel 
Kaiser,  of  the  same  city,  finally  coming  to  Pottsville.  For  a  number  of  years 
VoLH— 1  ,A    , 

609>.-l 


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610  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

he  was  in  partnership  with  Robert  Allison,  under  the  firm  name  of  AlUson  & 
mnmn,  manufacturmg  all  kinds  of  mining  machinery,  drills,  compressors,  etc. 
In  1876  he  closed  out  his  interest,  and  in  1878  he  went  into  the  business  of 
steamheatmg  also  having  a  machine  shop  at  Pottsville.  He  continued  this 
work  until  1889,  when  he  retired  from  active  life. 

T  i-^"/-]^?"*  ''  ^^3*  ^^-  ^^""^"  ^^s  married  to  Mary  T.,  daughter  of  Mrs 
Julia  (Kuethenthal)  Repplier,  and  step-daughter  of  George  S.  Repplier. 
Mrs.  Bannan  died  Dec.  22,  1893.  They  had  children  as  follows:  John  R, 
living  m-Philadelphia;  Imogen  R.,  widow  of  H.  C.  Halberstadt,  formerly  of 
tiie  Pottsville  Supply  Company;  Clara  R.,  wife  of  H.  H.  Lineweaver.  of 
Menon,  Pa. ;  and  Bertha  L.,  living  at  home. 

Mr.  Bannan  was  one  of  the  first  to  enlist,  April  13,  1861,  in  the  "First 
Defenders,"  known  as  the  Washington  Artillery,  and  was  honorably  discharged 
July  31,  186 1.  He  is  a  natural  mechanical  genius,  and  many  specimens  of  his 
handiwork  are  to  be  seen  at  the  old  home  on  the  mountain,  **Cloud'Home." 
H^  has  also  invented  a  unique  method  of  picture-writing  with  tacks,  which  he 
calls  "Taxography."  He  is  a  writer  of  no  mean  capacity,  having  issued  a 
pamphlet,  the  gist  of  which  he  read  before  the  Schuylkill  County  Historical 
Society,  entitled  * 'Reminiscences  of  a  Long  and  Happy  Life  of  Fun,  Frolic  and 
Mischief."  He  has  gotten  together  the  details  of  many  a  childish  escapade 
and  incident  of  his  boyhood  and  maturity,  which  are  not  only  presented  in  an 
interesting  and  colloquial  manner,  but  betray  a  disposition  at  once  humorous 
,  and  ingenuous. 

Thomas  R.  Bannan,  deceased,  son  of  John  Bannan,  was  bom  Oct.  10, 
1827,  in  Orwigsburg,  and  there  began  his  education  in  the  public  schools. 
Entering  Yale  College,  he  graduated  from  the  law  school,  returned  to  Potts- 
ville, and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  practiced 
until  his  death.  He  was  one  of  the  most  scholarly,  able  and  gentlemanly 
pleaders  of  his  time.  He  served  for  a  short,  period  in  the  Civil  war  and  then 
returned  to  his  practice.    He  died  in  1878. 

Martha  Ridgway  Bannan,  the  only  surviving  daughter  of  John  Bannan, 
was  bom  in  Orwigsburg,  and  attended  the  private  school  of  Miss  Allen,  in 
Pottsville.  Later  she  continued  her  studies  in  Philadelphia.  Music  and  litera- 
ture have  been  her  chief  interests.  She  has  written  in  verse,  and  translated 
some  of  Goethe's  poems  from  the  German,  which  are  published  in  book  form. 
She  is  now  living  in  her  father  and  mother's  old  home.  **Cloud  Home."  Her 
sister  Zelia  R.  died  Dec.  14,  191 1,  and  Mary  Joy  passed  to  rest  May  17,  1912. 
Miss  Bannan  is  a  member  of  the  Trinity  Episcopal  Church  of  Pottsville. 

Thomas  S.  Ridgway,  father  of  Mrs.  John  Bannan,  was  bom  at  Mount 
Holly,  N.  J.,  and  was  an  architect,  skilled  in  his  profession,  having  drawn 
the  plans  for  many  of  the  finest  homes  in  Philadelphia,  where  he  lived  pre- 
viously to  his  removal  to  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  When  he  came  to  this  county 
he  became  interested  in  coal  lands,  and  he  it  was  who  induced  his  friend 
Stephen  Girard  to  invest  in  the  lands  which  have  since  become  so  enormously 
profitable.  He  married  Mary  Joy,  daughter  of  Daniel  Joy,  who  was  ordnance 
master  in  the  Revolutionary  war.  They  had  a  family  of  twelve  children,  ten 
of  whom  grew  to  maturity. 

PHAON  HERMANY,  M.  D.,  of  Mahanoy  City,  the  oldest  practicing  phy- 
sician in  that  section  of  Schuylkill  county,  has  made  a  distinguished  record  in 
his  long  professional  career,  a  half  century  and  more  of  faithful  service  to 
his  fellow  men.    His  ideals  of  duty  have  been  set  forth  in  practical  illustra- 


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HENRY  CLAY  MONUMENT,  POTTSVILLE 
Cornerstone  Laid  July  28,  1862,  Dedicated  July  4,  1865 

Henry  Clav.  Born  in  Hanover  county,  near  Richmond,  Va.,  April  12.  1777;  died  at  Washington, 
D.  C,  June  29,  1852.  A  celebrated  American  statesman  and  orator.  He  was  United  States  senator 
from  Kentucky.  1806-07  and  1810-11;  was  member  of  Congress  from  Kentucky,  1811-21  and  1828-25 
(serving  as  speaker  1811-14,  1816-20  and  1828-25);  was  peace  commissioner  at  Ghent  in  1814;  was 
candidate  for  the  presidency  in  1824;  was  secretary  of  state.  1825-29;  was  United  States  senator, 
1881-42  and  1849-52:  was  Whig  candidate  for  presidency  in  1882  and  1844;  was  the  chief  designer 
of  the  "Missouri  Compromise"  of  1820.  and  of  the  compromise  of  1850;  and  was  the  author  of  the 
compromise  tariff  of  1888. 


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'i:'.E  r:LW  YjLK 
'UBLIC  LIBRARY 


APTOR,  LENOX 
TM-DKN    FOUNDATIONS 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  611 

tions  throughout  this  extended  period  of  activity,  and  the  sum  of  his  useful 
ness  may  be  best  read  in  the  popularity  he  enjoys  among  his  townsmen. 
Public  spirit  in  those  things  affecting  the  general  welfare,  and  conscientious- 
ness in  his  personal  relations  with  all  whose  lives  have  touched  his  directly, 
have  been  the  surface  indications  of  a  character  whose  depth  has  been  sounded 
by  many  besides  his  close  intimates.  Through  the  medium  of  his  profes- 
sion he  has  no  doubt  had  unusually  good  opportunities  for  observation  and 
first-hand  knowledge  of  many  conditions  in  the  community  calling  for  better- 
ment, and  the  wisdom  of  his  judgment  has  been  proved  in  many  tests. 
Coming  to  Mahanoy  City  in  1863,  the  year  the  borough  was  organized,  he 
has  had  a  part  in  the  making  of  practically  all  her  history.  When  he  came 
here  he  made  his  rounds  on  horseback,  and  no  one  in  this  section  has  had 
more  reason  to  be  gratified  at  the  improvement  in  roads  and  transportation 
facilities. 

Dr.  Hermany  is  of  German  descent,  and  the  family  name  was  originally 
spelled  Hermon.  The  Doctor's  great-grandfather  was  the  emigrant  ancestor, 
coming  to  this  country  in  1756,  and  settling  first  near  Philadelphia,  Pa.  How- 
ever, he  moved  to  Lehigh  county  not  long  afterwards,  and  there  his  son  Philip 
Hermany,  the  Doctor's  grandfather,  who  was  bom  at  sea  while  his  parents 
were  en  route  from  the  Old  to  the  New  World,  grew  to  manhood.  John 
Hermany,  son  of. Philip,  wa^  bom  in  Lehigh  county  in  the  year  1800,  and 
passed  all  his  life  there,  dying  Sept.  3,  1863,  aged  sixty-three  years.  During 
his  earlier  manhood  he  followed  farming,  later  conducting  a  store  and  hotel, 
and  he  was  the  founder  of  the  village  of  Jacksonville,  where  he  served  as 
postmaster  for  twenty  years.  His  religious  faith  was  that  of  the  German 
Reformed  Church.  He  married  Salome  Kistler,  like  himself  a  native  of 
Lehigh  county,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  ten  children,  four  sons  and  six 
daughters,  all  bom  at  the  old  homestead  at  Jacksonville,  of  whom  we  have 
the  following  record:  Didama  (Mrs.  Brobst),  bom  in  1833;  Sallie  (Mrs. 
Crietz),  born  in  1B35,  who  died  in  1862;  Mary  (Mrs.  Wuchter),  bom  in  1837; 
Edwin,  born  in  1838;  Phaon ;  Lydia,  born  in  1842;  John,  Jr.,  born  in  1844; 
and  Martha  M.,  bom  in  1850. 

Phaon  Hermany  was  bom  Sept.  16,  1840,  and  spent  his  boyhood  in  Lehigh 
county,  beginning  his  education  in  the  schools  of  the  home  locality.  Later  he 
attended  an  academy  at  the  Trappe,  in  Montgomery  county,  and  he  commenced 
the  study  of  medicine  with  Dr.  Daniel  Shade,  of  Lehigh  county.  He  took  the 
r^ular  course  at  the  medical  department  of  the  University  of  New  York, 
graduating  March  3,  1863,  and  before  long  had  started  practice  at  Mahanoy 
City,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  At  that  time  there  were  but  sixty-three  houses  in 
the  town,  and  he  was  the  third  physician  to  locate  here,  Drs.  Philip  Weber 
and  Brender  having  arrived  a  short  time  before.  With  the  exception  of  four 
years  during  which  he  carried  on  a  dmg  business  he  has  devoted  himself 
entirely  to  practice  since,  and  with  continuous  success,  few  men  in  any  walk 
of  life  being  better  known  in  the  region.  Recognition  of  his  ability  has  come 
from  his  fellow  members  in  the  profession  as  well  as  from  patrons.  More 
than  twenty  years  ago  he  was  chosen  president  of  the  Schuylkill  County  Med- 
ical Society,  and  he  is  also  a  member  in  good  standing  of  the  Lehigh  County 
Medical  Society,  the  Pennsylvania  State  Medical  Society  and  the  American 
Medical  Association.  In  1864  he  was  appointed  surgeon  for  the  Lehigh  Val- 
ley Railway  Company,  during  the  period  when  Hon.  Asa  Packer  was  president 
of  that  company.  His  field  embraced  the  territory  in  and  about  Mahanoy 
City.     Fraternally  Dr.  Hermany  is  a  high  Mason,  belonging  to  Mahanoy  City 


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612  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Lodge,  No.  357,  F.  &  A.  M.  (past  master)  ;  Mizpah  Chapter,  No.  252,  R.  A.  M. 
(past  officer,  and  secretary  continuously  since  1881)  ;  Ivanhoe  Commandery, 
No.  31,  JC  T.  (past  officer);  Philadelphia  Consistory,  thirty-second  degree; 
Lu  Lu  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.,  of  Philadelphia;  and  the  Northwestern 
Masonic  Aid  Association.  Years  ago  he  joined  Council  No.  162,  Royal 
Arcanum,  of  Mahanoy  City;  Asa  Packer  Lodge,  No.  328,  I.  O.  O.  F. ;  and 
Washington  Camp  No.  124,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  He  was  a  charter  member  of  the 
first  fire  company  organized  in  the  borough.  Though  he  never  sought  honors 
of  any  kind,  Dr.  Hermany  was  elected  a  member  of  the  local  school  board 
several  times,  serving  on  that  body  seventeen  and  a  half  years,  and  for  a  time 
as  president.  His  interest  in  educational  advancement,  and  foresight  in  pro- 
viding against  the  growing  needs  of  the  community,  made  his  work  in  this 
connection  especially  valuable.  For  many  years  he  acted  as  deputy  coroner  in 
Mahanoy  City  and  vicinity.  Politically  he  has  adhered  loyally  to  the  principles 
of  the  Republican  party. 

On  Dec.  6,  1863,  Dr.  Hermany  was  married  in  Mahanoy  City  to  Mary  J. 
Bowman,  of  Bowmanstown,  Lehigh  Co.,  Pa.,  daughter  of  David  and  Susan 
(Lentz)  Bowman.  Four  children  have  been  bom  to  this  marriage:  Horace 
David  graduated  from  JeflFerson  Medical  College  in  1891,  for  a  time  prac- 
ticed medicine  and  conducted  a  drug  store  in  Philadelphia,  next  followed 
denti$try,  and  is  now  engaged  in  electrical  work  in  Mahanoy  City ;  Robert  K. 
died  in  1872,  when  four  years  old ;  Susan  L.  B.  is  married  to  William  Dyatt 
and  resides  at  Hazleton,  Pa. ;  Sallie  B.  K.  is  at  honle.  The  familv  are  members 
of  the  English  Lutheran  Church.  They  reside  in  a  beautiful  home  at  No.  56 
South  Main  street,  where  the  Doctor  also  has  his  office. 

FRANK  J.  LAUBENSTEIN,  of  Ashland,  executive  head  of  the  business 
of  the  Laubenstein  Manufacturing  Company,  is  a  representative  of  honored 
stock  of  Schuylkill  county.  The  name  he  bears  has  also  been  prominently 
associated  with  industrial  interests  at  Ashland  from  the  early  seventies,  when 
Jonas  Laubenstein,  his  grandfather,  became  owner  of  the  business  continued 
since  his  day  by  his  son  and  grandsons,  a  manufacturing  concern  whose  pros- 
perity has  contributed  materially  to  that  of  the  borough. 

The  Laubensteins  are  of  Genpan  origin,  and  this  branch  of  the  family  has 
been,  established  in  America  since  1756,  settling  then  in  what  is  now  Schuylkill 
county.  Pa.,  where  descendants  of  the  original  ancestors  in  this  country  have 
been  resident  continuously  to  the  present. 

Jonas  Laubenstein,  the  grandfather  of  Frank  J.  Laubenstein,  lived  and  died 
in  Schuylkill  county.  During  the  Civil  war  he  was  a  loyal  Union  supporter 
and  served  in  the  army.  Becoming  profitably  engaged  in  business  as  a  manu- 
facturer of  screens,  he  owned  a  plant  at  Minersville,  and  in  the  early  seventies 
(1875)  erected  a  plant  of  the  same  kind  at  Ashland.  As  previously  stated, 
the  business  has  been  continued  by  the  Laubensteins  ever  since.  Jonas  Lau- 
benstein married  a  Keumer,  and  the  following  children  were  born  to  them: 
Rev.  William,  deceased,  who  was  a  minister  of  the  Lutheran  Church ;  Albert  L. ; 
David  F.,  deceased,  who  was  a  musician ;  Charles  S.,  who  is  engaged  in  busi- 
ness at  Ashland  as  a  manufacturer  of  screens  and  elevator  buckets  (he  is  also 
in  the  State  game  protection  service)  ;  George,  formerly  a  resident  of  Phila- 
delphia and  employed  by  the  Philadelphia  Press;  Jonas,  of  Minersville,  present 
postmaster  of  that  borough ;  and  Katie,  deceased. 

Albert  L.  Laubenstein  was  bom  in  Schuylkill  county,  and  he  was  con- 
nected with  the  screen  manufacturing  business  at  Ashland  from  the  time  his 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  613 

father  bought  the  same  to  the  end  of  his  life.  Though  he  attended  to  his  own 
affairs  systematically  and  withr  unremitting  care,  he  was  also  solicitous  for 
local  enterprises  which  affected  the  general  welfare,  and  took  some  part  in 
politics  in  his  borough.     He  was  a  Republican  on  national  issues. 

Mr.  Laubenstein  married  Ida  M.  Roads,  daughter  of  Franklin  Roads,  at 
one  time  a  resident  of  Minersville,  this  county,  and  a  member  of  one  of  Schuyl- 
kill county's  old  families.  Mr.  Roads  was  a  coal  operator  in  this  region  for 
some  time,  and  later  carried  on  a  feed  business.  Of^his  four  children  one  son 
died  young;  Matilda  R.  is  the  widow  of  Jacob  S.  Laurence,  of  Minnesota, 
and  she  resides  at  Ashland,  Pa.;  Purmillea  is, deceased;  Ida  M.  was  the  wife 
of  Albert  L.  Laubenstein. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Laubenstein  were  bom  six  children :  Howard  R.  died  in 
1902;  Frank  J.  is  mentioned  below;  Albert  R.  is  manager  of  the  Laubenstein 
Manufacturing  Company,  of  Ashland;  Harry  W.  is  also  a  member  of  that 
company,  as  is  E.  Carl ;  Ida  R.  is  the  youngest  of  the  family.  The  father  died 
in  March,  1909,  the  mother  in  May,  1910. 

Frank  J.  Laubenstein  was  born  Sept.  3,  1878,  at  Minersville,  Schuylkill  Co., 
Pa.,  and  was  brought  up  at  Ashland,  receiving  his  preparatory  education  in 
the  public  schools  Aere.  After  graduating  from  high  school  he  took  a  course 
at  Lehigh  University,  Bethlehem,  Pa.,  and  in  1897  entered  the  Dickinson  Law 
School,  at  Carlisle,  Pa.  He  was  graduated  from  that  institution  in  1899,  took 
a  post-graduate  course  there  in  1902,  and  was  admitted  to  the  bar  in  Schuylkill 
county  in  1905.  That  year  he  began  the  practice  of  law  at  Ashland,  and  has 
continued  it  since,  giving  considerable  time  to  his  profession  in  spite  of  the 
fact  that  he  has  important  interests  in  the  local  manufacturing  field.  His  l^al 
work  has  attracted  much  favorable  notice,  and  he  has  acquired  a  clientele  rep- 
resentative of  the  best  interests  in  the  community,  the  standing  of  his  patrons 
being  sufficient  comment  on  his  own  reputation.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Law 
Fraternity  and  of  the  American  Bar  Association.  As  president  of  the  Lauben- 
stein Manufacturing  Company  he  has  been  influential  in  shaping  its  present 
policy  and  directing  its  affairs  along  thoroughly  progressive  lines,  continuing 
the  course  for  which  it  has  been  noted  throughout  the  ownership  of  the  Lau- 
bensteins.  Frank  J.  Laubenstein  is  also  doing  effective  work  in  local  politics, 
as  a  member  of  the  Republican  party.  Though  still  a  young  man  he  has  done 
enough  to  show  that  he  possesses  the  qualities  for  which  the  family  name  has 
stood  in  this  region  for  several  generations. 

Mr.  Laubenstein  is  a  member  of  the  B.  P.  O.  Elks  and  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A. 
His  religious  connection  is  with  St.  James'  Lutheran  Church. 

The  Laubenstein  Manufacturing  Company  has  occupied  a  place  as  a 
stable  industrial  asset  of  the  town  of  Ashland  for  over  fifty  years.  Started 
by  George  Helfrig,  it  remained  in  his  hands  until  purchased  about  1875  by 
Albert  L.  Laubenstein,  then  the  manager  of  a  similar  plant  at  Ashland.  He 
had  acquired  considerable  experience  as  a  manufacturer  of  screens.  After 
taking  over  the  factory  he  began  to  enlarge  its  facilities  and  the  scope  of  the 
work  as  increasing  trade  demanded,  having  a  keen  appreciation  of  the  calls  of 
the  market  and  foresight  as  to  the  improvement  of  his  product  and  its  adapta- 
bility to  various  uses  not  hitherto  appreciated.  He  carried  on  the  business* 
until  his  death,  following  a  policy  of  liberal  expansion  which  kept  the  Lauben- 
stein Company  among  the  foremost  of  its  kind.  Following  his  death,  in  the 
year  1909,  it  was  carried  on  for  a  year  by  the  estate,  with  his  sons  in  charge. 
In  the  latter  part  of  1910  his  heirs,  four  sons  and  one  daughter,  incorporated 
under  the  present  name,  the  Laubenstein  Manufacturing  Company,  the  officers 


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614  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

being  Frank  J.  Laubenstein,  president;  E.  Carl  Lauberistein,  vice  president; 
Albert  R.  Laubenstein,  manager;  Harry  W.  Laubenstein,  secretary.  All  the 
brothers  were  born  and  reared  at  Ashland.  The  product  of  the  plant,  princi- 
pally perforated  plates  and  wire  screens,  has  a  recognized  reputation  in  the 
market.  Modem  machinery  and  new  appliances  have  been  installed  wherever 
necessary,  facilitating  operations  and  bringing  the  equipment  up  to  the  maxi- 
mum of  efficiency.  The  enterprising  spirit  of  the  owners  has  animated  every 
branch  of  the  work,  which  is  going  forward  along  the  most  approved  modem 
lines. 

HENRY  D.  RENTSCHLER,  M.  D.,  of  Ringtown,  Schuylkill  county,  a 
practicing  physician  there  for  over  fifty  years,  has  during  all  that  period  been 
held  in  deserved  esteem  for  his  sincere  devotion  to  the  best  interests  of  the 
community  in  which  he  chose  to  spend  his  life.  His  labors  have  all  been  in 
useful  channels,  contributing  directly  or  incidentally  to  the  general  well- 
being.  As  one  of  the  guardians  of  local  prosperity  he  has  allied  himself  with 
worthy  movements  of  every  character,  whether  their  object  was  the  eleva- 
tion of  social  conditions,  the  widening  of  business  opportunities,  or  the  mate- 
rial improvement  of  his  borough.  With  broad  intelligence  and  far-reaching 
sympathies  he  combines  a  versatility  of  talent  which  not  only  assured  his 
professional  success,  but  made  him  a  valued  cooperator  in  those  enterprises 
which  require  foresight,  clear  judgment  and  executive  capacity.  Brought  into 
close  daily  contact  with  all  classes  of  his  fellow  chizens,  he  made  practical 
use  of  the  knowledge  thus  acquired  regarding  their  vital  needs,  and  never 
withheld  his  services  in  the  promotion  of  such  causes  as  he  felt  were  favorable 
to  supplying  them.  For  many  years  he  was  the  honored  medical  adviser  of 
many  a  family,  and  though  he  has  withdrawn  from  most  of  the  arduous  work 
of  the  profession  he  is  still  in  demand  for  consultation,  and  attends  to  a  large 
office  practice. 

The  Rentschler  family  is  of  German  stock,  and  was  founded  in  Berks 
county,  Pa.,  about  the  time  of  the  close  of  the  Revolutionary  war,  there  being 
three  brothers,  one  of  whom  settled  in  the  city  of  Philadelphia,  one  near  Sun- 
bury,  Pa.,  and  the  other,  John  George,  in  Bem  (now  Upper  Bem)  township, 
Berks  county.  John  George  Rentschler  was  bom  Oct.  ii,  1755,  lived  for  many 
years  at  Hamburg,  Berks  county,  and  afterwards  followed  farming  and  dis- 
tilling near  that  place.  In  1785  he  married  Catherine  Wagoner,  born  Dec. 
23,  1765,  who  died  Jan.  2,  1847.  They  became  the  parents  of  teni  children, 
six  sons  and  four  daughters,  namely :  Daniel ;  George,  who  settled  out  West ; 
Samuel;  Elizabeth,  Mrs.  Peter  Phillips;  Jacob;  Mrs.  Christ.  Kauflfman;  Mrs. 
Joseph  Kauff man ;  and  three  others — two  sons  and  one  daughter. 

Jacob  Rentschler,  son  of  John  George  and  father  of  Dr.  Henry  D.  Rent- 
schler, was  bom  April  3,  1804,  on  the  old  homestead,  and  was  reared  in  Bem 
township.  He  was  a  farmer  and  also  owned  a  woolen  mill,  which  stood  upon 
his  farm,  the  buildings  being  still  there,  about  three  quarters  of  a  mile  from 
Upper  Bem  post  office.  He  manufactured  woolen  bedspreads  and  woolen 
goods  from  which  men's  and  women's  clothing  was  made,  and  in  his  time 
was  known  as  an  energetic,  hard-working  man.  In  about  middle  life  he  be- 
came paralyzed,  and  during  the  rest  of  his  life  he  was  lame.  He  died  at  Bem- 
ville  Jan.  28,  1874.  Mr.  Rentschler  was  twice  married,  his  first  wife  being 
Sarah  Fegley,  by  whom  he  had  four  children,  namely:  Charles  F.,  Fietta, 
Matilda  and  Frank.  His  second  wife  was  Sarah  Diehl,  who  died  in  1845, 
and  by  this  union  there  were  two  children :  Henry  D. ;  and  Lewis,  who  died 
in  1898,  in  his  forty-fifth  year. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  615 

Henry  D.  Rentschler  was  bom  May  S,  1841,  in  Upper  Bern  township, 
Berks  county,  and  there  acquired  his  preliminary  education  in  the  public 
schools,  which  he  attended  up  to  the  age  of  fifteen  years.  Then  he  was  a 
student  in  Washington  Hall  Seminary,  at  the  Trappe,  in  Montgomery  county. 
Pa.,  for  three  years,  and  he  began  his  medical  studies  in  the  office  of  Dr. 
Devilla  Schoener,  at  Shartlesville,  Berks  county.  Entering  the  medical  depart- 
ment of  the  University  of  Pennsylvania  in  1861,  he  was  graduated  in  1864, 
and  immediately  thereafter  settled  at  Ringtown,  Schpylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where 
he  has  since  had  his  home  and  field  of  practice.  His  work  has  been  general, 
and  his  patrons  during  his  active  years  were  scattered  over  a  wide  territory, 
the  country  adjacent  to  Ringtown  and  other  boroughs  in  this  part  of  the 
county  as  well  as  his  home  place.  He  is  an  honored  member  of  the  Schuylkill 
County  Medical  Society  and  of  the  Pennsylvania  State  Medical  Society,  and 
respected  by  his  contemporaries  in  the  profession  as  well  as  by  his 
patients.  His  public  services  have  a  large  place  in  the  records  of  his  section. 
For  twenty-eight  years  he  held  the  position  of  school  director  in  Union 
township  (before  Ringtown  was  incorporated  as  a  borough),  and  during 
twenty-one  years  also  acted  as  secretary  of  the  board,  where  his  recommenda- 
tions were  always  received  with  respect  and  his  opinions  sought  and  valued. 
In  1878  he  was  elected  coroner  of  the  county  and  filled  that  office  for  one 
term,  when  its  duties  were  both  responsible  and  dangerous  by  reason  of  the 
activities  of  the  Molly  Maguires.  Politically  he  has  always  given  his  sup- 
port to  the  Democratic  party. 

When  the  need  for  more  solid  financial  institutions  in  this  section  became 
apparent  Dr.  Rentschler  lent  his  aid  to  their  establishment,  having  been  one 
of  the  organizers  of  the  Merchants'  National  Bank  of  Shenandoah,  and  was  a 
director  of  same  for  twelve  years,  until  the  First  National  Bank  of  Ringtown 
came  into  existence,  in  1904.  He  was  interested  in  its  organization,  served  as 
vice  president  for  some  years,  and  is  now  president  of  the  institution,  which 
has  been  a  valuable  adjunct  to  the  business  activities  of  the  borough  and  sur- 
rounding country.  He  owns  a  farm  of  eighty-seven  and  a  half  acres  in  the 
borough,  turned  over  to  general  agriculture  and  fruit  growing. 

Fraternally  the  Doctor  affiliates  with  the  Odd  Fellows  and  Masons,  belong- 
ing to  Ringtown  Lodge,  No.  287,  I.  O.  O.  F. ;  to  Mahanoy  City  Lodge,  No. 
357,  F.  &  A.  M.;  Mizpah  Chapter,  No.  252,  R.  A.  M.,  of  Mahanoy  City 
(charter  member)  ;  and  Ivanhoe  Commandery,  No.  31,  K.  T.,  of  Mahanoy 
City.  He  and  his  wife  and  all  of  thtir  children  are  members  of  the  Lutheran 
Church. 

On  Feb.  15,  1869,  Dr.  Rentschler  was  married  to  Emmaline  Rumbel,  of 
Ringtown,  who  was  bom  there  Feb.  21,  1852,  and  received  her  education  in 
the  local  public  schools.  Eight  children  have  been  bom  to  this  marriage: 
Adalaide,  bom  Aug.  19,  1*870,  completed  a  course  in  the  Keystone  State  Nor- 
mal School,  at  Kutztown,  Pa.,  afterwards  studied  music  in  a  seminary  at 
Hagerstown,  and  was  organist  of  St.  John's  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  for 
years ;  she  is  now  the  wife  of  Dr.  George  R.  Shenk,  of  Reading,  Pa.,  and  has 
three  children,  Katherine  F.,  Florence  E.  and  Frederick  R.  Maurice  F.,  bom 
Aug.  19,  1872,  after  receiving  an  excellent  fundamental  education  entered  the 
University  of  Pennsylvania,  but  did  not  finish  the  course,  and  he  is  now 
engaged  in  the  confectionery  business  at  Ringtown ;  he  married  Sadie  Rumbel, 
daughter  of  Francis  Rumbel,  of  Ringtown,  and  their  children  are  Emmaline, 
Winifred,  Ralph  M.  and  Frederick.  Walter  R.,  bom  Oct.  12,  1874,  received 
his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Ringtown,  Bloomsburg  State  Normal 


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616  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

School  and  the  University  of  Pennsylvania  Medical  School,  which  he  entered 
in  1892,  graduating  in  1896,  since  when  he  has  been  in  practice  with  his 
father  at  Ringtown;  he  married  Edna  Hughes,  daughter  of  George  S.  and 
Emily  (Barrow)  Hughes,  of  Clearfield,  Pa.,  and  their  children  are  George 
Hughes,  Henry  D.,  Emily  B.,  Rebecca  R.  and  Isabelle  C.  Sadie  May,  bom 
Dec.  10,  1876,  graduated  from  the  Bloomsburg  State  Normal  School  and 
taught  school  at  Ringtown ;  she  was  organist  of  St.  John's  Evangelical  Luth- 
eran Church  for  over  ten  years;  she  died  Feb.  7,  1907,  when  thirty  years 
old.  Harry  J.,  bom  Dec.  16,  1878,  was  formerly  engaged  as  a  machinist  in 
the  hosiery  mills  at  Ringtown,  and  is  now  farming  there;  he  married  Pearl 
Fuhrman,  and  they  have  had  two  children,  Elizabeth  (deceased)  and  Fuhr- 
man  Henry.  Robert  F.,  bom  May  23,  1881,  graduated  from  the  Keystone 
State  Normal  School,  at  Kutztown,  Pa.,  taught  school  a  few  terms,  took  a 
course  in  a  commercial  college  at  Reading,  and  then  entered  the  employ  of  the 
E.  &  G.  Brooke  Iron  Company,  at  Birdsboro,  where  he  is  accountant;  he  is 
unmarried  and  makes  his  home  at  Reading.  Elizabeth  M.,  bom  Aug.  28, 
1883,  who  lives  at  home,  graduated  from  the  musical  department  of  the 
Bloomsburg  State  Normal  School,  and  has  taught  music  at  Ringtown,  where 
she  has  also  been  organist  in  the  church  since  1908.  Guy  H.,  bom  Sept.  i, 
1885,  is  a  graduate  of  the  Bloomsburg  State  Normal  School,  has  taken  courses 
at  Columbia  University,  New  York  City,  and  is  now  supervising  principal  of 
the  schools  of  Dunellen,  New  Jersey. 

Mrs.  Rentschler  belongs  to  an  old  family  of  Schuylkill  county,  being  a 
granddaughter  of  Henry  Rumbel,  who  was  bom  Oct.  31,  1801,  in  East  Bmns- 
wick  township,  this  county,  where  he  owned  land  near  Rauschs  which  he 
traded  for  property  in  Union  township,  acquiring  valuable  holdings.  He 
had  one  tract  principally  in  timber  (now  owned  by  Washington  Rumbel), 
cultivating  the  few  acres  which  were  cleared,  and  owned  another  which  he 
occupied  and  operated,  selling  the  latter  eventually  to  his  son  Henry.  He 
gave  each  of  his  sons  a  farm.  Mr.  Rumbel  was  independent  in  politics.  He 
was  known  for  his  high  Christian  character,  and  was  a  zealous  member  of 
the  Lutheran  congregation  of  the  Old  White  Church,  in  which  he  filled  all 
the  official  positions.  His  wife  belonged  to  the  Reformed  denomination.  Her 
maiden  name  was  Salome  Andrews,  and  she  was  born  Sept.  18,  1807.  Mr. 
Rumbel  died  Nov.  17,  1869,  Mrs.  Rumbel  on  May  20,  1887,  and  they  are 
buried  at  the  Old  White  Church.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following 
children:  Henry  married  Elizabeth  Singley;  Daniel  is  mentioned  below; 
Jacob  served  in  the  Civil  war,  was  wounded,  and  died  from  his  injuries; 
Joshua  married  Lucy  Singley;  Rebecca  married  William  Laudig;  Mary  mar- 
ried Levi  Reber. 

Daniel  Rumbel,  son. of  Henry,  was  bom  Dec.  24,  1830,  in  East  Bmnswick 
township,  this  county,  and  died  at  Ringtown  June  26,  189 1.  He  was  educated 
partly  in  his  native  township,  but  was  still  a  boy  when  the  family  moved  to 
Union  township,  where  he  finished  his  schooling.  During  most  of  his  early 
life  he  helped  his  father  on  the  farm,  continuing  thus  for  some  time  after  his 
marriage,  and  he  also  learned  the  trade  of  shoemaker.  In  time  he  bought  a 
farm  of  about  115  acres  from  his  father,  nearly  all  timbered,  cut  the  wood 
and  cleared  the  ground,  selling  his  lumber  to  the  Catawissa  Railroad  Com- 
pany, who  used  it  in  the  constmction  of  bridges  along  their  road.  Later  he 
sold  fifteen  acres  to  Jacob  Laudig,  retaining  the  remainder  for  himself  and 
carrying  on  general  farming  for  some  years.  He  sold  another  portion  of  this 
tract  to  the  Ringtown  Fair  Association  for  fair  grounds.     Below  Ringtown 


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SCHUYLKILt  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  617 

I 

he  owned  a  tract  of  fifty  acres  mostly  in  timber,  on  which  he  had  a  water- 
power  sawmill,  and  the  timber  cut  there  was  used  for  mining  and  building 
purposes.  His  general  farming  and  lumbering  operations  were  very  profitable, 
and  he  did  well,  but  he  was  too  good-natured  for  his  own  interest  about  going 
on  others'  bonds,  and  as  a  consequence  he  failed  financially,  his  property  being 
disposed  of  at  sheriff's  sale.  After  that  he  went  into  the  shoe  business  at 
Ringtown,  conducting  a  store  and  working  at  the  trade.  He  spent  his  later 
years  in  retirement  there. 

Mr.  Riunbel  married  Sarah  M.  Seltzer,  who  was  bom  Sept.  7,  1832,  in 
East  Brunswick  township,  and  they  had  three  children:  Emmaline,  wife  of 
Dr.  H.  D.  Rentschler,  of  Ringtown;  William  H.,  bom  Jan.  29,  1854,  who 
married  Louisa  Seitz;  and  Trenton  W.,  bom  in  October,  1856,  who  married 
Barbara  Maurer.  The  mother  died  Sept.  2,  1914,  and  both  parents  are  buried 
at  the  Old  White  Church.  Mr.  Rimibel  was  a  Lutheran  member  of  that 
church,  and  a  Republican  in  political  sentiment. 

SALEM  W.  KOCH,  who  has  valuable  mercantile  and  agricultural  in- 
terests near  Rauschs,  in  East  Brunswick  township,  has  been  one  of  the  most 
enterprising  residents  of  that  portion  of  Schuylkill  county  for  a  quarter  of  a 
century  and  more.  He  has  taken  a  hand  in  the  direction  of  township  affairs 
in  various  official  capacities,  and  his  personal  influence  has  always  been  felt 
as  a  distinct  force  for  progress.  In  church  and  social  affairs  he  has  also 
done  his  share,  helping  to  raise  the  standard  of  the  community  by  giving  en- 
couragement to  every  movement  whose  object  appealed  to  his  sympathies  as 
being  worthy  of  support.  He  is  a  native  of  East  Bmnswick  township,  bom 
Sept.  21,  1848,  son  of  William  W.  Koch  and  grandson  of  William  Koch. 

William  Koch,  the  grandfather,  lived  in  Schuylkill  county  from  early  life, 
and  followed  farming  in  East  Brunswick  township,  where  he  owned  a  farm 
of  180  acres,  no  acres  of  which  were  cleared  ground.  After  operating  this 
farm  for  some  years  he  sold  it  to  his  son,  William  W.,  and  it  is  now  the 
property  of  George  Zimmerman.  After  selling  his  farm  he  moved  to  Schuyl- 
kill Haven  and  was  a  boatbuilder  for  the  Schuylkill  Navigation  Company  for 
many  years  before  his  retirement.  He  died  in  that  place,  aged  ninety-two 
years.  Mr.  Koch  married  a  Miss  Bolich,  by  whom  he  had  the  following  chil- 
dren: William  W. ;  Daniel;  and  Kate,  who  married  John  Deibert.  For  his 
second  wife  he  married  Briggetta  Schaeffer,  who  was  from  Berks  county, 
and  they  had  one  child,  Lewis,  who  is  unmarried.  He  became  a  Republican, 
and  served  his  fellow  citizens  as  school  director.  Mr.  Koch  was  first  a  member 
of  Christ  Church  at  McKeansburg,'but  on  his  removal  to  Schuylkill  Haven 
became  a  member  of  the  German  Lutheran  Church  there.  He  and  his  sec- 
ond wife  are  buried  at  Schuylkill  Haven. 

William  W.  Koch,  father  of  Salem  W.  Koch,  was  educated  in  East 
Brunswick  township,  and  worked  for  his  father  until  he  was  twenty  years  old, 
when  he  married.  Then  he  bought  his  father's  farm  and  operated  that  place 
for  eight  years,  when  he  sold  it  and  bought  the  mill  property  which  Jonas 
Kunkel  now  owns.  He  conducted  the  property  for  eight  years,  when  he  sold 
out  and  removed  to  Lewisburg,  Union  Co.,  Pa.,  remaining  there  one  year. 
Then  he  removed  to  Selinsgrove,  Snyder  Co.,  Pa.,  and  bought  a  property,  but 
held  it  only  one  year,  when  he  sold  and  removed  to  East  Brunswick  township 
and  bought  the  mill  property  now  owned  by  EHas  Bachert.  At  that  time  the 
property  was  known  as  the  Weaver  property.  Mr.  Koch  operated  the  mill 
and  farm  for  eight  years,  when  the  mill  bumed  down  and  he  sold  the  property 


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618  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

to  EHas  Bachert.  Then  he  removed  to  New  Ringgold  and  from  there  to 
Rauschs,  where  he  lived  retired.  He  was  killed  accidentally  on  the  Lehigh 
Valley  railroad  about  a  mile  from  his  home,  when  on  his  way  to  go  fishing. 
He  married  Catherine  Kershner,  a  daughter  of  William  B.  and  Elizabeth 
(Seltzer)  Kershner,  and  they  had  three  children:  Oliver,  who  is  deceased; 
Salem  W. ;  and  Wesley  W.,  who  conducts  a  hotel  at  Mohnton,  Berks  Co., 
Pa.,  his  mother,  now  eighty-nine  years  old,  making  her  home  with  him  (he 
married  Hannah  Hartman).  Mr.  Koch  was  a  Republican  and  was  elected 
school  director.  He  joined  the  Church  of  God  at  Steigerwalt,  McKeansburg, 
and  was  an  active  church  member.  He  is  buried  in  Christ  Church  cemetery 
at  McKeansburg. 

Salem  W.  Koch  started  his  education  in  East  Brunswick  township,  later 
attending  the  seminary  at  Collegeville  and  Lewisburg  Academy.  He  pre- 
pared himself  for  teaching,  and  taught  one  term  at  Selinsgrove,  Snyder 
county,  after  which  he  came  to  East  Brunswick  township,  and  worked  in  his 
father's  mill  (now  the  Bachert  mill),  also  operating  the  sawmill  and  assisting 
on  the  fanxi.  Later  he  engaged  in  the  general  store  business  in  New  Ring- 
gold, where  he  remained  five  years,  after  which  he  removed  to  Rauschs  Sta- 
tion and  bought  his  father-in-law's  farm  of  eighty-six  acres.  He  still  owns 
the  same  and  has  added  to  his  holdings,  having  bought  a  tract  of  eighty  acres 
and  later  one  of  fifty-five  acres  from  the  Bachert  land.  All  told  he  had  no 
acres  under  cultivation.  Mr.  Koch  devoted  himself  to  the  operation  of  his 
farm  for  a  while,  and  when  the  Lehigh  Valley  railroad  was  built  through  that 
section  he  put  up  his  present  store  building,  where  he  has  done  a  general  mer- 
cantile business  for  the  last  twenty-four  years.  His  son  Luther  now  manages 
the  farm.  He  is  a  substantial  man  in  his  community  and  a  good  citizen.  He 
has  been  closely  associated  with  the  township  government,  having  served  as 
auditor;  for  four  years  as  supervisor;  ten  years  as  justice  of  the  peace;  and 
twenty-four  years  as  school  director,  also  acting  as  secretary  of  the  board 
throughout  that  period.  As  a  worker  of  recognized  value  in  the  Republican 
party  he  has  been  township  committeeman  fifteen  years,  and  has  served  as 
inspector  of  elections. 

Mr.  Koch  has  numerous  social  connections.  He  is  a  member  of  East 
Brunswick  Lodge,  No.  802,  I.  O.  O.  P.,  of  New  Ringgold,  and  is  a  past  grand ; 
a  member  of  Washington  Camp  No.  100,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  of  New  Ringgold, 
and  a  past  president,  and  has  been  delegate  to  county  and  State  conventions ; 
belongs  to  Protection  Council,  No.  935,  Order  of  Independent  Americans, 
McKeansburg,  and  is  a  past  councilor.  In  religion  he  is  a  Lutheran,  a  member 
of  the  Frieden's  Church  at  New  Ringgold,  and  he  has  taken  a  leading  part  in 
the  church  and  Sunday  school  affairs.  He  was  deacon  Tor  many  years ;  secre- 
tary of  the  church  council  from  twenty-four  years  of  age  until  1913;  superin- 
tendent of  the  Sunday  school  for  several  years;  and  was  also  superintendent 
of  the  Bachert  Sunday  school  for  some  time. 

Mr.  Koch  married  Maria  BoHch,  who  was  bom  Oct.  11,  1848,  a  daughter 
of  William  and  Mary  (Sechler)  Bolich,  the  latter  coming  from  Lehigh  county. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Koch  have  had  six  children:  Luther  Martin  married  Laura 
Hartman  and  they  have  three  children,  Mildred  Emma,  Salem  Hartman  and 
Roberta  Maria;  Mary  Catherine  married  W.  M.  Miller,  of  Topton,  Pa.,  and 
has  one  child,  Bessie  Florence ;  Emma  Elizabeth  married  George  G.  Shick,  of 
Pottsville,  Pa.,  and  has  three  children,  Catherine  Koch,  Salem  Henry  and 
Bemon  George ;  Salem  W.,  William  B.  and  Oliver  are  deceased. 

John  Bolich,  Mrs.  Koch's  grandfather,  farmed  in  East  Brunswick  towur 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  619 

ship,  where  he  owned  about  three  hundred  acres  of  land.  He  followed  gen- 
eral farming  throughout  his  active  years,  but  retired  many  years  before  his 
death,  which  occurred  when  he  was  eighty-four  years  old.  His  wife,  Susan 
(Fisher),  died  at  the  age  of  fifty,  and  they  are  buried  in  the  cemetery  of  the 
Frieden's  Lutheran  Church,  of  which  organization  they  were  members.  Polit- 
ically he  was  a  Republican.  Theif  children  were  as  follows :  John  married 
Hannah  Sechler;  George  married  Priscilla  Wanamaker;  Daniel  married  Eliz- 
abeth Sechler;  Samuel  did  not  marry;  William  married  Mary  Sechler;  Ben- 
jamin married  Mary  Reinhard;  Joseph  married  Sarah  Oswald;  Susan  mar- 
ried Joseph  Alspach;  Kate  married  Jesse  Sechler;  Hannah  married  Charles 
Dreher ;  Mary  married  Jacob  Steinmetz ;  Diana  and  Sarah  never  married. 

William  Bolich  was  bom  July  12,  1820,  in  East  Brunswick  township,  and 
was  educated  there.  He  worked  for  his  father  on  the  farm  for  some  time 
and  before  his  father's  death  bought  about  eighty  acres  of  the  place,  later  pur- 
chasing another  farm  of  100  acres,  to  which  he  removed.  He  cultivated  that 
tract  until  his  death,  which  occurred  when  he  was  aged  fifty-seven  years. 
He  was  actively  interested  in  politics  as  a  member  of  the  Republican  party, 
served  as  school  director,  and  belonged  to  the  Frieden's  Lutheran  Church  at 
New  Ringgold ;  he  is  buried  in  the  cemetery  of  that  church.  Mr.  Bolich  mar- 
ried Mary  Sechler,  who  was  bom  March  10,  1823,  in  Lynn  township,  Lehigh 
county,  daughter  of  Jacob  Sechler,  whose  wife's  maiden  name  was  Fussel- 
man.  Mrs.  Bolich  survives  her  husband,  making  her  home  with  her  daughter, 
Mrs.  Bauscher.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bolich  had  three  children:  Charles  married 
Sarah  Kindt,  of  New  Ringgold,  Pa. ;  Maria  married  Salem  Koch,  of  Rauschs, 
Schuylkill  county ;  Emma  is  Mrs.  David  Bauscher. 

WESLEY  A.  SELTZER  belongs  to  two  families  of  old  and  honorable 
standing  in  Schuylkill  county,  being  connected  in  the  maternal  line  with  thp 
Albrights,  whose  name  has  long  been  associated  with  high  qualities  of  char- 
acter, for  which  its  representatives  have  been  known. 

The  Seltzers  were  first  established  in  Berks  county,  Pa.,  after  their  emigra- 
tion to  America.  Jacob  Seltzer  emigrated  in  the  year  1752  from  the  upper 
Rhein,  near  Coblentz,  in  the  vicinity  of  the  famous  "Seltzer  Springs"  in  Ger- 
many, where  he  was  bom  in  1732.  He  settled  in  Heidelberg  township  (where 
afterwards  Womelsdorf  was  laid  out),  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  and  became  a  natural- 
ized citizen  in  1765.  Several  years  before  (in  1762)  he  had  established  a 
hotel  in  the  village,  which  has  been  known  until  the  present  time  as  the  "Selt- 
zer House."  He  died  in  1788.  He  was  married  to  Maria  Catharine  Hiester, 
of  Bern  township,  who  was  bom  in  1735  and  died  in  1817.  By  her  he  had  six 
children:^  Jacob,  who  married  Catharine  Kauffman;  Michael,  who  enlisted 
in  the  Revolution  and  died  of  fever  shortly  befbre  the  end  of  his  term  of 
service ;  Elizabeth,  who  married  Dr.  Michael  Tryon,  a  prominent  physician  of 
Tulpehocken;  Mary,  who  married  Jacob  Spang,  a  prominent  ironmaster  of 
Oley;  Catharine,  who  married  David  Dewees;  and  a  daughter  who  married 
Christopher  Reed. 

Jacob  Seltzer  was  bom  in  1764  at  Womelsdorf,  where  he  carried  on  farm- 
ing and  kept  hotel  until  his  decease  in  1825.  He  was  married  to  Catharine 
Kauffman  (daughter  of  Jacob,  of  Oley),  bom  in  1766  and  died  in  1842,  and 
by  her  he  had  eight  children :  William  married  Catharine  Ruth ;  John  married 
Mary  Van  Reed:  Daniel  married  a  Weiser;  David  married  Eliza  O.  Sheetz 
and  moved  to  Ohio;  Jacob  married  a  Hassinger;  Michael  married  Catherine 
Hain;  Anna  remained  single;  Elizabeth  married  George  See. 


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620  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Michael  Seltzer,  great-grandfather  of  Wesley  Seltzer,  served  in  the  Revo- 
lutionary war,  and  was  at  Valley  Forge.  He  w^s  taken  prisoner  and  con- 
fined with  others  in  an  old  stone  church,  where  he  starved  to  death.  His 
children  were  Abraham,  John  and  Jacob. 

Abraham  Seltzer,  son  of  Michael,  was  bom  in  Berks  county,  Pa.,  and  was 
an  early  settler  in  East  Brunswick  township,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  fol- 
lowed farming  at  Drehersville  until  his  death,  which  occurred  there.  For  a 
number  of  years  he  kept  hotel  at  that  point,  besides  following  agricultural 
pursuits.  He  lived  to  the  age  of  ninety-one  years,  and  his  wife,  whose  maiden 
name  was  Catherine  Faust,  is  buried  with  him  at  the  Red  Church.  They  had 
the  following  family:  Joseph,  Elizabeth,  Michael,  Susan,  Polly,  Catherine, 
Rebecca  and  Nathan.  One  married  Daniel  Ebling;  another  Edw.  Ebling; 
Michael  married  Mary  Frey;  Nathan  married  Catherine  Albright;  Joseph 
went  West,  where  he  died ;  Mrs.  Reuben  Miller  lived  in  the  West. 

Nathan  Seltzer,  son  of  Abraham,  was  bom  in  December,  1827,  in  East 
Brunswick  township,  and  died  at  the  early  age  of  thirty-three.  He  was  a 
successful  business  man,  following  farming,  and  kept  an  inn  at  Drehersville 
for  a  time,  also  carrying  on  a  general  mercantile  business  at  that  point.  He 
was  a  member  of  the  Reformed  Church,  and  is  buried  at  the  Red  Church. 
Politically  he  was  a  Democrat.  His  wife,  Catherine,  was  a  daughter  of  Peter 
Albright,  of  West  Bmnswick  township,  and  four  children  were  bom  to  this 
union:  Elizabeth,  Wesley  A.,  Oscar  and  Mary,  all  deceased  but  Wesley. 
Mrs.  Seltzer  remarried,  becoming  the  wife  of  John  Walbom,  but  had  no 
children  by  that  union. 

Wesley  A.  Seltzer  was  born  Jan.  22,  1865,  2tt  Drehersville,  East  Brunswick 
township.  Being  only  four  years  old  when  his  father  died  he  was  reared  by 
his  grandfather,  Peter  Albright,  meantime  attending  the  public  schools  of  the 
locality.  He  assisted  his  grandfather  with  the  farm  work  until  he  reached 
his  majority,  and  from  that  time  farmed  on  shares,  also  conducting  a  lime 
quarry.  He  continued  to  carry  on  his  agricultural  work  and  quarrying  for 
twenty-one  years  in  all,  and  in  1894  removed  to  Orwigsburg',  where  he  pur- 
chased the  Jacob  Hiest  farm,  a  valuable  tract  of  135  acres,  included  within 
the  borough  limits.  Under  Mr.  Seltzer's  management  during  the  twenty  years 
and  more  of  his  ownership  it  has  undergone  steady  improvement,  and  is  up-to- 
date  in  every  respect,  having  reached  a  fine  state  of  cultivation.  Mr.  Seltzer 
has  erected  a  house  upon  the  land,  which  he  rents.  His  time  has  always 
been  given  to  business,  and  he  is  known  as  one  of  the  most  progressive  agricul- 
turalists of  his  vicinity.  He  is  a  director  of  the  South  Schuylkill  Farmers' 
Fire  Insurance  Company,  which  he  has  been  serving  as  treasurer  for  some 
time.  Politically  he  is  a  Republican,  but  has  never  taken  any  part  in  public 
affairs.    His  religious  connection  is  with  the  Reformed  Church. 

In  1874  Mr.  Seltzer  married  Joanna  Hoy,  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Elizabeth 
(Faust)  Hoy,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  the  following  named  children: 
Frank  P.,  now  engaged  in  farming  in  North  Manheim  township,  this  county; 
Mary,  who  lives  at  home ;  Anna,  who  taught  school  for  a  time,  now  married 
and  living  in  Orwigsburg;  Catherine,  wife  of  John  Williams,  living  at  Pine 
Grove  Fumace,  Cumberland  county.  Pa. ;  John  W.,  living  at  Franklin  Fumace, 
N.  J. ;  George  I.,  now  in  New  York  State ;  Edward,  a  student  at  State  Col- 
lege ;  and  Albert,  at  home. 

JOHN  PFEIFFER,  of  Tower  City,  is  one  of  the  substantial  business 
men  of  his  section  of  Schuylkill  county.     His  own  success  would  be  sufli- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  621 

dent  to  justify  his  faith  in  the  county  as  a  field  for  investment,  and  he  has 
been  among  the  promoters  and  supporters  of  some* of  the  most  progressive 
enterprises  set  on  foot  within  the  last  twenty  years,  taking  a  public-spirited 
pride  in  securing  for  his  locality  the  benefits  afforded  by  the  various  con- 
cerns in  which  he  is  interested.  Mr.  PfeiflFef  is  a  native  of  Germany  and' a 
typical  member  of  his  race,  thorough-going,  self-reliant,  persevering  and  in- 
dustrious. It  is  to  these  solid  characteristics  that  his  many  friends  in  the 
valley  ascribe  the  good  fortune  he  now  enjoys. 

Mr.  Pfeiffer  was  bom  in  Germany  Oct.  26,  1864,  son  of  Daniel  Pfeiffer, 
also  a  native  of  that  country.  He  brought  his  family  to  America  in  1882  and 
settled  at  Middleport,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  In  the  old  country  he  had  been 
variously  employed,  and  here  he  was  engaged  for  a  time  in  coal  washing,'  at 
Brockton.  Then  he  followed  farming,  until  his  retirement.  His  death 
occurred  at  Middlpport,  where  his  wife,  Elizabeth  (Pabst),  also  passed  away, 
and  they  are  both  buried  there.  They  had  the  following  children:  Jacob, 
John,  Daniel,  Frederick,  Henry,  Lewis,  Charles,  and  Lena  (who  married 
George  W.  Miller). 

John  Pfeiffer  received  his  education  in  the  Fatherland,  being  eighteen 
years  old  when  he  accompanied  the  family  to  America.  He  had  learned  the 
trade  of  stone  cutter,  and  after  his  arrival  in  Schuylkill  county  was  em- 
ployed for  ten  years  at  the  mines  and  on  the  railroad.  By  that  time  he  felt 
justified  in  starting  business  on  his  own  account,  and  he  opened  the  general 
store  at  Tower  City  which  he  has  conducted  ever  since,  having  one  of  the 
best  managed  establishments  in  the  town.  The  trade  has  increased  steadily, 
and  Mr.  Pfeiffer  has  given  his  patrons  the  benefit  of  his  prosperity,  im- 
proving his  stock  and  facilities  not  only  as  the  trade  demands,  but  usually 
in  advance  of  its  needs.  His  merchandise  is  of  reliable  quality,  the  service 
is  prompt  and  courteous,  and  no  detail  is  nedected  to  insure  satisfaction  to  all 
customers.  Mr.  Pfeiffer  also  owns  the  'Conmiercial  Hotel,"  carrying  a 
retail  license,  and  he  has  considerable  valuable  real  estate  at  Tower  City  and 
in  Porter  township.  He  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  Consolidated  Elec- 
tric Company  which  supplies  light  to  New  Philadelphia,  Middleport,  Cum- 
bola  and  Schuylkill  township,  and  also  to  Blythe  township,  and  whose  plant 
was  sold  July  i,  19 15,  to  the  Eastern  Pennsylvania  Light,  Heat  &  Power  Com- 
pany. He  was  one  of  the  first  stockholders  in  the  Tower  City  National  Bank, 
organized  in  1902,  and  has  been  a  director  since  1914.  He  also  helped  to 
organize  the  Electric  Light  Company  at  Tower  City,  which  has  since  been 
sold.  Mr.  Pfeiffer  is  a  director  of  the  Williamstown  Water  Company  and 
the  Wiconisco  Telephone  Company.  The  only  public  office  he  has  ever  con- 
sented to  fill  is  that  of  supervisor  of  Porter  township. 

Mr.  Pfeiffer  married  Emma  Ida  Miller,  daughter  of  Thomas  Miller,  and 
they  have  three  children,  Ella,  Charles  and  John.  He  and  his  family  belong 
to  the  Reformed  Church.  Socially  he  is  a  Mason,  holding  membership  in 
Ashler  Lodge,  No.  570,  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Lykens,  Pa.,  and  he  also  belongs  to 
the  Moose  lodge  at  that  place;  to  Tower  City  Lodge,  No.  755,  I.  O.  O.  F. ; 
and  to  the  Knights  of  the  Golden  Eagle. 

WILLIAM  FRANKLIN  FUHRMAN,  present  burgess  of  the  borough 
of  Ringtown,  has  been  actively  engaged  in  business  there  for  a  number  of 
years,  following  various  lines.  His  principal  interests  now  are  in  the  line 
of  carpentry,  and  the  steady  demand  for  his  services  bears  indisputable  testi- 
mony to  his  good  workmanship  and  conscientious  fulfillment  of  every  obliga- 


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622  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANLA 

tion.  In  his  public  duties  he  has  been  equally  faithful,  showing  a  sincere 
desire  to  promote  the  best  interests  of  the  town  where  his  unselfish,  progress- 
ive spirit  is  proving  an  influential  element  for  good. 

Mr.  Fuhrman  was  bom  Jan.  30,  1861,  in  Union  township,  Schuylkill 
county,  son  of  Lewis  Fuhrman,  also  a  native  of  Union  township,  who  was 
occupied  at  farming  and  lumbering.  During  the  Civil  war  Lewis  Fuhrman 
enlisted  at  Ringtown,  this  county,  for  three  years,  served  his  full  term,  and 
received  an  honorable  discharge  at  Harrisburg,  Pa.  He  died  in  July,  1869, 
and  is  buried  at  the  old  White  Church  near  Ringtown,  In  religion  he  was  a 
Lutheran,  in  politics  a  Democrat.  Mr.  Fuhrman  married  Susanna  LindAi- 
muth,  who  was  bom  in  October,  1838,  in  Union  township,  where  she  received 
her  education.  Her  father,  John  Lindenmuth,  was  a  farmer  in  that  town-' 
ship,  owning  a  tract  of  over  one  hi^ndred  acres,  part  of  which  he  cleared; 
there  was  a  great  deal  of  valuable  timber  on  his  land.  He  belonged  to  the 
Lutheran  Church,  and  was'  a  I>emocrat  on  political  questions.  He  and  his 
wife  Hannah  (Ponnebecker)  are  buried  in  a  private  graveyard  in  Union 
township.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children :  Elizabeth,  wife 
of  Frank  Rhoades;  Jacob,  who  married  Catherine  Ulshaffer;  William,  who 
was  twice  married,  his  second  wife  being  Eliza  Diliplarte;  Rachel,  wife  of 
Daniel  Rhoades ;  Polly,  wife  of  Daniel  Zimmerman ;  Amanda,  wife  of  Peter 
Fry;  and  Susan,  Mrs.  Fuhrman. 

Mrs.  Susan  Fuhrman,  widow  of  Lewis  Fuhrman,  resides  in  Ringtown 
borough.  Six  children  were  bom  to  them :  Caroline,  who  lives  in  Allentown, 
Pa. ;  William  F. ;  Amanda,  wife  of  Samuel  Miller,  living  at  Black  Hills,  near 
McAdoo,  Schuylkill  county;  Barbara,  deceased;  Hannah,  deceased,  who  was 
the  wife  of  George  Titus,  of  Rush  township,  Schuylkill  county;  and  Henry, 
of  Ringtown,  Pennsylvania. 

William  F.  Fuhrman  attended  the  Home  and  Lindner  schoolhouses  in 
Union  township,  but  as  he  was  only  eight  years  old  when  his  father  died  he 
began  work  when  yet  a  boy,  helping  his  mother.  He  was  employed  by 
neighboring  farmers  until  twelve  years  old,  when  he  went  to  work  in  the 
breaker  of  the  colliery  at  Raven  Run,  this  county,  later  doing  inside  tasks, 
firing  and  running  engines,  etc.  He  remained  there  until  nearly  thirty  years 
old,  when  he  entered  the  employ  of  Peter  Dresher,  as  teamster  in  his  lumber 
woods  and  as  wood  chopper,  continuing  with  him  two  years.  For  four  years 
afterwards  he  was  in  the  hotel  business  at  Ringtown  on  his  own  account,  first 
as  proprietor  of  the  **Eagle  Hotel"  and  later  of  another  house.  He  also 
acquired  manufacturing  interests  in  the  borough,  being  one  of  the  stockhold- 
ers of  the  Ringtown  Knitting  Mills,  which  he  operated  for  a  couple  of  years, 
later  selling  out  and  renting  the  farm  of  Dr.  H.  D.  Rentschler,  in  Ringtown, 
which  he  conducted  for  four  years.  After  the  death  of  his  father-in-law, 
Samuel  Dresher,  he  bought  the  latter's  farm,  but  never  operated  that  prop- 
erty, which  he  sold  later  to  Elmer  Dennison,  the  present  owner.  In  1905 
Mr.  Fuhrman  bought  the  William  Snyder  farm  in  Union  township,  which  he 
cultivated  for  one  year,  later  selling  the  place  to  Jonathan  Hetherington,  who 
in  tum  sold  it  to  the  present  owner,  Benjamin  Zimmerman.  Mr.  Fuhrman, 
however,  retained  eight  building  lots  from  the  Snyder  tract,  and  has  disposed 
of  six  of  them,  still  holding  two.  He  also  owns  a  seventy-foot  (  front)  lot  in 
Ringtown  upon  which  he  has  erected  a  fine  double  dwelling  house,  which 
he  occupies.  For  a  number  of  years  past  he  has  been  devoting  his  energies 
principally  to  the  carpenter's  trade,  and  he  has  a  large  number  of  patrons  in 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  623 

the  borough  and  vicinity.  From  time  to  time  Mr.  Fuhrman  has  acquired 
other  interests,  having  been  one  of  the  first  directors  of  the  First  National 
Bank  of  Ringtown,  in  which  capacity  he  is  still  serving ;  he  attends  the  direct- 
ors' meetings  regularly.  '' 

For  some  years  Mr.  Fuhrman  has  kept  in  close  touch  with  local  public 
affairs,  having  served  as  election  inspector  in  Union  township  before  Ring- 
town  was  incorporated  as  a  borough,  and  he  has  earned  a  well  merited  repu- 
tation for  reliable  service  in  public  trusts.  In  19 13  he  was  honored  as  the 
choice  of  the  townspeople  for  the  office  of  burgess,  being  the  second  incum- 
bent of  that  important  position  since  the  incorporation  of  the  borough.  His 
official  acts  have  been  such  as  to  hold  the  allegiance  of  his  original  sup- 
porters and  gain  him  many  new  friends.  Mr.  Fuhrman  has  also  been 
active  in  other  local  interests,  being  a  member  of  Ringtown  Castle,  No.  500, 
Knights  of  the  Golden  Eagle,  and  of  the  Ringtown  Lutheran  Church;  many 
years  ago  he  served  as  superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school  held  in  Home's 
school  in  Union  township. 

Mr.  Fuhrman  married  Elizabeth  Dresher,  who  was  bom  Feb.  23,  1861, 
in  Union  township,  where  she  received  her  education,  remaining  at  home  until 
her  marriage.  She  is  an  eamest  member  of  the  Ringtown  Lutheran  Church 
and  of  its  Ladies'  Aid  Society.  Two  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Fuhrman:  Pearl  May,  the  daughter,  bom  Oct.  17,  1887,  received  an  ex- 
cellent education  in  the  public  schools,  graduating  from  the  Ringtown  high 
school,  taught  school  for  three  years  in  Union  township,  and  is  now  the  wife 
of  Harry  Rentschler,  a  farmer,  of  Ringtown;  they  have  had  two  children, 
Elizabeth  Alice  (born  Dec.  26,  1912,  deceased)  and  Fuhrman  Henry  (bom 
Nov.  24,  1913).  Samuel  Robert,  son  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  F.  Fuhrman, 
bom  June  2,  1891,  was  educated  in  the  local  public  schools  and  at  the  Blooms- 
burg  (Pa.)  State  Normal  School,  attending  the  latter  for  one  term;  he  was 
an  employe  of  the  Hooven  Mercantile  Company  at  Shenandoah  at  the  time  of 
his  death,  Aug.  6,  191 3. 

George  Dresher,  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Fuhrman,  was  a  native  of  Ger- 
many. Coming  to  America  he  settled  in  Black  Creek  township,  Luzeme 
Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  farmed  the  rest  of  his  life,  and  he  is  buried  there 
with  his  second  wife.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Lutheran  Church.  He 
was  twice  married,  and  had  five  children  by  the  first  union:  Samuel;  Polly, 
Mrs.  Henry  Hetler;  Katie,  Mrs.  Joseph  Mostellor;  Elizabeth,  Mrs.  Aaron 
Mostellor;  and  Lydia,  Mrs.  Paul  Huntsinger.  To  the  second  marriage  were 
bom:  George,  John  and  Henry  all  went  West;  Stephen  married  Mary  Etta 
Link;  Susan  married  Charles  Baer;  Sallie  married  Jeremiah  Spiegel. 

Samuel  Dresher,  father  of  Mrs.  Fuhrman,  was  born  Sept.  25,  181 5,  in 
Mifflin  township,  Columbia  Co.,  Pa.,  was^  reared  and  educated  in  that  county, 
and  became  a  prosperous  farmer,  owning  three  farms,  one  in  Mifflin  town- 
ship, Columbia  county,  and  two  in  Union  township,  Schuylkill  county.  When 
he  came  to  this  county  he  settled  on  his  large  tract,  which  comprised  325  acres, 
then  in  the  woods.  He  cleared  a  considerable  portion  of  that  property  and 
carried  on  general  farming  for  a  number  of  years,  butf  eventually  gave  up 
agriculture,  renting  out  his  farms,  and  for  some  time  conducted  the  "Eagle 
Hotel"  in  Ringtown,  owning  the  hotel  property.  When  he  withdrew  from 
that  business  he  rented  the  hotel  and  bought  a  dwelling  in  Ringtown  where 
he  spent  the  rest  of  his  life  in  retirement.  He  died  March  17,  1897,  and  his 
325-acre   farm  was  subsequently  divided  into  three  parts  and  sold;  these 


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624  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

parts  are  now  owned  by  Harry  Shenk,  Frank  Lebenburg  and  the  Girard 
Estate,  respectively.  Mr.  Dresher's  other  Union  township  farm  is  now 
owned  by  Ehner  Dennison.  Mr.  Dresher  was  actively  interested  in  local 
affairs,  being  a  well  known  member  of  the  Democratic  party,  tax  collector  of 
his  township,  and  a  prominent  worker  in  the  Lutheran. Church  of  Ringtown. 
He  is  buried  at  the  old  White  Church  near  Ringtown  with  his  first  wife, 
Elizabeth  (Hetler),  who  was  bom  in  Mifflin  township,  Columbia  county, 
and  died  at  the  age  of  thirty-six  years,  when  her  daughter  Mrs.  Fuhrman  was 
an  infant.  Her  father,  Peter  Hetler,  was  a  farmer  in  Mifflin  township,  and 
he  and  his-  wife  are  buried  at  Mifflinville,  Columbia  county.  He  was  a  Demo- 
crat in  politics.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hetler  had  two  children,  the  other  being  a 
son  Henry,  who  married  Polly  Dresher.  By  his  first  wife  Mr.  Dresher  had 
the  following  children:  Savina,  Mahala,  Mary  Ann,  Sydney  Frances  and 
Boyd  (who  married  Emma  Bitting,  now  a  resident  of  Ringtown)  are  all 
deceased;  Peter  married  Sallie  Hetherington;  George  married  Carolina  Fry; 
Elizabeth  is  the  wife  of  William  F.  Fuhrman.  For  his  second  wife  Mr. 
Dresher  married  Anna  Lindermuth,  daughter  of  Michael  and  Nima  (Miller) 
Lindermuth,  and  she  survives  him,  being  now  (191 5)  about  seventy-five  years 
old.  To  this  union  were  bom  children  as  follows:  Henry  married  Lizzie 
Seltzer,  and  they  make  their  home  at  Berwick,  Pa. ;  Santharella  married  Wil- 
liam Long,  and  both  are  deceased;  David,  a  resident  of  Ringtown,  Pa.,  mar- 
ried Adeline  Brown ;  Charles,  of  Girardville,  this  county,  married  Sallie  Schap- 
pell;  Anna  is  the  wife  of  Irwin  Seltzer,  of  Union  township;  Nima  is  the  wife 
of  Luther  Stauflfer,  of  Ringtown;  Emma  married  Fred  Jay,  of  Philadelphia, 
Pa.;  Fannie  married  Charles  Richards;  Ida  married  George  Bamhart,  of 
Girardville,  Pennsylvania. 

H.  J.  HERBEIN,  D.  D.  S.,  the  subject  of  this  sketch,  was  bom  in  Bern 
township,  Berks  county,  son  of  Dr.  J.  S.  and  Elizabeth  A.  R.  (Winter)  Her- 
bein,  grandson  of  John  Herbein,  who  removed  to  Bem  township  from  Oley 
township,  Berks  county,  where  the  progenitor  of  the  Herbein  family  in  Penn- 
sylvania located  in  171 7.  He  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Bem  town- 
ship, and  Sinking  Springs,  Berks  county,  and  in  Bmnner's  Scientific  Academy, 
Reading,  Pa.  After  teaching  in  the  public  schools  of  Berks  county  for  several 
terms.  Eh*.  Herbein  took  up  the  study  of  dentistry,  in  the  Dental  Department 
of  the  University  of  Pennsylvania;  and  was  graduated  from  that  institution, 
April  13,  1883,  with  the  d^ree  of  Doctor  of  Dental  Surgery.  After  practicing 
for  three  years  as  assistant  in  the  office  of  Dr.  E.  Slegel,  Reading,  Pa.,  he 
opened  an  office  in  Pottsville,  in  March,  1886,  where  he  has  continued  in  the 
active  practice  of  his  profession  to  the  present  time. 

Dr.  Herbein  is  a  member  of  the  Pennsylvania  State  Dental  Society,  the 
Schuylkill  County  Dental  Society  and  the  Lebanon  Valley  Dental  Association, 
serving  as  Secretary  of  the  last  named  organization  for  twenty-five  consecu- 
tive years,  and  as  President  in  191 1.  As  a  charter  member  of  the  Historical 
Society,  he  served  as  librarian  of  the  Society,  from  its  organization,  in  1903, 
until  1912,  when  he  was  elected  secretary,  which  office  he  filled  until  191 5. 

In  November,  1912,  he  received  the  appointment  of  Local  Registrar  of 
the  Pottsville  District  of  the  Pennsylvania  Department  of  Health;  at  the 
same  time  he  was  elected  secretary  to  the  Board  of  Health  of  Pottsville, 
which  offices  he  still  holds. 

Residing  in  one  of  the  finest  fossil  fields  in  the  country.  Dr.  Herbein  has 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  625 

devoted  his  leisure  time  to  the  collection  of  Coal  Flora,  and  has  a  large  col- 
lection of  typical  specimens  of  coal  fossils,  as  well  as  a  very  unique  collec- 
tion of  fossil  reptilian  foot  tracks  from  the  Mauch  Chunk  Red  Shales  in  the 
vicinity  of  Potts ville. 

In  1893,  Dr.  Herbein  was  married  to  Miss  Bertha  M.  Stichter,  of  Potts- 
ville,  taking  as  a  residence  and  dental  office  the  residence,  No.  407  Garfield 
Square,  Pottsville,  where,  with  their  family  of  three  daughters  and  one  son, 
they  still  reside. 

GEORGE  HOFF  STICHTER.  With  the  band  of  pioneers  who  blazed 
the  trail  through  the  wilds  of  Schuylkill  county,  Pa.,  in  the  year  1827,  there 
was  one  young  man  who  had  just  reached  his  majority,  by  the  name  of  George 
Hoff  Stichter,  son  of  Peter  Stichter.  He  was  bom  in  Reading,  Berks  Co., 
Pa.,  Feb.  13,  1805,  and  was  educated  in  a  private  night  school  which  he 
attended  after  the  day's  labor.  He  learned  the  trade  of  tinsmith  with  his 
cousin,  John  Stichter,  of  Pottsville,  Pa.  In  1829,  upon  the  death  of  John 
Stichter,  he  purchased  the  good-will  and"  interest  in  the  stove  and  tin  busi- 
ness from  the  estate,  and  branched  out  very  extensively,  employing  twelve 
to  fifteen  journeymen  in  his  factory,  all  hand  work,  and  using  three  teams 
on  the  road  to  sell  the  finished  product  north,  east,  south  and  west. 

George  H.  Stichter  was  a  natural-bom  mechanic  and  inventor.  In  1831 
he  patented  an  improvement  on  the  first  cook  stove.  In  1832  he  designed  and 
patented  the  cylinder  stove  now  in  use.  In  1833  he  patented  and  manu- 
factured the  first  heating  stove  for  house  use  to  burn  coal  in  the  United 
States.  Up  to  then  grates  walled  in  were  used  exclusively.  In  1845  he 
added  hardware  to  his  stove  and  tin  business,  and  continued  in  active  life 
until  1876,  when  he  retired,  dying  May  4,  1887.  He  served  as  county  com- 
missioner from  1845  to  1848,  as  school  director,  councilman  and  tax  collector, 
was  a  member  of  the  old  Schuylkill  County  Troop  in  the  thirties  and  forties, 
and  a  charter  member  of  the  first  Lutheran  Church  at  Pottsville. 

On  May  11,  1830,  George  H.  Stichter  was  married  to  Mary,  daughter 
of  John  Hahn,  of  Reading,  Berks  county.  They  were  blessed  with  eleven 
children,  of  whom  four  survive:  Henry  P.  Stichter,  retired  hardware  mer- 
chant; Emma  Fox,  widow  of  Augustus  Fox,  grocer;  Anna  Rich,  widow  of 
Isaac  Rich;  and  Joseph  Stichter,  clerk  with  the  Coal  &  Iron  Company — 
all  of  Pottsville,  Pennsylvania. 

JAMES  LORAH,  of  /East  Union  township,  has  had  his  chief  interests 
in  the  lumber  business  for  a  number  of  years.  At  present  he  deals  exclusively 
in  mine  timber,  operating  as  a  lessee  and  working  the  timber  under  royalty. 
Possessed  of  noteworthy  business  qualities,  Mr.  Lorah  has  made  his  way  in 
the  world  one  of  constant  progress,  in  the  course  of  which  he  has  drawn 
to  himself  the  respect  of  all  his  associates  and  the  good  will  of  his  fellow  men 
generally  by  the  unselfish  spirit  he  has  shown  and  a  keen  sense  of  responsi- 
bility towards  others,  manifest  in  all  his  transactions. 

The  Lorahs  are  an  old  family  of  this  section  of  Schuylkill  county.  Michael 
Lorah,  the  grandfather  of  James  Lorah,  was  bom  May  18,  1788,  in  Berks 
county.  Pa.,  and  was  of  French  descent.  His  education  was  acquired  in  the 
local  subscription  schools.  He  followed  farming  and  shoemaking,  owning 
a  farm  of  one  hundred  acres,  which  included  the  property  where  his  grand- 
son James  Lorah  now  lives,  in  what  is  now  East  Union  township,  Schuylkill 
Vol  II— 2 


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626  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANLA 

county.  It  was  all  Union  then.  He  died  on  his  farm  May  6,  1852,  and  is 
buried  with  his  wife  at  St.. John's  German  Reformed  Church,  of  which  he 
was  a  member.  In  politics  he  was  a  Whig.  It  is  supposed  that  Michael 
Lorah  was  twice  married,  and  the  maiden  name  of  his  first  wife,  bom  Dec. 
23,  1793,  died  March  6,  1837,  was  Hannah  Fry.  His  second  wife's  maiden 
name  was  Polly  Long.  His  children  were:  Emmanuel,  who  married  Mary 
Houser;  Henry,  deceased;  Lafayette,  deceased;  Daniel,  who  married  Polly 
Schappell,  both  now  deceased;  Joshua,  deceased;  John,  who  married  Cath- 
erine Johnson  (she  is  deceased);  Susanna,  who  married  Aaron  Gross; 
Hannah,  wife  of  Samuel  Beaver;  Lucy,  who  died  young,  and  William,  who 
died  young. 

Joshua  Lorah,  son  of  Michael,  was  bom  July  11,  1830,  in  Union  town- 
ship, that  part  now  included  in  East  Union,  and  there  grew  to  manhood, 
meantime  receiving  his  education  in  the  local  district  schools.  During  his 
younger  days  he  worked  for  his  father  on  the  home  place,  and  after  his 
marriage  he  lived  as  a  tenant  on  various  farms,  continuing  thus  for  a  number 
of  years.  When  Michael  Lorah  died  his  son  Emmanuel  bought  the  home- 
stead, which  he  operated  until  his  death,  when  it  was  sold  by  the  adminis- 
trators to  Elias  Peifer,  who  subsequently  sold  sixty-three  acres  of  the  orig- 
inal tract  to  Joshua  Lorah.  He  carried  on  general  farming  there  for  a  con- 
siderable period.  In  his  later  life  he  cut  up  thirteen  acres  of  this  property 
into  building  lots  and  laid  out  the  town  of  Phinny,  including  180  lots.  As  he 
died  before  they  were  all  sold  his  son  James,  as  administrator  of  the  estate, 
continued  to  dispose  of  them,  buying  two  of  them  himself,  upon  which  he 
built  his  present  home.  That  part  of  Joshua  Lorah's  farm  remaining  un- 
divided was  bought  by  his  son  Michael  upon  the  mother's  death,  and  is 
now  owned  by  Jacob  Landauhl. 

Mr.  Lorah  married  Elizabeth  Johnson,  who  was  bom  Sept.  3,  183 1,  in 
Northumberland  county,  Pa.,  daughter  of  Henry  Johnson,  and  was  of  Eng- 
lish ancestry.  Mrs.  Lorah  survived  her  husband,  his  death  occurring  Feb. 
4»  1895,  hers  Feb.  9,  1899,  and  they  are  buried  at  St.  John's  Reformed  and 
Lutheran  Church  in  East  Union  township.  He  was  a  prominent  Reformed 
member  of  that  church,  in  which  he  held  the  highest  offices,  serving  many 
years  as  elder  and  deacon,  and  also  acting  as  treasurer.  Politically  he  was 
a  Republican,  and  kept  up  an  interest  in  local  public  affairs ;  he  served  as  one 
of  the  directors  of  the  school  district  and  as  treasurer  of  same.  To  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Joshua  Lorah  were  bom  the  following  children:  Hannah  married  John 
Deeble,  and  both  are  deceased ;  Michael,  deceased,  married  Sarah  Huntsinger, 
who  now  resides  at  Mountain  Grove,  Luzeme  Co.,  Pa.;  Thomas,  a  resident 
of  East  Union  township,  married  Missouri  Applegate ;  Emma  died  in  infancy ; 
Mary  died  in  infancy;  Albert,  decea^d,  married  Anna  Irwin,  who  Hves  at 
Allentown,  Pa.;  James  is  next  in  the  family;  Sarah,  deceased,  was  the  wife 
of  William  Schaeffer,  who  lives  in  Alabama ;  Rebecca  Elizabeth  is  the  widow 
of  Andrew  B.  Faust,  and  lives  next  door  to  her  brother  James;  Oscar,  of 
McAdoo,  Schuylkill  county,  married  Clara  Applegate ;  Ida  is  married  to  John 
Wilhelm,  of  WiUiamsport,  Pa.;  Jacob  married  Jennie  Davis  of  Brandonville, 
Schuylkill  county,  and  moved  to  Cleveland,  Ohio. 

James  Lorah  was  bom  May  18,  i860,  in  East  Union  township,  Schuyl- 
kill county,  where  he  was  reared  and  educated,  attending  Lorah's  school.  He 
was  trained  to  agricultural  Ufe,  working  on  his  father's  farm  until  twenty-six 
years  old,  after  which  he  was  employed  as  a  section  hand  on  the  Philadelphia 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  627 

&  Reading  road  for  nine  months.  His  next  work  was  for  William  and  Elder 
Spangler,  in  the  lumber  woods  at  Audenried,  Carbon  county,  being  in  their 
employ  about  two  years,  and  later  he  was  a  stationary  engineer  for  Coxe 
Brothers  &  Co.,  at  their  Oneida  (Schuylkill  county)  colliery,  for  a  period  of 
eleven  years.  His  sister,  Mrs.  Andrew  B.  Faust,  having  bought  the  lumber 
business  of  her  deceased  husband  at  the  administrators'  sale,  he  went  into 
partnership  with  her  under  the  name  of  Mrs.  Andrew  Faust  &  Brother,  and 
they  had  joint  interests  for  the  next  nine  years,  when  they  sold  out.  Later 
Mr.  Lorah  formed  another  partnership,  with  his  brother  Michael,  in  the 
same  line,  and  they  were  together  five  years,  dissolving  the  association  by 
mutual  consent.  James  Lorah  is  now  alone  in  the  lumber  business,  con- 
fining his  transactions  entirely  to  mine  timber.  He  has  other  important  con- 
nections also,  being  one  of  the  most  active  business  men  in  his  community, 
and  his  encouragement  of  any  project  is  considered  a  recommendation.  He 
was  one  of  the  first  directors  of  the  Ringtown  National  Bank,  and  is  still 
serving  in  that  capacity. 

Like  the  earlier  generations  of  his  family  in  this  region  Mr.  Lorah  has 
taken  a  deep  interest  in  the  prosperity  of  St.  John's  Reformed  Church,  which 
he  is  serving  as  elder  at  present ;  he  was  formerly  a  deacon.  With  his  brother- 
in-law,  Andrew  B.  Faust,  and  others,  he  built  the  present  house  of  worship, 
Mr.  Faust  furnishing  the  lumber  and  Mr.  Lorah  contributing  liberally  of 
money  and  supervising  the  erection  of  the  building.  He  has  always  taken  a 
leading  part  in  the  enterprises  of  this  church.  Fraternally  he  is  an  Odd 
Fellow,  belonging  to  Ringtown  Lodge,  No.  287,  which  he  joined  Oct.  9,  1890. 
His  political  support  is  given  to  the  Republican  party.  He  has  served  his 
township  six  years  as  school  director,  for  two  years  being  president  of  the 
board. 

Mr.  Lorah  was. united  in  marriage  with  Margaret  Catherine  Faust,  who 
was  bom  May  3,  1863,  in  East  Union  township,  where  she  was  reared  and 
educated,  remaining  at  home  until  her  marriage.  She  is  a  Lutheran  member 
of  St.  John's  Church,  and  formerly  taught  in  the  Sunday  school.  Children 
as  follows  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lorah :  Derwin  Ezra,  born  Dec. 
10,  1891,  received  his  early  education  in  the  township  schools,  and  later  took 
the  college  preparatory  course  at  the  Bloomsburg  (Pa.)  State  Normal  School, 
from  which  he  was  graduated;  he  is  a  member  of  the  Improved  Order  of 
Red  Men  at  Sheppton,  Schuylkill  county,  and  belongs  to  St.  John's  Reformed 
Church.  Ivy  May,  horn  July  12,  1894,  began  her  education  in  the  township 
schools,  later  attending  one  year  at  the  Bloomsburg  Normal  and  taking  one 
summer  course  at  Perkiomen  Seminary,  Pennsburg,  Pa.,  and  is  now  teach- 
ing the  Oneida  school  in  East  Union  township ;  she  is  a  member  of  St.  John's 
Reformed  Church.  OliVe  Margaret,  born  Jan.  5,  1898,  acquired  her  early 
education  in  the  township  schools  and  is  now  attending  the  Keystone  State 
Normal  School  at  Kutztown,  Pa.;  she  is  a  member  of  St.  John's  Reformed 
Church.  Beulah  Caroline,  bom  June  2,  1900,  is  attending  high  school  at 
Sheppton,  in  East  Union  township.  James  Russell,  bom  Dec.  14,  1904,  and 
Heber  Daniel,  bom  Oct.  14,  1907,  are  attending  school  in  the  township. 

Henry  Faust,  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Lorah,  was  bom  April  8,  1780,  prob- 
ably in  East  Brunswick  township,  and  died  June  6,  1871,  aged  ninety-one 
years,  one  month,  twenty-eight  days.  He  is  buried  at  the  Old  White  Church 
near  Ringtown,  and  his  wife,  whose  maiden  name  was  Mengle,  is  buried  at 
Weissport,  Carbon  Co.,  Pa.     It  is  supposed  they  were  farming  people.     Mr. 


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628  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Faust  was  a  Democrat  in  political  sentiment.  His  children  were:  James, 
who  married  Levina  Moyer ;  Frank,  who  married  Dorothy ;  Michael ;  Daniel ; 
Elizabeth  (deceased),  who  married  Jacob  Trout;  and  Catherine,  widow  of 
Henry  Eisenhart,  living  at  Brownsville,  Pennsylvania. 

Daniel  Faust,  father  of  Mrs.  Lorah,  was  bom  near  McKeansburg,  in  East 
Brunswick  township,  Feb.  27,  1828,  and  was  there  reared  and  educated.  Dur- 
ing his  young  manhood  he  worked  out  among  farmers,  and  in  time  bought  a 
farm  of  his  own,  at  Brandonville,  in  East  Union  township,  Schuylkill  county, 
upon  which  he  followed  agricultural  pursuits  the  remainder  of  his  Ufe.  His 
death  occurred  Oct.  11,  1910,  and  he  is  buried  with  his  wife,  Carolina 
(Bitting),  at  the  Old  White  Church  near  Ringtown.  She  was  bom  Oct.  6, 
1835,  daughter  o^  Charles  and  Margaret  (Beaver)  Bitting,  and  died  Aug. 
II,  1914,  at  the  home  of  her  son-in-law,  James  Lorah.  They  had  the  follow- 
ing children :  Hannah  Malinda  married  Jacob  Brobst,  and  they  live  at  Hazle- 
ton,  Pa. ;  Amanda  Elizabeth  is  the  wife  of  Frank  Scott,  of  Brandonville,  this 
county;  Andrew  B.  (deceased)  married  Rebecca  Elizabeth  Lorah;  Margaret 
Catherine  is  the  wife  of  James  Lorah;  Daniel  Wesley  married  Rebecca 
Bolander,  and  they  live  at  Hazleton;  Silas  Mayberry  (deceased)  married 
Charity  Creasy,  and  she  resides  at  Forks,  Columbia  Co.,  Pa.  The  father 
of  this  family  was  a  Democrat  and  a  Lutheran,  belonging  to  St.  John's 
Church  in  East  Union  township,  which  he  served  as  deacon. 

HENRY  L.  MILLER  has  had  his  residence  and  business  headquarters 
at  f^ort  Carbon  for  a  number  of  years.  But  having  had  interests  at  various 
other  points  in  Schuylkill  county,  and  retaining  important  connections  in  sev- 
eral places  besides  his  home  town,  he  has  more  than  local  reputation  and 
standing.  Mr.  Miller  has  exhibited  in  large  degree  the  qualities  which  made 
his  father  one  of  the  most  valuable  citizens  of  this  region  in  his  day,  admired 
for  his  energetic  and  progressive  character  and  respected  for  his  substantial 
contributions  to  the  development  of  the  locality. 

John  Frederick  Miller,  the  father,  was  of  German  nativity,  bom  in  the 
kingdom  of  Wurtemberg.  There  he  spent  his  childhood  and  youth,  coming 
to  this  country  when  twenty-one  years  old.  He  landed  at  Castle  Garden,  New 
York  City,  came  as  far  as  Landingville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  by  canalboat,  and 
thence  walked  to  Orwigsburg,  where  he  found  work  with  Reuben  Hoy  as  a 
farm  hand.  Some  time  later  he  purchased  145  acres  of  land  in  West  Bruns- 
wick township,  lying  one  mile  north  of  Orwigsburg,  the  old  Leymeister 
farm.  Part  of  it  was  still  covered  with  brush  and  timber,  and  he  continued 
the  work  of  clearing  and  cultivation  until  1895,  ^^  which  year  he  removed  to 
the  borough  of  Orwigsburg.  The  property  remained  in  the  Miller  family 
for  forty-five  years,  and  is  now  owned  by  Fred  Blacker.  Jonn  F.  Miller 
acquired  extensive  and  valuable  real  estate  holdings  at  Orwigsburg,  and 
exerted  himself  very  effectively  in  introducing  modem  conditions  of  life  into 
that  town.  The  first  sewers  laid  there  were  of  his  construction,  and  he  was 
the  original  owner  of  the  system,  now  in  the  possession  of  his  son  Henry  L. 
Miller.  When  the  borough  was  ready  to  provide  a  public  water  supply  the 
necessary  land  was  purchased  from  him  for  the  works,  reservoir,  etc.,  and 
he  assisted  the  project  in  every  possible  way.  He  was  one  of  the  original 
parties  interested  in  the  Orwigsburg  Fair  Association,  which  for  years  enter- 
tained the  people  throughout  this  section.  He  was  the  first  to  start  in  the  ice 
business  at  Orwigsburg,  and  carried  it  on  successfully,  as  he  did  everything 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  629 

else  he  undertook.  Indeed,  his  fellow  citizens  had  such  confidence  in  his 
judgment  and  faith  in  his  disinterested  public  spirit,  that  few  men  of  his 
time  were  more  influential  in  guiding  local  affairs,  though  he  took  no  special 
part  in  the  administration  of  public  matters.  However,  he  was  a  zealous  mem- 
ber of  the  German  Lutheran  Church  at  Orwigsburg,  having  been  one  of 
the  founders  of  the  church,  and  he  assisted  in  building  the  present  St.  Paul's 
Church,  which  he  served  as  trustee.  Mr.  Miller  lived  to  the  age  of  seventy- 
eight  years,  dying  in  1909,  after  several  years  of  retirement.  He  is  buried  in 
the  Lutheran  cemetery  at  Orwigsburg. 

Mr.  Miller  married  Sophia  Dietrich,  also  a  native  of  Wurtemberg,  Ger- 
many, who  came  to  America  when  twenty  years  old,  and  died  at  Orwigs- 
burg at  the  age  of  seventy-nine  years.  They  were  married  at  that  place, 
and  the  following  children  were  born  to  their  union:  Elizabeth  died  young; 
Mary  died  young;  William,  who  lives  at  McAdoo,  this  county,  is  engaged  in 
the  ice  business  and  has  a  farm  in  the  Quakake  valley;  Henry  L.  is  next  in 
the  family;  George  B.  is  living  at  Orwigsburg;  John  J.  is  a  resident  of  Shen- 
andoah, this  county;  Catherine  is  the  wife  of  John  Reidler,  of  Orwigsburg; 
Rosie  is  the  wife  of  Charles  H.  Hein,  who  is  serving  as  poor  director  of 
Schuylkill  county;  Frederick  lives  at  Pottsville.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Miller  also 
reared  her  sister's  son,  Jacob  Koenig,  who  was  bom  in  Germany  and  was 
brought  to  America  whep  nine  months  old. 

Henry  L.  Miller  was  bom  May  28,  1862,  at  Orwigsburg,  and  had  school 
privileges  there  and  in  West  Brunswick  township.  His  early  years  were 
spent  in  assisting  his  father  on  the  farm.  At  the  age  of  eighteen  he  went 
to  learn  the  business  of  broommaking,  in  which  eventually  he  became  engaged 
on  his  own  account,  following  it  for  seven  years  at  Orwigsburg  and  Auburn, 
this  county;  he  also  made  brushes.  Then  he  entered  the  hotel  business  at 
Lakeside,  this  county,  also  taking  charge  of  the  pleasure  resort  grounds 
there  for  a  period  of  four  years.  Returning  to  Orwigsburg,  he  became  inter- 
ested in  the  manufacture  of  paper  boxes  in  company  with  Samuel  Miller, 
under  the  firm  name  of  Miller  &  Miller,  carrying  on  the  business  which  they 
sold  to  George  Ketner  and  which  is  now  owned  and  operated  by  Oscar  Knipe. 
For  several  years  following  Henry  L.  Miller  gave  his  time  chiefly  to  the 
timber  business,  and  at  the  same  time  conducted  coal  washeries  along  the 
Schuylkill  river,  near  Schuylkill  Haven,  taking  out  thousands  of  tons  of  coal, 
and  finding  the  venture  very  profitable.  In  1902  he  came  to  Port  Carbon 
and  purchased  the  knitting  plant  then  owned  by  George  Heebner,  and  imme- 
diately set  about  improving  and  enlarging  the  facilities,  foreseeing  the  great 
possibilities  in  the  business.  He  rented  the  old  building  of  the  Evangelical 
Church  at  Port  Carbon,  remodeled  it  to  suit  his  needs,  installed  modem  ma- 
chinery, and  for  the  next  six  years  operated  the  plant  under  the  name  of  the 
Superior  Knitting  Mills.  The  business  was  then  incorporated  as  the  Superior 
Knitting  Company,  with  Mr.  Miller  as  president  and  general  manager,  Messrs. 
S.  R.  Beddall  (ex-sheriflf)  and  G.  W.  Beddall  being  the  other  members  of 
the  firm.  They  continued  together  until  Aug.  i,  1914,  when  Mr.  Miller, 
having  new  ideas  which  he  wished  to  put  into  practice,  resigned  as  president 
and  general  manager  of  the  Superior  Knitting  Company  and  formed  a  part- 
nership with  his  son,  John  J.  Miller,  under  the  name  of  H.  L.  Miller  &  Son. 
They  have  erected  a  fine  modem,  three-story  brick  plant  on  South  Coal  street. 
Port  Carbon,  one  of  the  most  complete  of  its  kind  in  the  State,  equipped 
with  the  most  approved  machinery  known  to  the  trade,  lighted,  heated  and 


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630  .  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

ventilated  in  accordance  with  the  latest  ideas,  admirably  appointed,  in  fact, 
for  the  production  of  the  highest  class  of  work  under  the  most  favorable  con- 
ditions. The  Millers  deserve  no  less  credit  for  the  consideration  they  have 
shown  in  respect  to  the  welfare  of  their  employes  than  for  intelligent  dis- 
crimination in  the  choice  of  machinery  and  the  arrangement  of  their  estab- 
lishment. They  employ  one  hundred  skilled  workers,  who  turn  out  the  finest 
grades  of  underwear,  sold  to  jobbers  all  over  the  world.  Mr.  Miller's  char- 
acteristic thoroughness  has  left  no  weak  points  in  the  business,  his  familiarity 
with  the  details  of  manufacturing  being  well  supplemented  with  executive 
ability  and  grasp  of  trade  conditions.  He  is  one  of  the  owners  in  the  Potts- 
ville  Bleaching  &  Dyeing  Company,  and  for  a  time  was  the  president  of  that 
concern,  but  is  now  vice  president,  Mr.  John  P.  Schwenk,  of  Schuylkill  Haven, 
taking  the  presidency;  John  J.  Miller  (son  of  Henry  L.  Miller)  is  secretary 
and  treasurer.  Mr.  Schwenk  and  Mr.  Miller  erected  the  plant  (at  Potts- 
ville)  in  1909.  It  is  provided  throughout  with  modem  machinery  and  facili- 
ties of  every  description,  being  one  of  the  most  up-to-date  factories  of  the 
kind  in  the  State,  and  the  company  has  established  a  remunerative  business 
in  this  section,  many  factories  having  found  its  conveniences  very  advan- 
tageous. 

Mr.  Miller  is  a  large  property  owner  at  Orwigsburg.  His  holdings  at  one 
time  included  the  **Harlon  House"  there,  and  he  formerly  owned  his  father's 
farm,  but  sold  it  in  1910.  At  one  time  he  owned  another  farm  in  West 
Brunswick  township.  Success  has  come  to  him  as  the  result  of  work,  for 
though  his  ability  is  exceptional  his  application  and  perseverance  have  been 
equally  noteworthy,  and  he  has  maintained  a  name  for  honor  and  int^rity 
in  every  transaction.  While  a  resident  of  Orwigsburg  he  was  an  officer  in 
the  Lutheran  Church.  At  one  time  he  was  an  active  member  of  the  Mahanoy 
City  Gun  Club  and  enthusiastic  in  the  sport,  being  one  of  the  best  wing  and 
rifle  shots  in  this  section. 

In  1885  Mr.  Miller  was  married  at  Orwigsburg,  by  Rev.  H.  I.  Erb,  to  Ida 
Amanda  Honsberger;  daughter  of  Jacob  S.  and  Mary  Matilda  (Walborn) 
Honsberger.  Her  father  now  resides  at  New  Ringgold,  Schuylkill  county. 
She  is  a  great-granddaughter  of  Uris  Walborn,  an  early  settler  at  Pinedale, 
Pa.  The  Honsberger  and  Walborn  families  are  mentioned  elsewhere  in  this 
work.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Miller  have  two  children,  Lottie  Irene  and  John  J., 
both  living  at  home. 

John  J.  Miller  was  bom  Sept.  2,  1889,  at  Lakeside,  this  county,  and 
received  his  education  principally  in  the  local  public  schools,  attending  high 
school  at  Port  Carbon.  In  1909  he  was  graduated  from  the  Peirce  business 
college,  at  Philadelphia.  That  year  he  found  employment  in  the  accounting 
department  of  the  Eastern  Steel  Company's  plant  at  Pottsville,  but  after  a 
short  experience  there  became  associated  with  H.  O.  Roller,  of  Reading,  Pa., 
and  established  the  Pottsville  Motor  Car  Company.  They  did  business  at 
Pottsville,  selling  the  Buick,  Franklin  and  E.  M.  F.  cars.  Two  years 
later  Mr.  Miller  bought  out  his  partner,  and  thereafter  conducted  the  business 
alone  until  he  formed  an  alliance  with  Theodore  K.  Leininger,  of  Orwigs- 
burg, under  the  name  of  the  Pottsville  Automobile  Company.  Their  loca- 
tion was  on  Centre  street,  Pottsville,  and  they  did  a  successful  business,  being 
sole  agents  for  the  Buick  cars  in  Schuylkill  county.  In  October,  1914,  Mr. 
Miller  having  made  arrangements  to  enter  the  manufacturing  business  with 
his  father,  sold  his  interests  in  the  automobile  business  to  Mr.  Leininger,  and 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  631 

he  is  now  devoting  all  his  time  to  his  duties  as  junior  member  of  the  firm  of 
H.  L.  Miller  &  Son  and  secretary  and  treasurer  of  the  Pottsville  Bleaching 
&  Dyeing  Company.  He  is  business-like,  industrious  and  popular,  and  has 
excellent  prospects  of  taking  his  place  among  the  wide-awake  men  of  the 
borough. 

Mr.  Miller  holds  membership  in  the  Patriotic  Order  Sons  of  America, 
the  Independent  Order  ot  Odd  Fellows,  the  Junior  Order  United  American 
Mechanics,  the  T.  P.  A.,  and  the  Pottsville  Motor  Club. 

CHARLES  MEYERS,  proprietor  of  the  Evening  Chronicle,  Pottsville, 
was  bom  in  Branch  township,  near  Minersville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  Nov. 
25,  1855.  He  is  descended  from  German  ancestors,  his  parents,  Jacob  and 
Susanna  (Laudemann)  Meyers,  being  natives  of  Bavaria.  They  immigrated 
to  America  in  1852,  and  were  married  in  Minersville,  spending  the  rest  of 
their  lives  in  Branch  township,  near  Minersville.  The  father  died  in  March, 
1894,  at  the  age  of  sixty-seven,  and  the  mother  died  three  months  later,  at 
the  age  of  seventy-two.  Charles  Meyers  has  been  entirely  ^elf-dependent 
from  early  youth.  His  parents  were  not  financially  able  to  afford  him  the 
advantages  of  an  education,  and  he  left  school  at  the  age  of  ten  years,  to 
join  the  army  of  slate  pickers  at  the  mines.  He  was  employed  in  this  capa- 
city and  that  of  "loader"  until  eighteen  years  of  age.  Thereafter  he  was 
engaged  in  various  lines  of  work  for  a  number  of  years,  until  after  his  mar- 
riage, in  1880,  when  he  returned  to  the  mines  as  a  foreman,  being  thus  em- 
ployed for  several  years,  at  diflferent  places.  In  1894  he  became  the  super- 
intendent of  the  Brookwood  Coal  Company's  washery  at  Mahanoy  Plane, 
both  he  and  his  brother  Harry  having  an  interest  in  the  $50,000  plant  there 
erected.  In  1896  Mr.  Meyers  resigned  this  position  and  was  nominated  as 
Republican  candidate  for  the  office  of  county  commissioner,  a  position  to 
which  he  was  elected  by  a  handsome  majority.  After  this  Mr.  Meyers  again 
returned  to  the  mines,  having  retained  his  interest  in  the  property  previously 
mentioned,  and  soon  thereafter  considerable  change  was  made  in  the  propri- 
etorship, other  property  was  purchased,  and  the  business  of  the  firm  expanded. . 
It  now  became  known  as  the  Madeira,  Hill  &  Co.,  consolidating  with  the  G.  B. 
Newton  &  Company,  and  Mr.  Meyers  owned  a  one-third  interest,  being 
superintendent  of  the  business.  Leases  were  secured  on  additional  property, 
in  diflferent  parts  of  the  county,  the  business  being  devoted  to  mining  and 
washing  culm  banks,  which  proved  profitable.  In  August,  1903,  Mr.  Meyers 
sold  his  interest  in  the  extensive  business  here  briefly  described,  and  in 
May,  1905,  he  purchased  the  Chronicle,  which  is  one  of  the  principal  daily 
papers  in  Pottsville,  as  it  is  also  one  of  the  oldest.  The  Chronicle  from  time 
to  time,  since  Mr.  Meyers  has  acquired  it,  has  been  thei  leader  in  a  ntunber 
of  crusades.  Especially  .was  it  instrumental,  in  the  fall  and  winter  of  1909, 
in  clearing  up  the  stigma  resting  on  Schuylkill  county  jx)litics,  resulting  in 
many  of  the  crooked  ways  of  the  professional  politician  being  made  straight, 
and  the  effect  of  which  is  still  wholesome  on  the  entire  county.  The  plant 
is  large  and  valuable,  fully  equipped  for  all  kinds  of  job  and  book  work,  as 
well  as  the  publication  of  a  daily  newspaper. 

On  Feb.  8,  1880,  Mr.  Meyers  was  married  to  Caroline  Semmet,  of  Cres- 
sona,  Schuylkill  county.  Her  parents,  Frederick  and  Elizabeth  (Leonard) 
Semmet,  were  natives  of  Bavaria,  and  located  at  Cressona  in  an  early  day. 
Her  father  was  killed  in  a  railroad  accident  in  1875,  and  her  mother  died  at 


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632  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Cressona  in  1886.     Mr.  and  Mrs.  Meyers  have  two  daughters,  Marion  and 
Helen,  the  latter  now  the  wife  of  Lester  E.  Schlaseman. 

CHRISTOPHER  LOESER,  ESQ.,  who  at  the  time  of  his  death  was 
the  oldest  member  of  the  bar  of  Schuylkill  county,  was  bom  in  Montgomery 
county.  Pa.,  Nov.  5,  1793,  the  son  of  Christian  and  Elizabeth  (Stringer) 
Loeser.  He  came  to  Schuylkill  county  in  1814.  During  the  war  of  1812  Mr. 
Loeser  served  as  a  lieutenant  in  a  company  from  this  county,  commanded  by 
Capt.  Theophilus  Hughes,  which  in  1814  was  stationed  in  Baltimore.  He 
was  for  some  years  clerk  in  the  prothonotary's  office  under  Dn  McFarland, 
who  was  the  first  prothonotary  under  the  new  county  organization  of  Schuyl- 
kill. Subsequently  Mr.  Loeser  became  deputy  sheriff  under  Benjamin  Christ. 
In  1820,  as  deputy  marshal,  Mr.  Loeser  took  the  first  census  of  the  county, 
going  over  much  of  the  ground  necessarily  on  foot.  He  read  law  under 
James  B.  Hubley,  Esq.;  was  admitted  to  the  bar  of  Schuylkill  county  July 
31,  1820,  and  commenced  the  practice  of  the  law  at  Orwigsburg,  then  the 
county  seat  of  Schuylkill.  He  entered  upon  a  professional  career,  which  con- 
tinued until  he  became  enfeebled  by  disease,  for  nearly  half  a  century.  With 
great  natural  ability  he  united  legal  learning,  untiring  industry,  sterling  integ- 
rity and  fidelity  to  the  interests  of  his  clients,  who  gave  to  him  their  un- 
limited confidence. 

During  his  long  professional  career  Mr.  Loeser  acted  as  legal  adviser  to 
many  of  the  mining  companies.  So  well  known  was  his  sense  of  what  was 
just  and  proper,  that  he  quelled  many  an  incipient  riot  in  the  numerous  strikes 
among  the  coal  miners  of  his  time,  by  merely  raising  his  hand,  and  directing 
the  men  to  return  to  work,  telling  them  that  he  would  personally  present  their 
grievances  to  the  operators,  and  he  never  betrayed  the  confidence.  After 
the  removal  of  the  county  seat  to  Pottsville,  Mr.  Loeser  became  a  resident 
of  that  borough,  where  death,  which  occurred  March  27,  1865,  at  the  age  of 
seventy-two  years,  closed  his  long  and  useful  career.  Mr.  Loeser  was  mar- 
ried to  Louisa  Bartle  Sept.  15,  1833. 

WILLIAM  N.  STINE,  a  prominent  resident  of  Barry  township,  has 
occupied  his  home  place  there  for  over  thirty  years.  He  has  prospered  and 
has  made  investments  from  time  to  time  in  other  farm  lands,  still  retaining 
valuable  interests  of  the  kind.  But  he  has  availed  himself  of  the  opportunities 
to  go  into  other  fields,  has  been  a  successful  trader,  and  at  present  does  con- 
siderable business  handling  real  estate. 

The  Stine  family  is  of  German  extraction.  Jonas  Stine,  father  of  William 
N.,  was  bom  in  the  Mahantongo  valley,  in  this  section  of  Pennsylvania,  where 
his  earlier  ancestors  settled.  He  was  one  of  three  brothers,  and  also  had 
three  half  brothers,  John,  William  and  Safenos,  two  of  whom,  William  and 
Safenos,  were  in  the  military  service  during  the  Mexican  war.  Jonas  Stine 
in  his  youth  followed  carpenter  work,  but  he  soon  became  engaged  in  the 
buying  and  selling  of  horses,  bringing  many  from  the  West.  Later  he  became 
a  merchant,  having  a  store  at  Gettysburg,  whence  he  removed  to  Dark  Comer, 
in  Columbia  county.  His  next  change  was  to  Shamokin,  Northumberland 
county,  and  subsequently  he  was  located  at  Mount  Carmel,  that  county,  from 
which  place  he  moved  to  the  farm  in  Mahantongo  where  the  rest  of  his  life 
was  spent.  He  was  accidentally  killed  in  1869,  by  being  thrown  from  a 
wagon.     Mr.  Stine's  energetic  disposition  made  him  active  in  other  lines  as 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  633 

well  as  in  business,  and  he  was  a  leader  of  public  opinion  among  his  neigh- 
bors, being  regarded  as  an  authority  on  law  and  politics  in  Mount  Carmel. 
He  married  Eva  Ann  Lake,  who  was  bom  near  Reed  station,  in  Northum- 
berland county,  daughter  of  John  Lake,  a  farmer,  who  settled  early  in  North- 
umberland county  and  continued  to  live  there  to  the  end  of  his  days.  Mrs.  > 
Stine  was  one  of  a  large  family,  three  sons  and  several  daughters :  John, 
Daniel,  Milton,  Eva  Ann,  Mahalia,  Kate,  Martha,  and  Maria.  Daniel,  Mil- 
ton, and  several  of  the  daughters  still  survive. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stine  were  bom  three  children:  Louis  lives  at  Ansted, 
W.  Va.;  Dora  died  young;  William  N.  completes  the  family.  He  was  only 
a  small  boy  when  the  mother  died,  in  1855,  and  the  father  remarried,  having 
several  children  by  the  second  union :  John  W. ;  Hannibal  C. ;  Jonas  G. ;  Flora, 
and  Elizabeth.   ^ 

William  N.  Stine  was  bom  in  1851  at  Shamokin,  Northumberland  county, 
received  the  principal  part  of  his  education  in  the  schools  of  Mount  Carmel, 
and  when  yet  a  boy  began  work  at  the  mines.  He  was  first  employed  at  the 
breaker,  and  he  was  afterwards  in  the  mines,  spending  a  year  thus  in  different 
capacities.  When  only  fifteen  years  old  he  became  engaged  in  the  business 
his  father  followed  so  successfully,  dealing  in  horses,  in  which  line  he  later 
developed  an  extensive  trade.  In  1883  he  came  to  his  present  home  property 
in  Barry  township,  Schuylkill  county,  a  farm  of  over  one  hundred  acres,  and 
for  a  number  of  years,  in  connection  with*  its  management,  was  extensively 
engaged  in  buying,  selling  and  exchanging  property.  He  acquired  other 
farm  property,  at  one  time  owning  as  many  as  eight  farms.  Some  of  his 
capital  has  been  attracted  to  other  quarters,  being  at  present  invested  in  the 
coal  fields  of  West  Virginia.  Besides  his  operations  in  real  estate  he  has  an 
interest  in  several  hotela  and  local  bank  stock,  a  practical  proof  of  his  faith 
in  the  stability  of  business  conditions  in  Schuylkill  county.  Though  not  a 
public  man  in  any  sense  he  is  an  influential  member  of  the  community,  where 
his  intelligence  and  substantial  qualities  of  character  are  highly  appreciated. 

In  1871  Mr.  Stine  married  Phietta  Wehry,  a  native  of  the  Mahantongo 
valley,  where  her  father,  David  Wehry,  was  an  early  settler  and  became 
extensively  engaged  in  farming.  Mrs.  Stine's  brothers,  Daniel  and  Amos, 
survive.  Mrs.  Stine  died  May  23,  1901,  the  mother  of  one  child,  Charles 
Henry,  who  lives  in  Barry  township,  this  county.  He  married  Sallie  Berry, 
of  that  township,  and  they  have  had  a  large  family,  eight  still  living. 

FRANK  W.  BAUSUM,  one  of  the  leading  merchants  at  Pottsville,  bears 
a  name  which  has  been  associated  with  the  development  of  Schuylkill  county 
from  its  early  days,  the  family  having  been  established  here  by  his  great- 
grandfather. In  every  generation  the-Bausums  have  been  conspicuous  for 
industry,  honesty  and  the  other  substantial  characteristics  which  are  at  the 
foundation  of  good  citizenship  and  progress  in  any  community.  The  present- 
day  members  of  the  family  are  no  exception. 

Conrad  Bausum,  the  emigrant  ancestor  of  this  family,  came  from  Alsace- 
Lorraine,  near  the  border  line  of  Germany,  settling  in  America  in  young 
manhood.  He  located  near  what  is  now  Orwigsburg,  in  Schuylkill  county, 
Pa.,  and  followed  the  miller's  trade  at  Orwigsburg,  as  well  as  farming.  He 
died  there,  and  is  buried  in  the  old  cemetery  at  that  place.  His  children  were : 
John;  Philip;  William;  and  Sarah,  wh6  went  West  with  a  family  by  the 
name  of  Allairs. 


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634  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Philip  Bausum,  son  of  Conrad,  was  bom  at  Orwigsburg,  Pa.,  and  spent 
most  of  his  life  there,  dying  at  the  comparatively  early  age  of  thirty-five 
years.  He  is  buried  at  Orwigsburg.  By  occupation  he  was  a  carpenter  and 
builder.  He  married  Rebecca  Reinheimer,  daughter  of  Jacob  Reinheimer, 
of  Berks  county,  Pa.,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  the  following  children : 
Mary,  who  died  in  infancy;  Edw.,  deceased;  Henry,  deceased;  Daniel  F.; 
Sarah,  who  died  in  infancy;  and  Emma,  who  married  Charles  Reinhart. 

Daniel  F.  Bausum,  father  of  Frank  W.  Bausum,  was  bom  at  Orwigs- 
burg Feb.  9,  1840,  and  owing  to  his  father's  untimely  death  had  few  advan- 
tages.- When  but  seven  years  old  he  began  to  work  for  Isaac  Orwig,  Sr., 
by  whom  he  was  employed  until  he  reached  the  age  of  fourteen,  and  he  also 
drove  a  store  team  for  Isaac  Orwig,  Jr.  His  next  employer  was  George 
Moser,  for  whom  he  did  farm  work  for  some  time  at  Pine  Creek.  Return- 
ing to  Orwigsburg  he  worked  there  until  the  Civil  war  broke  out,  enlisting 
Aug.  5,  1861,  in  Company  K,  48th  Pennsylvania  Volunteers,  with  which  he 
served  to  the  close  of  the  war,  reenlisting  Jan.  i,  1864,  in  the  same  company. 
He  was  in  the  corps  under  Gen.  Ambrose  E.  Bumside,  and  took  part  in 
thirty-seven  battles,  every  one  in  which  his  regiment  was  engaged  except 
that  at  Newport,  After  the  war  he  returned  to  Pottsville  and  entered  the 
employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Company,  being  engaged  in  railroad 
work  with  that  company  from  Auj§:.  7,  1865,  until  Mardi,  191 1,  when  he  was 
pensioned.  He  is  now  living  retired.  Mr.  Bausum  married  Anna  Wesley, 
daughter  of  Peter  Wesley,  of  Berks  county.  Pa.,  near  Reading.  They  have 
had  five  children:  George,  of  St.  Clair,  this  county,  a  merchant;  Mary,  de- 
ceased; Anna,  who  is  teaching  public  school  at  Pottsville;  Frank  W. ;  and 
Cora  B.,  at  home. 

By  virtue  of  his  service  in  the  Civil  war  Mr.  Bausum  holds  membership 
in,Gowen  Post,  No.  23,  G.  A.  R.,  of  Pottsville,  and  in  the  encampment  of  the 
Union  Veteran  Legion  at  that  place.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  I.  O.  R.  M. 
His  religious  connection  is  with  the  Trinity  Reformed  Church  of  Pottsville. 
Politically  he  is  independent,  casting  his  ballot  for  the  candidates  he  favors 
regardless  of  the  party  which  sponsors  them. 

Frank  W.  Bausum  was  born  Feb.  16,  1872,  at  Pottsville,  and  obtained  his 
education  in  the  public  schools  there.  When  a  boy  of  fifteen  he  began  to  work 
in  Mr.  Rohrheiner's  clothing  store  ill  the  borough,  and  after  clerking  in  the 
same  line  for  a  period  of  fifteen  years  he  formed  his  present  association  with 
George  F.  Moyer,  in  1902,  engaging  in  the  clothing  business  under  the  firm 
name  of  Moyer  &  Bausum,  as  they  still  continue.  Their  first  store  was  at  the 
comer  of  Centre  and  Market  streets,  and  in  1907  they  purchased  the  premises 
at  No,  4  South  Centre  street,  opening  their  new  store  on  that  site  Sept.  25, 
1913.  The  fine  line  of  clothing  carried  by  Moyer  &  Bausum  is  adapted  to 
cater  to  the  most  fastidious  trade,  the  patrons  of  this  firm  knowing  from  long 
experience  that  it  can  be  relied  upon  to  supply  them  with  up-to-date  furnish- 
ings and  correct  clothes  and  having  a  wide  choice  of  desirable  garments  to 
select  from.  Mr.  Bausum  has  evidenced  his  willingness  to  aid  in  keeping  his 
city  well  to  the  front  as  a  progressive  municipality  by  his  hearty  cooperation 
in  the  activities  of  the  Merchants'  Association  (of  Pottsville  and  vicinity), 
of  which  he  was  an  early  member  and  is  now  president.  His  fellow  officers 
are:  E.  F.  Schlaseman,  vice  president;  H.  R.  Knapp,  recording  secretary; 
T.  E.  Hummel,  financial  secretary;  Harry  C.  Manbeck,  treasurer.  Mr. 
Bausum  is  also  a  member  of  the  Civic  Club  of  Pottsville,  taking  a  thorough 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  635 

interest  in  all  that  affects  the  welfare  of  his  native  city.  Hd  belongs  to  the 
Reformed  Church,  and  socially  to  the  local  lodges  of  the  Elks,  Fraternal 
Order  of  Eagles,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  (Camp  No.  36)  and  I.  O.  O.  F.  (Lodge 
No.  20). 

Mr.  Bausum  married  Catherine  R.  Mayberry,  daughter  of  Joseph  S.  May- 
berry,  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  this  county,  and  they  have  two  children,  Ethyle 
M.  and  Harry  W. 

PROF.  GEORGE,  A.  BEHNEY,  principal  of  the  public  schools  of  Out- 
wood,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  was  bom  Aug.  10,  1876,  at  Outwood,  and  is  a 
son  of  Emanuel  and  Catherine  (Reinhart)  Behney. 

Michael  Behney,  the  paternal  grandfather  of  George  A.  Behney,  passed 
his  entire  life  in  Lebanon  county.  Pa.,  where  he  followed  the  trade  of  cooper. 
He  was  the  father  of  the  following  children :  Ephraim,  who  served  as  a  soldier 
in  the  Union  army  during  the  Civil  war,  and  now  resides  at  Lebanon;  Jere- 
miah, who  also  joined  the  Union  army  during  that  struggle,  and  met  his 
death  while  a  prisoner  in  the  notorious  Andersonville  stockade;  Emanuel; 
Louis;  John,  who  is  deceased;  Eliza;  Lucinda,  and  Mary. 

Emanuel  Behney,  father  of  George  A.  Behney,  was  bom  in  Lebanon 
county.  Pa.,  there  received  limited  educational  advantages,  and  grew  up 
amid  the  fumaces  and  forges.  He  became  a  forgeman  and  in  1874  located 
in  Pine  Grove  township,  Schuylkill  county,  securing  a  position  at  the  Eckert 
Forge,  where  he  followed  his  vocation  during  the  remainder  of  his  active  life. 
He  died  at  Outwood  in  1910.  While  he  was  an  industrious  and  skilled 
worker,  Mr.  Behney  was  able  to  accumulate  but  little  property,  but  he  was  one 
of  his  community's  respected  and  substantial  citizens.  He  married  Catherine 
Reinhart,  daughter  of  Ephraim  Reinhart,  who  survives  her  husband  and  lives 
at  Outwood  with  her  son  George  A.  The  following  children  were  in  the 
family :  Emanuel,  Ephraim,  Mary,  Ellen,  John,  Jacob,  Elizabeth  and  George  A. 

The  boyhood  of  George  A.  Behney  was  passed  in  the  little  country  com- 
munity about  six  miles  west  of  Pine  Grove,  and,  as  his  parents  were  poor, 
he  was  allowed  few  advantages  of  an  educational  nature,  early  beginning 
work  at  the  Lincoln  colliery  as  a  slate  picker  in  order  to  contribute  to  the 
family  income.  He  was,  however,  of  a  particularly  studious  and  ambitious 
nature,  and  studied  at  night  when  through  with  his  day's  work,  in  addition 
to  carefully  hoarding  whatever  he  could  save  from  his  meagre  earnings, 
always  with  the  goal  in  view  of  bettering  his  condition.  Through  hard  work 
he  was  able  to  amass  enough  to  pay  his  way  through  the  Keystone  State  Nor- 
mal School,  at  Kutztown,  Pa.,  from  which  he  was  duly  graduated  at  the  age 
of  twenty  years,  and  since  that  time  he  has  been  engaged  principally  in  teach- 
ing school,  although  he  has  also  worked  in  the  mines  in  the  summer  months 
and  engaged  in  other  enterprises.  For  five  years  after  completing  his  normal 
course  Mr.  Behney  taught  school  at  Outwood,  and  then  entered  the  United 
States  railway  mail  service,  with  a  mn  between  Pittsburg  and  New  York 
City.  This  work  did  not  prove  congenial,  however,  and  after  three  months 
he  returned  to  Outwood  and  established  himself  in  business  as  the  proprietor 
of  a  general  store  at  Suedberg.  After  one  year  he  disposed  of  his  interests 
in  that  line  and  accepted  the  position  of  principal  of  schools  at  Outwood,  a 
capacity  in  which  he  has  acted  capably  ever  since.  Mr.  Behney  is  one  of  the 
popular  and  efficient  educators  of  the  county,  earnest,  zealous,  energetic  and 
painstaking,  interested  in  the  advancement  and  careful  in  the  training  of  those 


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636  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

under  his  charge.  He  belongs  to  the  Pennsylvania  State  Educational  Asso- 
ciation and  the  Pennsylvania  State  Teachers'  League.  Fraternally  he  is  affil- 
iated with  Camp  No.  223,  Patriotic  Order  Sons  of  America,  of  Suedberg,  of 
which  he  is  now  secretary,  and  of  which  he  is  an  ex-district  president,  of 
the  Fourth  District  of  Schuylkill  county.  He  also  holds  membership  in  the 
Knights  of  the  Mystic  Chain.  Mr.  Behney  belongs  to  the  Lutheran  Church, 
and  teaches  in  German  a  large  Bible  class  at  Outwood.  That  he  is  independ- 
ent in  thought  atid  action  in  political  affairs,  and  is  standing  boldly  forth  as 
an  exponent  of  better  government,  is  shown  by  a  letter  which  he  sent  to  the 
voters  of  his  district  when  he  became  a  candidate  for  the  Pennsylvania  Legis- 
lature in  191 5,  and  which  said  in  part:  "A  little  over  half  a  century  ago,  on 
the  now  historic  field  of  Gettysburg,  Abraham  Lincoln  delivered  a  short  ad- 
dress which  has  becomd  world-famous,  largely  through  its  decisive  utterance 
of  the  principles  that  really  stand  for  human  liberty  and  free  government.  The 
closing  lines  of  this  address  were :  'Government  of  the  people,  for  the  people, 
by  the  people,  shall  not  perish  from  the  earth.'  To-day  the  words  of  Lincoln 
are  on  the  verge  of  becoming  a  false  prophecy  through  the  abominable  manip- 
ulations and  treacherous  tactics  of  self-seeking  politicians  and  party  machines. 
It  was  for  the  purpose  of  trying  to  rectify  these  evils,  and  to  make  this  coun- 
try once  more  a  government  of,  for,  and  by  the  people,  that  I  conceived  the 
project  of.  placing  myself  among  those  who  are  laboring  toward  this  end.  The 
Washington  Party  as  you  well  know  is  the  only  party  in  the  country  to-day  that 
strives  toward  this  goal;  it  is  to  this  party,  therefore,  that  I  have  given  my 
support  and  my  undying  allegiance.  I  sincerely  hope  that  you  will  stand  by  me 
in  this  fight,  which  means  so  much  for  you  and  for  me  and  for*  the  unborn 
future." 

Mr.  Behney  was  married,  July  24,  191 5,  to  Elizabeth  Ditzler,  daughter  of 
Clinton  Ditzler,  of  Greenpoint,  Lebanon  Co.,  Pa.  Mrs.  Behney's  death, 
occurring  after  less  than  five  months  of  married  life,  Dec.  6,  1915,  was  a 
great  shock  to  the  entire  community. 

JOHN  K.  BERK,  M.  D.,  has  been  established  at  Frackville  ever  since  he 
began  the  practice  of  his  profession,  in  which  he  has  attained  honorable  stand- 
ing by  conscientious  attention  to  his  duties.  He  is,  indeed,  a  most  creditable 
representative  of  a  respected  family  of  Berks  county.  Pa.,  where  it  was 
founded  during  Provincial  days.    The  Berks  are  of  German  lineage. 

The  Berk,  Berck,  or  Berg  family  settled  in  Berks  county  in  the  very  be- 
ginning of  its  history.  The  pioneer  members  of  the  family  were  Henry  and 
Ludwig  Berck,  probably  brothers,  who  located  in  Greenwich  township.  In 
1759  the  former  paid  four  pounds  tax,  and  the  latter  three  pounds.  In  1774 
the  taxable  list  of  Greenwich  township  records  the  names  of  Henry  Berck 
and  Peter  Berck.  It  appears  that  Ludwig  had  already  died  or  removed  from 
that  township.  The  Federal  census  for  1790  records  the  following  Berks  for 
Greenwich  township,  as  heads  of  families :  Peter  Berck,  who  had  a  son  under 
sixteen  years,  a  wife  and  three  daughters;  George  Berck,  who  was  married 
but  had  no  children.  In  i8fii  John  Berk  was  a  taxable  of  Greenwich  town- 
ship, and  paid  a  tax  of  £1  5s.  4d.  The  Berks  were  among  the  Huguenot  fam- 
ilies who  came  to  this  country  for  religious  freedom,  and  with  a  family  bear- 
ing the  name  of  Beli  (now  Bailey)  settled  in  the  same  (Greenwich)  township. 
Both  families  later  moved  to  Albany  township  in  the  same  county.     One 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  637 

branch  of  the  Berk  family  went  to  Ontelaunee,  and  of  that  line  one  member 
went  to  Cumru  township,  where  to-day  Charles  Berg  is  well  known. 

David  Berk,  who  died  in  Greenwich  township  in  1871,  was  survived  by 
his  wife  Hannah  and  sons  David  and  Nathan.  His  will  is'  on  record  in  Book 
12,  page  354. 

Daniel  Bercly  (as  his  name  is  spelled  on  his  tombstone)  was  bom  July 
27,  1796,  and  died  March  6,  1871,  and  is  buried  at  New  Jerusalem  Church  in 
Albany  township.  He  owned  the  farm  now  the  property  of  Charles  Schol- 
lenberger.  This  was  a  large  farm,  and  when  Mr.  Berck  died  it  first  became 
the  property  of  his  son,  Reuben.  His  wife  was  Sarah  Billman,  born  Oct.  12. 
1793,  died  May  28,  1869.  They  had  seven  children,  and  at  their  deaths  twenty- 
nine  grandchildren  and  seven  great-grandchildren.  Among  their  children 
were:  Johan;  Reuben,  born  in  1821,  who  died  when  past  sixty  years  of  age 
(he  married  Lovina  Knepper,  who  died  at  the  a|^e  of  fifty-four  years,  and 
they  lived  in  Albany  township)  ;  Daniel  B.,  bom  m  1825,  died  in  1884,  who 
lived  in  Albany  township ;  and  Salome,  who  married  Jacob  Reinhart. 

Henry  -Berk,  grandfather  of  Dr.  John  K.  Berk,  was  a  prominent  farmer  in 
his  section  of  Berks  county,  where  he  passed  all  his  life.  His  wife's  maiden 
name  was  Greenawalt,  and  they  had  the  following  children :  Floranda,  John 
G.,  Amanda  (Mrs.  Peter  Wamer,  living  at  Kutztown,  Pa.)  and  Llewellyn 
(who  lives  at  MoUtown,  Berks  county). 

John  G.  Berk,  the  Doctor's  father,  was  bom  Jan.  20,  1845,  and  settled 
at  Girardville,  Schuylkill  county,  in  the  year  1873.  After  clerking  about  a 
year  in  a  general  store  there  he  moved  to  Frackville,  where  he  was  in  business 
as  senior  member  of  the  firm  of  John  G.  Berk  &  Co.,  general  merchants, 
remaining  at  the  head  of  that  concem  the  rest  of  his  life.  His  death  occurred 
at  Frackville  April  22,  1880,  when  he  was  but  thirty-five  years  old,  and  he 
was  buried  at  Hamburg.  On  March  30,  1869,  he  married  Mary  Jane  Kal- 
bach,  and  they  had  four  children,  namely:  William  Henry,  bom  Dec.  3, 
1869,  a  clergyman  of  the  Lutheran  Church  now  located  at  Berwick,  Pa.; 
John  K.,  bom  Aug.  22,  1871 ;  Katie  Louisa,  born  June  28,  1874,  who  died 
July  20,  1875 ;  and  Harvey  Isaac,  bom  July  3,  1877,  who  died  June  5,  1878. 
The  mother  remarried,  on  Dec.  30,  1893,  becoming  the  wife  of  William 
Huppert,  of  Frackville.    No  children  were  bom  to  this  union. 

John  K.  Berk  was  bom  Aug.  22,  1871,  at  Hamburg,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  and 
was  reared  in  Schuylkill  county,  beginning  his  education  in  the  public  schools 
at  Frackville.  His  higher  literary  studies  were  pursued  at  the  Keystone 
State  Normal  School  at  Kutztown,  Pa.,  where  he  graduated  in  1892,  after 
which  he  taught  schoolfor  one  year,  at  Lewistown,  Schuylkill  county.  In  the 
fall  of  1893  he  entered  Jefferson  Medical  College,  at  Philadelphia,  and  was 
graduated  in  1896  with  the  degree  of  M.  D.  He  opened  an  office  at  Frack- 
ville, Schuylkill  county,  the  following  October,  and  has  since  devoted  prac- 
tically all  his  time  to  general  practice.  His  skill  and  sincere  efforts  to  keep 
those  who  call  on  him  have  made  him  very  popular  with  a  wide  circle  of 
patrons,  and  in  his  desire  to  serve  them  well  he  has  kept  pace  with  the  advances 
made  in  medical  science  through  various  channels.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Schuylkill  County  Medical  Society;  of  the  Pennsylvania  Medical  State  So- 
ciety; and  the  American  Medical  Association.  Local  business  interests  have 
also  attracted  him  to  some  extent.  He  was  one  of  the;  charter  members  of  the 
First  National  Bank  of  Frackville,  and  was  made  vice  president  of  that  insti- 


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638  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

tution  in  191 1.  In  religious  connection  he  is  a  Lutheran,  and  fraternally  he 
is  a  thirty-second-degree  Mason,  affiliated  with  Ashland  Lodge,  No.  294,  F. 
&  A.  M. ;  Griscom  Chapter,  No.  219,  R.  A.  M. ;  Prince  of  Peace  Commandery, 
No.  39,  K.  T.— all  of  Ashland;  and  Rajah  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.,  of 
Reading. 

On  June  6,  1900,  Dr.  Berk  married  Rae  Ethel  Hand,  daughter  of  Lud- 
man  and  Hester  (Goff)  Hand,  of  Cape  May  Court  House,  N.  J.  They  have 
had  two  sons,  John  William  and  Leslie  Hand. 

The  Kalbach  family,  from  a  hich  Dr.  Berk  is  descended  in  the  maternal 
line,  had  its  origin  in  the  northeastern  part  of  Germany,  whence  came  Chris- 
topher Kahlbach,  the  immigrant  ancestor,  who  settled  in  Heidelberg  town- 
ship, Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  before  the  middle  of  the  eighteenth  century.  Here  he 
acquired  property,  prospered,  and  reared  a  family  of  children,  among  whom 
were  Adam  and  Michael.  The  latter,  bom  in  1766,  died  in  1840.  He  had 
sons:  Daniel,  1800-1874;  and  Michael,  1814-1896  (who  married  Elizabeth 
Womelsdorf,  1816-1895).  Michael,  Sr.,  and  his  sons  are  buried  at  Womels- 
dorf. 

Through  the  marriage  of  George  Kalbach,  one  of  the  early  members  of 
the  family,  to  Maria  Spang,  of  Berks  county.  Pa.,  these  Kalbachs  are  among 
the  heirs  to  the  great  Spang  fortune  in  Germany. 

Adam  Kalbach,  son  of  Christopher,  was  a,  farmer  in  Tulpehocken  town- 
ship, where  he  owned  a  large  plantation,  on  which  he  died,  ripe  in  years,  in 
1801.  He  and  his  wife,  Maria  Eva,  had  these  children:  Michael,  George, 
Adam,  Johannes,  Susanna,  Elizabeth,  Maria  Sabilla,  Regina  Catherine  and 
Sophia. 

Adam  Kalbach,  son  of  Adam,  above,  was  a  farmer  in  Tulpehocken  (now 
Penn)  township,  owning  a  large  tract  of  land.  He  was  twice  married,  his 
first  wife's  maiden  name  being  Catherine  Ruth,  and  his  second  wife's  name 
being  Christ.  His  children,  all  by  the  first  union,  were:  Adam;  Joseph; 
John ;  William ;  Isaac ;  Elizabeth,  Mrs.  Conrad  Loose ;  Catherine,  Mrs.  Loose ; 
Liddie,  Mrs.  John  Epler ;  and  Jacob. 

Isaac  Kalbach,  son  of  Adam  and  Catherine  (Rjith)  Kalbach,  was  bom 
July  3>  1820,  near  Bemville,  in  Bern  township,  Berks  county.  He  attended 
school  in  the  locality,  and  until  forty  years  old  remained  on  the  home  farm 
in  that  township  with  his  brother  William.  Meantime,  on  Feb.  2,  1845,  he  mar- 
ried L.  Haus,  the  ceremony  being  performed  by  Rev.  August  Hermann.  She 
was  bom  May  i,  1826,  in  Bern  township,  daughter  of  Benjamin  and  Elisabetha 
Haus,  and  died  at  Frackville.  Mr.  Kalbach  died  there  March  10,  1877,  aged 
fifty-six  years,  eight  months,  seven  days.  He  was  a  member  of  the  German 
Reformed  Church  always  known  as  the  Bern  Church.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Kal- 
bach had  children  as  follows:  Elisabetha,  bom  Nov.  i,  1845,  who  died  when 
eighteen  years  old;  William  Adam,  bom  June  11,  1847;  Mary  Jane,  bom 
Aug.  13,  1848;  James  Benjamin,  born  Jan.  31,  1853,  who  died  when  nine  years 
old;  Emma  Catherine,  bom  Sept.  10,  1854,  deceased  in  infancy;  Henry  Wash- 
ington, bom  Oct.  10,  1856,  who  died  when  five  years  old;  Martha  M.,  born 
March  28,  i860,  who  died  when  three  years  old;  and  Catherine  Ellen,  bom 
Sept.  20,  1862,  who  married  Isaiah  Mensch. 

ABRAHAM  CARL,  deceased,  was  bom  in  Schuylkill  county.  Pa.,  a  son 
of  Philip  Carl,  also  a  resident  of  this  county,  whose  useful  life  was  rounded 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  639 

out  within  its  confines.  The  children  of  Philip  Carl  wgre:  Elizabeth,  John, 
Daniel,  Abraham,  David  and  Samuel. 

While  still  a  boy  Abraham  Carl  learned  the  shoemaker's  trade,  and  he 
followed  it  for  a  few  years,  but  later  became  a  butcher,  learning  that  calling 
at  Feamot,  where  he  resided  for  a  period.  In  1874  he  located  at  Tower  City, 
and  until  1881  was  actively  engaged  in  butchering.  Then  for  a  year  he 
operated  a  farm  in  Porter  township,  and  returnin|^  to  Tower  City  embarked 
in  a  general  merchandising  business,  which  he  contmued  for  seven  years.  He 
built  the  well  known  "Carl  House"  at  Tower  City,  and  operated  this  hotel 
until  within  a  year  of  his  death,  which  occurred  Jan.  30,  1898.  His  remains 
were  interred  at  the  Artz  Church,  near  Sacramento,  in  Hubley  township, 
Schuylkill  county.  For  many  years  he  was  one  of  the  well  known  men  of  this 
section,  and  his  success  in  business  through  honorable  methods  proved  an 
incentive  to  others  to  pursue  a  like  course.  He  was  one  of  the  members  of  the 
Patriotic  Order  Sons  of  America. 

Mr.  Carl  married  (first)  Catherine  Schwalm,  who  died  leaving  one  son, 
Fred  M.,  who  is  now  a  butcher  in  Tower  City.  The  second  wife  of  Mr.  Carl 
bore  the  maiden  name  of  Ellen  M.  Shade,  and  she  was  a  daughter  of  Jacob 
and  Mary  (Klinger)  Shade.  There  were  no  children  of  this  marriage,  but 
Mrs.  Carl  has  reared  four  belonging  to  others,  one  of  whom,  Harry  C.  Kurtz, 
a  son  of  Reuben  Kurtz,  has  been  with  heir  since  he  was  two  years  old.  He 
is  a  plumber  and  tinsmith  by  trade,  and  is  employed  by  Ira  W.  Hand  at  Reiner- 
ton,  Pa.  Mrs.  Carl  still  owns  the  "Carl  House."  Like  the  rest  of  the  fam- 
ily she  is  a  Lutheran,  and  her  charities  in  conjunction  with  her  church,  in  addi- 
tion to  those  of  a  private  nature,  are  many.  She  is  beloved  by  all  who  know 
her,  and  those  whom  she  has  reared  as  her  own  rise  up  to  call  her  blessed. 

WALTER  G.  BOWERS,  M.  D.,  Medical  Superintendent  at  the  Schuyl- 
kill County  Hospital  for  the  Insane,  located  within  two  miles  from  the  borough 
of  Schuylkill  Haven,  is  a  physician  of  wide  hospital  experience,  particularly 
in  the  line  in  which  he  is  now  serving.  His  early  training  was  thorough  and 
comprehensive,  a  solid  foundation  for  the  practical  work  which  he  has  had 
in  such  great  variety  in  his  special  field,  and  his  adn^inistration  has  been  highly 
satisfactory  to  the  citizens  of  Schuylkill  county. 

Dr.  Bowers  was  bom  Sept.  23,  1879,  at  Parsons,  Luzerne  Co.,  Pa.,  and 
obtained  his  early  literary  education  m  the  public  schools  of  that  vicinity, 
graduating  from  the  high  school  at  Wilkes-Barre.  He  then  entered  the 
Medico-Chirurgical  College,  at  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  where  he  took  the  full  course, 
graduating  in  the  year  1904.  Immediately  following  his  graduation  he  became 
an  Interne  at  the  State  Hospital  of  the  North  Eastern  Anthracite  Coal  Region, 
at  Scranton,  Pa.,  where  he  remained  for  one  year.  Then  for  eighteen  months 
he  was  at  the  Philadelphia  General  Hospital  (Blockley),  Philadelphia,  mean- 
time passing  the  civil  service  examination  at  that  city  and  at  the  close  of  his 
service  in  the  institution  named  becoming  first  assistant  at  the  Philadelphia 
Hospital  for  the  Insane,  at  Philadelphia.  The  next  three  years  were  spent 
there,  until  he  transferred  to  the  State  Hospital  for  the  Insane  at  Norristown, 
Pa.  He  continued  in  successful  work  in  that  connection  until  appointed  to  his 
present  position,  at  the  Schuylkill  County  Hospital  for  the  Insane,  July  17, 
191 2.  He  was  its  first  superintendent,  assuming  his  duties  when  the  hospital 
was  opened,  so  that  the  entire  credit  for  the  progressive  spirit  which  has  been 
manifested  at  this  institution  from  the  beginning  belongs  to  him.     This  is 


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640  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

verified  by  the  report  of  Floyd  Haviland,  M.  D.,  of  Kings  Park,  N.  Y.,  who 
in  his  report  to  The  Public  Charities'  Association  of  Pennsylvania,  after  a 
survey  of  all  the  Institutions  in  Pennsylvania  caring  for  the  insane,  said: 
"This,  in  most  respects,  is  the  best  County  Hospital  in  the  State."  Dr.  Haviland 
spent  six  months  at  this  work.  Dr.  Bowers'  conscientious  performance  of 
every  obligation,  and  many  responsibilities  voluntarily  taken  upon  himself, 
show  how  deep  is  his  interest  in  improving  the  condition  of  those  in  his  care, 
and  how  earnest  he  is  in  his  endeavor  to  be  of  real  service  to  the  community 
which  has  honored  him  with  so  important  a  trust.  He  has  been  well  received 
among  his  professional  co-workers  in  the  county,  being  a  member  of  the 
Southern  Schuylkill  County  Medical  Society,  the  Schuylkill  County  Medical 
Society,  the  Pennsylvania  State  Medical  Society,  and  the  American  Medical 
Association.  Fraternally  he  is  a  Mason,  affiliated  with  Page  Lodge,  No.  270, 
F.  &.A.  M.,  of  Schuylkill  Haven. 

Dr.  Bowers  was  married  to  Rae  R.  Pierce,  of  Millville,  N.  J.,  and  they 
have  two  children,  Leroy  and  Ruth. 

CHARLES  HERBERT  MARSHALL,  cashier  of  the  Merchants'  National 
Bank,  Pottsville,  Pa.,  is  undoubtedly  a  self-made  man,  and  his  career  is  an 
example  of  what  c^n  be  accomplished  even  in  these  modem'  days  by  energy, 
hard  work  and  perseverance.  Young  men  who  complain  of  lack  of  opportu- 
nities for  advancement  should  read  and  learn  what  has  been  done  by  one  man 
who  started  in  life  without  a  dollar  and  won  a  position  where  he  handles 
thousands  of  those  valuable  tokens  of  wealth. 

James  Henry  Marshall,  father  of  Charles  H.  Marshall,  was  bom  in 
England  April  20,  1820,  and  came  to  America  when  a  youth.  He  first  resided 
in  Philadelphia,  being  a  member  of  the  old  Marshall  family  of  that  city,  but 
remained  there  only  a  short  time,  coming  to  Jefferson  county,  Pa.,  where  he 
bought  a  plat  of  165  acres  at  Sugar  Hill,  near  Brockwayville.  He  settled 
down  to  agriculture  for  the  rest  of  his  days,  tos  wife,  Ellen  (Robinson),  a 
native  of  England,  died  in  Jefferson  county  Jan.  21,  1880,  and  is  buried  at 
Sugar  Hill.  Mr.  Marshall  died  Au^.  5,  1874,  and  is  also  buried  at  Sugar  Hill. 
Six  children  were  bom  to  their  union :  Martha  Jane  Marshall,  who  married 
William  W.  Dougherty;  Emma  Marshall,  wife  of  John  Bryan;  Florence 
Marshall,  wife  of  William  F.  Burchfield;  John  E.  Marshall,  who  resides  on 
the  homestead  in  Jefferson  county;  James  H.  Marshall,  also  residing  on  one 
of  the  homesteads  in  Jefferson  county ;  and  Charles  H.  Marshall. 

Charles  Herbert  Marshall  was  bom  July  27,  1866,  on  the  old  farm  at 
Sugar  Hill,  Jefferson  Co.,  Pa.  He  was  orphaned  at  the  age  of  thirteen  and 
had  but  twenty-five  cents  when  he  started  out  to  get  an  education  and  support 
himself  during  the  endeavor.  But  he  had  unlimited  courage,  and  undaunted 
by  adversity  took  every  odd  job  given  him  by  the  sympathetic  but  hardworking 
neighbors.  In  the  summer  he  worked  from  daylight  to  dark  at  the  numerous 
tasks  of  the  farm,  and  in  the  winter  did  chores  morning  and  evening  to  pay 
for  his  board,  so  as  to  attend  the  local  public  schools,  from  which  he  was  grad- 
uated in  1883.  As  he  grew  older  he  labored  in  the  lumber  camps  during  sev- 
eral winters,  in  order  to  get  money  enough  to  continue  his  education.  Finally 
he  accumulated  the  amount  necessary  to  pay  for  a  course  at  the  Clarion 
Normal  School,  Clarion,  Pa.,  and  later  one  in  the  Iron  City  Business  Collie, 
at  Pittsburgh,  and  defray  his  expenses  while  in  attendance.  Having  com- 
pleted the  course  and  graduated,  April  14,  1887,  he  immediately  found  a  posi- 


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rUBLiC  Lii::  .i::Y 

ASTOR,   LEy^> 
TTLDl-N   hi  {.::l.s  .  - 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  641 

tion  as  bookkeeper  with  Horton  Brothers,  of  Brockport,  Pa.,  with  whom  he 
remained  for  one  year.  He  next  returned  to  Brockwayville  and  took  charge 
of  the  books  in  Bond  &  Cooper's  hardware  store,  remaining  with  them  until 
May,  1892,  whn  he  was  offered  the  position  of  bookkeeper  in  the  Brockway- 
ville Bank.  He  held  this  position  until  October,  1895,  when,  though  but 
twenty-nine  years  old,  he  was  elected  cashier.  In  1900  he  formed  a  partner- 
ship with  R.  L.  Buzzard  and  W.  G.  McCain  and  bought  up  all  the  shares  of 
the  bank. 

In  July,  1900,  Mr.  Marshall  promoted  the  First  National  Bank  of  Brock- 
wajrvrille,  was  one  of  the  largest  stockholders,  and  took  the  responsible  position 
of  cashier  and  director.  His  activities  seemed  to  be  but  commenced,  for  in 
the  year  1904  he  assisted  in  the  organization  of  the  DuBois  National  Bank, 
of  which  he  became  assistant  cashier.  In  1907  he  saw  the  opportunity  and 
again  assisted  in  the  formation  of  a  bank,  this  time  at  Potts ville.  With  a 
capital  of  $125,000  and  a  surplus  of  $25,000,  the  new  bank  was  firmly  estab- 
lished, Mr.  Marshall  taking  the  position  of  cashier  (and  also  director),  which 
he  holds  at  the  present  time.  The  Merchants*  National  Bank  is  one  of  the 
most  substantial  in  the  State,  and  to  the  financial  acumen  and  clear  discern- 
ment of  Charles  H.  Marshall  a  great  part  of  its  prosperity  is  due.  Concerning 
the  many  industrial  enterprises  in  which  he  is  interested,  it  is  unnecessary  to  go 
into  detail.  Suffice  it  to  say  he  is  always  prepared  to  finance  any  industry  of 
benefit  to  the  community  and  takes  a  warm  pe^onal  interest  in  building  up  his 
adopted  town,  industrially  and  socially. 

On  March  24,  1891,  Mr.  Marshall  was  married  to  Elizabeth  Biddle,  dau|^h- 
ter  of  Nelson  Biddle,  of  Mifflinburg,  Union  Co.,  Pa.,  and  they  have  one  child, 
Anna  Marshall.  Politically  Mr.  Marshall  is  a  Republican.  He  held  several 
borough  offices  while  in  Brockwayville,  being  the  youngest  burgess  ever  elected 
in  that  borough.  He  is  a  member  of  the  First  Presbyterian  Church  of  Potts- 
ville,  of  the  Pottsville  Qub,  and  of  the  Acorn  Club  of  EHiBois.  He  was  for- 
merly a  member  of  Knapp  Commandery,  No.  40,  Knights  Templar,  of  Ridg- 
way,  but  transferred  his  membership  from  that  Commandery  to  Bethany 
Commandery,  No.  83,  of  DuBois,  of  which  he  was  a  charter  member.  He 
still  belongs  to  Elk  Chapter,  No.  230,  and  Elk  Lodge,  No.  379,  F.  &  A.  M., 
both  of  Ridgway,  Pa.,  and  also  holds  membership  in  ZemZem  Temple,  A.  A. 
O.  N.  M.  S.,  of  Erie. 

WILLIAM  HORN,  of  Sheppton,  has  held  an  honored  place  in  that  town 
and  the  adjacent  part  of  Schuylkill  county  for  many  years,  his  business  and 
official  duties  bringing  him  into  contact  with  a  large  proportion  of  his  fellow 
citizens.  He  was  bom  March  10,  1840,  at  Pine  Grove,  Schuylkill  county,  and 
the  family  has  been  here  since  his  grandfather's  time.  So  far  as  is  known,  his 
great-grandfather  came  from  the  North  of  Ireland. 

William  Horn,  the  grandfather,  was  bom  in  the  State  of  New  Jersey,  was 
a  shoemaker  by  trade,  and  died  in  1847,  at  the  age  of  sixty-five  years.  Com- 
ing to  Pennsylvania,  he  settled  near  Reading,  in  Berks  county,  was  married 
in  that  county,  and  thence  removed  to  Pine  Grove  township,  Schuylkill  county, 
where  he  became  a  well  known  citizen,  serving  that  township  as  a  justice  df 
the  peace  for  a  number  of  years.  He  was  located  near  the  Lauberry  mines, 
and  followed  shoemaking  all  his  life.  His  wife,  Elizabeth  (Bretz)^  died  when 
about  sixty-five  years  old.  Their  children  were :  Daniel ;  Mary ;  Abraham ; 
Joseph :  John ;  William ;  Sarah,  Mrs.  Fisher,  a  widow,  now  residing  with  her 

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642  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

daughter  at  No.  2  Patch,  in  Bear  Valley,  near  Shamokin,  Northumberland 
Co.,  Pa.;  Jerusha,  who  married  John  Elder  (he  is  deceased) ;  and  Eliza.    At 
this  writing  (1915)   Mrs.  Sarah  Fisher  is  the  only  survivor  of  the  family.  • 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Horn  are  buried  in  Pine  Grove  township,  this  county. 
He  was  a  Democrat  in  political  opinion. 

Daniel  Horn,  son  of  William  and  Elizabeth  (Bretz)  Horn,  was  bom 
March  16,  181 5,  near  Reading,  and  lived  to  the  age  of  ninety-three  years, 
eleven  months,  twenty-three  days,  passing  away  March  7,  1909.  The  neigh- 
borhood at  that  time  offered  no  educational  advantages,  and  he  began  work 
early.  He  lived  in  Berks  county  until  twenty-one  years  of  age,  and  was  there 
employed  in  chopping  wood  for  the  charcoal  furnaces.  Coming  to  Pine  Grove 
township,  Schuylkill  county,  he  found  work  as  a  miner  at  the  Lauberry  mines 
for  a  short  time,  later  buying  a  team  and  hauling  coal  on  the  Mine  Hill  road, 
from  Llewellyn  to  the  canal  dock  at  Schuylkill  Haven.  This  was  before  the 
locomotive  came  into  use  on  that  road.  He  entered  into  a  contract  with  the 
Hibners  Coal  Company  to  furnish  minctimber,  and  was  so  occupied  two  years, 
then  removing  to  Tamaqua,  this  county,  where  he  worked  a  little  while  on  the 
Little  Schuylkill  railroad.  Later  he  took  a  contract  to  furnish  cordwood  for 
their  wood-burning  locomotives  which  he  kept  for  five  years,  in  1863  moving 
to  Mahanoy  City,  where  he  obtained  the  position  of  chute  boss  at  the  Hill  & 
Harris  colliery,  remaining  there  for  the  next  seventeen  years.  At  the  end  of 
that  period  he  retired  and  for  a  time  lived  at  Shenandoah,  moved  thence  to 
East  Union  township,  and  a  short  time  before  his  death  took  up  his  resi- 
dence with  his  daughter  Laura,  Mrs.  Charles  Schreaves,  in  Shenandoah,  at 
whose  home  he  died.  Mr.  Horn  married  Susanna  Feger,  who  was  born  Dec. 
27,  1813,  near  Reading,  Pa.,  and  survived  him  a  few  months,  dying  June  17, 
1909.  They  are  buried  in  the  Evangelical  Church  cemetery  near  Ringtown. 
He  was  a  member  of  that  denomination.  In  politics  Mr.  Horn  was  originally 
a  Democrat,  but  after  his  son  William  returned  from  his  service  with  the 
Union  army  he  turned  Republican.  A  large  family  was  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Daniel  Horn :  Sarah  E.  (deceased),  was  the  wife  of  David  Faust,  of  Camden, 
N.  J.,  a  fire  insurance  broker;  William  is  mentioned  below;  Henry,  Clara  and 
Franklin  died  young;  Daniel  A.  was  accidentally  killed  at  Atlanta,  Ga.,  in  1887 
(he  married  Mary  Brannigan,  and  left  four  children)  ;  Maria  married  Daniel 
D.  Kirby,  publisher  of  the  Salem  Herald,  of  Salem,  Ohio,  and  they  have  two 
children;  Matilda  married  Alton  O.  Crobaugh,  and  they  have  one  child  (he 
is  watchman  at  the  Knickerbocker  colliery,  Shenandoah)  ;  Joseph  died  young; 
Laura  married  Charles  Schreaves,  of  Shenandoah,  a  watchman. 

Jacob  Feger,  father  of  Mrs.  Susanna  (Feger)  Horn,  was  a  native  of  Berks 
county,  Pa.,  where  he  lived  until  after  his  marriage.  He  owned  and  operated 
a  paper  mill  there,  and  moved  thence  to  Schuylkill  Haven,  Schuylkill  county. 
During  one  governor's  term  he  was  doorkeeper  of  the  House  of  Representa- 
tives at  Harrisburg.  This  was  during  the  middle  fifties.  Later  he  was  elected 
prothonotary  of  Schuylkill  county,  in  which  office  he  served  one  term.  Polit- 
ically he  was  a  Democrat,  in  religion  a  member  of  the  Evangelical  Church. 
He  and  his  wife,  Elizabeth  (Yergy),  both  died  at  the  age  of  seventy-four 
years,  and  they  are  buried  at  Spring  Garden,  Schuylkill  Haven.  They  had 
children  as  follows:  William;  Joseph,  who  married  a  Miss  Mills;  Franklin, 
who  married  Sarah  Johnson;  Susanna,  who  married  Daniel  Horn;  Matilda, 
who  married  Cornelius  Hoffman;  Priscilla,  who  married  George  K.  Reed; 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  643 

Eliza,    who    married    Morgan    Saylor;    Amanda,    who    married    Emmanuel 
Pflueger;  and  Abigail,  who  married  William  Spangler. 

William  Horn  was  reared  at  Tamaqua  and  Llewellyn,  where  he  attended 
public  school  until  he  reached  the  age  of  twelve  years.  He  has  made  his  own 
way  in  the  world  since.  His  first  employment  was  as  water  boy  for  a  gang 
of  trackmen  building  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  road,  the  part  then  known 
as  the  Little  Schuylkill.  As  he  became  able  to  assume  more  responsibility  he 
was  given  work  as  a  trackman,  working  as  such  until  he  reached  his  twenty- 
first  year.  At  that  time  came  the  first  call  for  volunteers  to  defend  the  Union, 
and  Mr.  Horn  was  a  member  of  the  local  organization  known  as  the  Scott 
Rifles,  formed  at  Tamaqua,  and  mustered  into  the  United  States  service  as 
Company  C,  loth  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Infantry.  Their  service  was  for 
ninety  days,  at  the  end  of  which  term  he  reenlisted,  joining  Company  H,  96th 
Pennsylvania  Infantry,  after  a  three  weeks'  furlough.  The  company  was  first 
under  the  command  of  Capt.  Henry  Hippie,  and  after  his  resignation  under 
Henry  Royer.  The  regiment  left  Pottsville  Nov.  8,  1861,  proceeded  by  way 
of  Gordon  Plane  and  Shamokin  to  Washington,  D,  C,  and  thence  into  camp 
at  Bladensburg,  Md.  It  was  then  moved  across  the  Long  bridge  into  Vir- 
ginia, beyond  Fairfax  Seminary.  Col.  Henry  L.  Cake,  commanding  the  regi- 
ment, named  the  new  location  Camp  Northumberland,  in  honor  of  his  home 
county.  Up  to  this  time  the  command  had  been  engaged  principally  in  picket 
duty.  Shortly  afterwards  the  regiment  was  sent  by  boat  to  Fortress  Monroe, 
and  after  the  evacuation  of  Yorktown  went  up  the  York  river  to  West  Point, 
where  it  had  a  slight  skirmish  with  the  Confederate  rear  guard.  From 
West  Point  it  went  on  to  White  House  Landing,  thence  to  Mechanicsville, 
where  it  was  in  camp  for  a  short  time,  moving  across  the  Chickahominy  river 
to  Savage  Station.  It  participated  with  McQellan  in  the  Peninsular  cam- 
paign. On  June  27,  1862,  it  formed  the  extreme  right  of  the  Federal  line  at 
Gaines'  Mill,  and  the  following  day  supported  the  batteries  at  White  Oak 
Swamp.  At  Malvern  Hill  it  again  had  the  extreme  right  of  the  line,  and 
with  the  rest  of  the  army  fell  back  when  that  engagement  was  over.  After 
participating  in  the  second  battle  of  Bull  Run  the  6th  Corps,  to  which  the 
96th  had  been  assigned,  was  moved  to  help  intercept  the  Confederate  move- 
ment into  Maryland.  On  Sept.  14th  was  fought  the  battle  of  South  Mountain. 
Mr.  Horn's  company  took  part  in  the  gallant  charge  up  the  slope,  with  the 
final  result  of  a  decisive  Federal  victory,  going  into  the  charge  with  forty- 
eight  men,  of  which  twenty-four  were  killed  or  wounded.  He  received  a 
gunshot  wound  in  the  breast,  so  severe  that  the  army  surgeons  did  not  expect 
him  to  live,  and  he  spent  three  months  in  hospital  at  Burketsville  and  Fred- 
erick, Md.  When  discharged  from  the  hospital  he  was  so  weakened  by  his 
injuries  as  to  be  incapacitated  for  further  service,  and  he  returned  to  Tamaqua. 
For  a  time  Mr.  Horn  tried  railroad  work,  but  found  he  was  in  no  con- 
dition to  stand  it.  Then  he  went  to  Mahanoy  City  and  took  a  position  at 
hoisting,  on  a  coal  plane,  remaining  there  seven  years.  In  1871  he  went  out 
to  Missouri,  where  he  expected  to  do  farm  work,  but  it  was  too  much  for  his 
strength,  and  after  fourteen  months  in  that  section  he  returned  to  Mahanoy 
City,  where  he  found  employment  issuing  supplies  to  miners,  shipping  coal,  at 
the  Mahanoy  City  colliery.  The  superintendent  of  this  colliery  later  asked 
him  to  take  the  position  of  foreman  at  the  Elmwood  colliery,  Mahanoy  City, 
where  he  continued  for  five  years,  being  afterwards  sent  to  the  Indian  Ridge 
colliery,  where  he  was  outside  foreman  for  five  years.     Meantime  he  had 


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644  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

bought  a  farm  of  103  acres  in  East  Union  township,  and  his  father-in-law, 
Aaron  Van  Horn,  operated  the  place  for  five  years,  Mr.  Horn  having  stocked 
it  after  it  came  into  his  possession.  When  he  resigned  his  position  at  the 
Indian  Ridge  colliery  he  moved  to  the  farm,  and  lived  there  for  three  years, 
though  he  had  nothing  to  do  with  its  cultivation.  He  still  owns  eighty-five 
acres  of  the  place  (having  given  the  rest  to  his  daughter),  and  has  fifty  acres 
of  his  property  cleared,  the  farm  being  now  rented  and  operated  by  John 
Kahley. 

Mr.  Horn  has  been  quite  closely  connected  with  the  administration  of 
local  affairs.  In  1887  he  was  elected  justice  of  the  peace,  for  East  Union 
township,  and  accordingly  opened  an  office  at  Sheppton,  to  which  town  he 
subsequently  removed.  By  repeated  reelections  he  continued  to  fill  the  office 
for  a  quarter  of  a  century,  closing  his  duties  in  January,  1913.  He  is  still 
acting  as  a  notary  public,  deputy  coroner  (which  office  he  has  held  twelve 
years)  and  register  of  births  and  deatl)s,  and  has  also  been  school  director, 
supervisor  and  judge  of  election.  In  politics  he  has  always  been  associated 
with  the  Republican  party.  For  a  number  of  years  he  has  carried  on  business 
as  an  insurance  broker  and  real  estate  dealer,  collects  rents,  and  is  agent  for 
the  local  sewer. 

Mr.  Horn  has  always  kept  in  touch  with  social  and  church  enterprises.  He 
is  a  member  of  Watkin  Waters  Post,  No.  146,  G.  A.  R.,  of  Shenandoah,  and 
has  been  guard  of  that  post;  formerly  he  held  membership  in  General  Grant 
Lodge,  No.  575,  I.  O.  O.  P.,  of  Mahanoy  City.  He  is  a  zealous  member  of 
the  Evangelical  denomination,  now  connected  with  the  church  at  Shenandoah, 
and  has  served  as  exhorter  and  class  leader  at  both  Shenandoah  and  Mahanoy 
City. 

In  1863  Mr.  Horn  was  married,  at  Tamaqua,  to  Rebecca  Margaret  Van 
Horn,  who  was  bom  March  8,  1842,  in  Salem  township,  Luzerne  Co.,  Pa., 
and  shortly  afterwards  they  moved  to  Mahanoy  City.  They  have  had  four 
children:  Ella,  bom  June  14,  1864,  died  Jan.  30,  1910;  she  was  the  wife  of 
H.  F.  Faust,  of  Camden,  N.  J.,  an  employe  of  the  Victor  Talking  Machine 
Company,  and  the  mother  of  one  child,  Roy  Brenton,  born  in  1892,  who  mar- 
ried Sallie  Kunkel  and  has  one  child,  Elrl ;  they  live  at  Camden.  William  F., 
bom  April  14,  1868,  is  outside  foreman  at  the  Oneida  colliery  in  East  Union 
township,  Schuylkill  county;  he  married  Sarah  Alvaretta  Rich,  who  died 
Jan.  31,  1908,  the  mother  of  these  children:  Duane,  Auber,  Retta,  Grace, 
Bessie,  Florence,  and  one  that  died  unnamed.  Bessie  Van  Hom,  bom  July 
25,  1873,  is  the  wife  of  Benjamin  F.  Van  Horn,  a  carpenter  in  East  Union 
township;  they  have  had  children,  Guy  (deceased),  Sylvester  (deceased), 
Leslie,  Margaret  and  Althea.  Rev.  Leo  D.,  bom  Jan.  i,  1882,  is  a  Reformed 
clergyman  now  stationed  at  McConnellstown,  Huntingdon  Co.,  Pa.;  he  mar- 
ried Pearl  Kahley,  and  their  children  are  Vemon  M.,  Daisy  May  and  Merl. 

Mrs.  Rebecca  Margaret  (Van  Hom)  Hom  was  educated  at  Tamaqua,  to 
which  place  her  parents  removed  in  1846.  She  is  a  member  of  the  Evangelical 
Church,  her  last  association  being  with  the  organization  at  Shenandoah,  where 
she  still  retains'  membership.  Mrs.  Hom  is  a  daughter  of  Aaron  Van  Hom 
and  a  granddaughter  of  Nicholas  Van  Hom,  who  was  bom  near  New  York 
City  and  was  of  Holland-Dutch  stock.  By  trade  he  was  a  cooper.  Coming 
to  Northampton  county,  Pa.,  he  followed  his  trade  for  a  time,  later  bought  a 
farm  in  Salem  township,  Luzeme  county,  and  moving  to  that  property  spent 
the  remainder  of  his  life  there,  engaged  in  farming.    At  one  time  he  owned 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  645 

considerable  land  now  included  in  the  site  of  New  York  City.  He  and  his 
wife,  whose  maiden  name  was  Shobert,  are  buried  in  Salem  township,  Luzerne 
county.  He  was  a  Democrat  politically,  and  a  Presbyterian  in  religious  faith. 
His  diildren  were:  George,  who  married  Phoebe  Titus;  Aaron;  John,  who 
did  not  marry;  Mary,  Mrs.  Isaac  Titus;  Anne,  Mrs.  William  Thomas;  Eliz- 
abeth, Mrs.  George  Hughes ;  and  Catherine,  who  died  unmarried. 

Aaron  Van  Horn,  Mrs.  Horn's  father,  was  bom  in  April,  1820,  at  Pocono 
Mountain,  Northampton  Co.,  Pa.,  and  died  in  June,  1893,  o^  ^  farm  in  East 
Union  township,  Schuylkill  county.  He  learned  coopering  with  his  father, 
and  later  followed  the  carpenter's  trade.  Moving  to  Salem  township,  Luzerne 
county,  he  operated  his  father's  farm,  the  property  coming  to  him  at  the 
bitter's  death,  and  thence  moved  to  Tamaqua.  For  a  time  he  was  engaged  as 
a  carpenter  by  the  Little  Schuylkill  Railway  Company.  Then  he  went  out 
to  Missouri,  where  he  rented  a  farm  seven  miles  from  Chillicothe,  remain- 
ing there  nine  years,  and  on  his  return  to  Schuylkill  county  he  was  a  car- 
penter at  the  Mahanoy  City  collieries  for  a  while.  But  he  was  anxious  to  get 
on  a  farm  again,  so  his  son-in-law,  William  Horn,  bought  the  place  in  East 
Union  township  previously  mentioned,  and  Mr.  Van  Horn  moved  thereon, 
operating  the  tract  for  five  years.  It  was  there  he  died.  He  married  Eliz- 
abeth Titus,  who  was  bom  in  January,  1826,  in  Nescopeck  township,  Luzerne 
county,  and  died  March  12,  1854,  the  mother  of  six  children:  Rebecca  Mar- 
garet, Mrs.  William  Horn;  Phoebe  Ann,  who  died  young;  Daniel,  unmar- 
ried, who  lives  in  East  Union  township;  George  W.,  who  died  in  infancy; 
Nicholas  Tames,  who  died  in  infancy ;  and  Mary  C,  Mrs.  Morris  Marsh, 
living  in  Connecticut.  Mrs.  Van  Horn  was  buried  in  the  Methodist  cemetery 
at  Tamaqua,  and  Mr.  Van  Horn  in  the  Union  grave)rard  at  Brandonville,  in 
East  Union  township.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Presbyterian  Church,  and  a 
Republican  in  his  political  views. 

Samuel  Titus,  father  of  Mrs.  Elizabeth  (Titus)  Van  Horn,  was  bom  in 
Nescopeck  township,  Luzerne  county,  and  was  of  Scotch-Irish  descent.  He 
was  engaged  as  a  fisherman  on  the  Susquehanna  in  the  days  when  salmon  were 
plentiful  there,  and  was  drowned  in  tnat  river.  He  is  buried  in  Nescopeck 
township.  Mr.  Titus  belonged  to  the  Presbyterian  Church.  His  children 
were:  Isaac,  Daniel,  George  and  Albert  (who  went  out  west  when  young), 
Elizabeth  (Mrs.  Van  Horn),  Phoebe  (who  married  George  Van  Horn)  and 
Mary  (Mrs.  Hiram  Murray). 

LEVI  MILLER,  deceased,  who  was  for  many  years  identified  with  the 
business  and  financial  interests  of  Schuylkill  county,  was  bom  at  Pine  Grove, 
this  county,  in  January,  1853,  son  of  Levi  and  Mary  (Ruth)  Miller. 

Levi  Miller,  the  father,  was  for  a  long  period  engaged  in  business  opera- 
tions in  Schuylkill  county  and  was  a  prominent,  wealthy  and  influential  citizen. 
He  died  in  August,  1887,  his  wife  about  two  years  before.  Their  children 
were:  Daniel  R.,  who  died  in  1902;  George,  who  died  in  1877;  Catherine, 
also  deceased ;  and  Levi. 

After  attending  the  local  schools  of  Pine  Grove  Levi  Miller  entered  Mer- 
cersburg  College  and  was  duly  graduated  therefrom,  and  subsequently  with 
his  father  and  brother  Daniel  R.  was  engaged  in  coal  mining,  in  the  operation 
of  the  Lincoln  and  New  Lincoln  collieries.  Their  offices  were  in  the  brick 
mansion  opposite  the  "Filbert  House,"  now  owned  by  Justice  Gregory  Achen- 
bach,  where  the  Miller  Estate  continued  to  maintain  offices  for  some  time.  The 


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646  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

firm  operating  under  the  name  of  Miller,  Filbert  &  Company  also  conducted 
a  large  business,  and  was  located  in  the  building  afterwards  occupied  by  the 
concern  of  Christ  &  Rehrer.  Mr.  Miller  was  identified  with  and  a  director  of 
the  Pennsylvania  Trust  Company,  of  Reading,  and  the  Pennsylvania  National 
Bank,  of  Pottsville,  for  many  years,  but  had  resigned  from  the  latter  the 
year  before  his  death.  Politically  he  was  a  Republican,  and  fraternally  was 
connected  with  Lodge  No.  49,  F.  &  A.  M.,  being  also  a  thirty-second-degree 
Mason ;  he  was  a  member  of  Camp  No.  49,  Patriotic  Order  Sons  of  America. 
He  served  on  the  school  board  and  assisted  the  community  in  every  possible 
way,  and  was  prominently  connected  with  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Church, 
of  which  he  and  the  other  members  of  his  family  have  always  been  liberal 
supporters. 

Mr.  Miller  had  a  large  relationship,  his  family  connections  reaching  to 
distant  points  in  this  and  other  States,  and  his  sudden  death,  July  31,  1910, 
was  a  shock  not  only  to  his  immediate  relations  and  to  the  community,  but  to 
a  wide  circle  of  friends.  Mr.  Miller  was  laid  to  rest  in  the  New  Lutheran 
Cemetery. 

In  1874  Mr.  Miller  was  united  in  marriage  with  Emma  Eaton,  of  Landis- 
burg,  Pa.,  who  survives  him.  Two  children  were  bom  to  this  union:  Ralph 
E. ;  and  Mary  Ruth,  who  died  in  March,  1906. 

Dr.  Ralph  E.  Miller  began  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Pine  Grove, 
and  after  graduation  from  the  medical  department  of  the  University  of  Penn- 
sylvania served  as  an  interne  at  the  Wilkes-Barre  hospital.  In  July,  1905,  he 
took  up  his  residence  at  Bloomsburg,  Pa.,  where  he  has  since  been  in  the  enjoy- 
ment of  a  large  and  representative  professional  business.  Dr.  Miller  married 
Janette  Nigton,  of  Pine  Grove,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  two  children: 
Ralph  E.,  Jr.,  and  Mary  Ruth. 

ALVIN  KISTLER,  owner  of  a  large  tract  of  land  in  West  Penn  town- 
ship, and  one  of  the  progressive  young  farmers  of  that  section,  has  many  /of 
the  characteristics  which  have  come  to  be  associated  with  the  name  he  bears. 
The  Kistlers  in  this  part  of  Schuylkill  county  are  a  branch  of  an  old  Berks 
county  family  founded  in  this  country  by  Johannes  or  John  George  Kistler, 
and  are  people  of  high  character  and  the  sterling  qualities  pertaining  to  good 
citizenship  and  helpful  lives. 

On  the  records  of  the  Jerusalem  Church  in  Albany  township,  Berks  county, 
known  in  the  eighteenth  century  as  the  Allemangel  Church,  there  are  recorded 
the  baptisms  of  hundreds  of  the  Kistler  children,  while  in  the  cemetery  under 
the  shadow  of  the  church  are  many  graves  marked  with  the  same  name.  Near 
the  center  of  the  oldest  part  of  the  cemetery  lies  a  slate  stone  (which  is  now 
being  replaced  by  the  descendants  with  a  marble  slab)  bearing  the  inscription 
'*I.  G.  K.  1767."  This  is  supposed  to  be  the  stone  that  marked  the  burial 
place  of  the  progenitor  of  the  American  Kistlers,  who  was  legally  known  as 
Johannes,  but  was  called  Joerg  or  George  by  Pastor  Schumacher  in  his  record 
and  Han  joerg  or  John  George  by  his  neighbors. 

Johannes  Kistler  was  a  native  of  the  Palatinate,  in  Germany.  On  Oct. 
5,  1737,  he  came  in  the  ship  *Townshead"  from  Amsterdam  to  Philadelphia, 
and  soon  after  to  Falkner  Swamp,  or  Goshenhoppen,  in  what  is  now  Mont- 
gomery county,  Pa.  It  is  supposed  he  was  accompanied  by  his  wife,  Anna 
Dorothea,  and  his  oldest  children.  In  1747  he  took  out  a  warrant  for  land  and 
moved  to  Albany  township,  Berks  county,  then  wild  and  barren,  where  he 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  647 

made  his  permanent  home.  The  vicinity  was  named  "Allemanger*  or  "All 
Wants."  Johannes  Kistler  was  taxed  in  1756  in  Albany  township,  and  was 
naturalized  in  1761,  on  Sept.  loth  of  which  year  he  and  his  neighbor,  Michael 
Brobst,  appeared  before  the  Supreme  court  at  Philadelphia,  and  there  received 
the  papers  which  made  them  citizens  of  Pennsylvania.  He  was  a  Lutheran, 
and  served  for  a  number  of  years  as  elder  of  the  Allemangel  Church,  where 
his  children  were  baptized  and  confirmed.  His  children  were:  (i)  Jacob  left 
seven  children,  Philip,  Jacob,  Michael,  Solomon,  Daniel,  Catharine  and  Magda- 
lene. Samuel  Kistler  Brobst,  a  teacher  of  James  A.  Garfield,  was  a  grand- 
son of  Philip;  and  so  was  Michael  Kistler,  the  tanner,  whose  son  Stephen 
was  at  one  time  the  most  extensive  tanner  in  eastern  Pennsylvania.  (2)  John 
remained  on  the  homestead  after  his  father's  death.  The  name  John  runs 
through  at  least  five  generations  and  the  trade  of  blacksmith  follows  it.  John's 
children  were:  John  William,  bom  May  29,  1757;  and  Abraham,  born  Dec. ^ 
20,  1 761,  who  is  the  ancestor  of  the  Perry  county  Kistlers,  for  whom  Kistler 
post  office  was  named.  A  descendant.  Rev.  Dr.  John  Kistler,  has  for  many 
years  been  professor  at  the  oldest  Lutheran  Theological  Seminary  in  America, 
located  at  Hartwick,  N.  J.  (3)  George  remained  in  Berks  county.  In  1779 
he  was  the  owner  of  248  acres  of  land  and  a  gristmill.  In  1778  he  was 
elected  elder  of  the  Allemangel  Church,  and  as  he  was  referred  to  as  George 
Kistler,  Sr.,  he  doubtless  had  a  son  George.  The  archives  of  Pennsylvania 
show  that  a  George  Kistler  served  in  the  Continental  army  during  the  war 
of  the  Revolution.  (4)  Philip,  bom  Oct.  19,  1745,  is  next  m  the  line  we  are 
tracing.  (5)  Michael  moved  to  Ohio,  and  is  the  ancestor  of  the  large  Kistler 
settlements  in  Indiana.  His  family  consisted  of  John,  Michael,  Joseph,  Nathan, 
Monroe,  Salome  and  Judith.  (6)  Samuel,  the  youngest  son  of  his  father, 
married  Elizabeth  Ladich  and  Catharine  Brobst,  and  had  three  children  by  his 
first  marriage  and  twelve  by  the  second.  (7)  Barbara  married  (first)  a  Brobst 
and  (second)  Michael  Mosser,  of  LowhiU.  (8)  Dorothea  married  Michael 
Reinhart.     (9)  Elizabeth  married  a  Mr.  Keller,  near  Hamburg,  Pennsylvania. 

Philip  Kistler,  son  of  George,  above,  was  bom  Oct.  19,  1745,  and  died 
Aug.  28,  1809.  He  had  nine  children:  Jacob,  John,  Ferdinand,  Philip, 
Jonathan,  Barbara,  Maria,  Catherine  and  Elizabeth.  Of  these,  Jacob  was  a 
lieutenant  in  the  war  of  181 2. 

Jonathan  Kistler,  son  of  Philip,  was  bom  Nov.  10,  1799,  in  Berks  county, 
and  was  raised  on  the  place  where  his  grandson  Charles  S.  Kistler  now  lives. 
He  was  reared  by  Jacob  Wehr,  worked  among  farmers  while  young,  and 
after  he  married  started  out  for  himself.  In  1829  he  built  the  gristmill  which 
still  stands  and  is  known  as  the  Kistler  mill.  He  also  became  the  owner  of 
about  two  hundred  acres  of  land,  a  great  deal  of  which  he  cleared  and  culti- 
vated, following  milling  and  farming  on  this  place  until  his  death,  which 
occurred  when  he  was  about  seventy-nine  years  of  age.  His  wife,  Sarah 
(Shellhammer),  bom  Aug.  4,  1800,  daughter  of  Simon  and  Catherine  (Long) 
Shellhammer,  died  aged  eighty-one  years.  They  were  the  parents  of  children 
as  follows:  Polly  married  Michael  Houser;  Rebecca  married  Jacob  Wert- 
man;  Hannah  married  Joseph  Shaeffer;  Daniel  married  Rebecca  Sechler; 
David,  who  resides  in  West  Penn  township,  married  Mary  Hagenbuch,  i?ow 
deceased ;  John  is  mentioned  below ;  William,  who  was  a  school  teacher,  never 
married;  Nathan  never  married;  Jonathan  K.  married  Lydia  Shellhammer; 
Elizabeth  married  Timothy  Zehner.  The  father  retired  some  years  before 
his  death.    He  took  an  active  part  in  politics  as  a  member  of  the  Democratic 


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648  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

party,*  and  was  a  justice  of  the  peace  for  forty-four  years,  and  a  leader  in 
Zion's  Lutheran  Church,  in  West  Penn  township,  serving  as  elder,  deacon  and 
trustee.    He  and  his  wife  are  buried  at  that  church. 

John  Kistler,  son  of  Jonathan,  was  bom  March  24,  1832,  in  West  Penn 
township,  and  was  educated  there.  He  assisted  with  the  work  on  his  father's 
farm  while  young,  and  later  bought  the  farm  of  about  seventy-five  acres  where 
Ambrose  Lechleitner  now  resides.  He  operated  that  farm  for  a  number  of 
years,  sold  it,  and  bought  the  farm  of  ninety  acres  which  is  now  owned  by  his 
son,  Albert  S.  Of  this  farm,  about  eighty  acres  are  cleared.  Mr.  Kistler 
carried  on  general  farming,  and  for  many  years  also  followed  the  stonemason's 
trade,  which  he  learned  when  he  was  a  young  man.  He  attended  market  at 
Tamaqua.  Mr.  Kistler  was  an  active  man  up  to  the  time  of  his  death,  which 
occurred  Nov.  23,  1909.  He  is  buried  in  the  cemetery  of  Zion's  Lutheran 
Church  in  West  Penn  township,  of  which  church  he  was  a  devout  member 
and  faithful  official,  serving  as  elder  and  deacon.  He  held  the  township 
office  of  school  director,  and  was  a  Democrat  in  politics. 

Mr.  Kistler's  first  wife,  Caroline  (Hagenbuch),  was  bom  March  4,  1836, 
daughter  of  Amos  and  Sarah  (Bailey)  Hagenbuch,  and  died  Jan.  19,  1856, 
the  mother  of  one  child,  Jonathan,  born  July  6,  1855.  He  is  married  to  Alvina 
Mantz,  and  they  reside  at  Allentown,  Pa.  Mrs.  Kistler  is  buried  at  Zion's 
Church  in  West  Penn  township.  For  his  second  wife  Mr.  Kistler  married 
Cordelia  Hagenbuch,  who  was  bom  March  10,  1839,  a  sister  of  his  first  wife, 
and  a  large  family  came  to  this  union:  William,  bom  July  15,  1858,  married 
Ella  Meyerhoff ,  and  their  children  are  Rosie,  Bert  and  Raymond ;  Mkry,  bom 
Nov.  18,  1859,  died  Feb.  22,  i860;  Sarah,  bom  Dec.  27,  i860,  married  Uriah 
Reber,  of  NeflFs  (P.  O.),  Lehigh  Co.,  Pa.,  and  has  children,  William,  Charles, 
Ralph,  Jennie,  Francis  and  Harvey;  Amanda,  bom  June  i,  1863,  died  Feb.  4, 
1884,  the  wife  of  Mahlon  Lutz  and  mother  of  one  child,  Laura,  who  is  deceased ; 
Alice  was  bom  April  28,  1865 ;  Ida,  bom  March  26,  1868,  married  William 
Brobst,  of  Owl  Creek,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  has  had  three  children,  Charles, 
Mabel  (deceased)  and  Alice;  Oliver  was  born  Jan.  4,  1870;  Franklin,  bom 
Dec.  8,  1871,  died  aged  forty  years;  Amandus,  bom  Aug.  18,  1873,  lives  in 
Missouri ;  Rosa,  bom  Jan.  9,  1876,  is  married  to  John  Nester,  of  Tamaqua, 
knd  has  had  two  children,  Mary  (deceased)  and  Herbert;  one  sort  died  in 
infancy;  Albert  S.  is  a  farmer  in  West  Penn  township;  Alvin  is  mentioned 
below.  The  mother  of  this  family  is  now  living  at  the  home  of  David  K.  Kist- 
ler, in  West  Penn  township. 

Alvin  Kistler  was  bom  May  11,  1881,  in  West  Penn  township,  and  edu- 
cated in  the  public  schools  there.  Until  twenty-seven  years  of  age  he  worked 
for  his  father  on  the  home  farm,  this  being  the  place  his  brother  Albert  now 
owns,  in  West  Penn  township.  When  he  left  the  home  farm  he  bought  the 
tract  where  he  now  lives,  from  Isaac  Gerber,  having  originally  224  acres, 
thirty-eight  of  which  he  sold  to  the  Lehigh  &  New  England  Railroad  Com- 
pany. Of  the  remainder,  186  acres,  there  are  about  one  hundred  acres  under 
cultivation,  devoted  to  general  farming  and  tmcking.  Mr.  Kistler  markets 
his  produce  to  Tamaqua,  making  regular  trips  there,  both  winter  and  summer. 
His  affairs  have  prospered  under  strict  attention,  but  he  also  finds  time  for 
matters  of  general  interest,  takes  an  active  part  in  the  workings  of  the 
Democratic  party,  and  has  served  as  election  inspector.  He  is  a  member  ot 
Washington  Camp  No.  615,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  at  Andreas,  Pa.,  and  of  Zions 
Lutheran  Church  in  West  Penn  township. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  649 

Mr.  Kistler  is  married  to  Sadie  Agnes  Gerber,  who  was  bom  Sept.  3,  1879, 
in  West  Penn  township,  a  daughter  of  Phaon  and  Harriet  (Romig)  Gerber, 
and  they  are  the  parents  of  five  children,  bom  as  follows :  Percy  Albert,  Aug. 
8,  1903;  Edward  Leroy,  Jan.  15,  1906;  Myrtle  Harriet,  July  4,  1908;  John 
William,  Oct.  24,  1910;  Frank  Francis,  Feb.  28,  1913.  The  children  old 
enough  are  attending  school  in  the  township.  Mrs.  Kistler  was  educated  in 
West  Penn  township  and  lived  at  home  until  her  marriage.  She  is  a  member 
of  Zion's  Reformed  Church,  in  West  Penn  township,  of  which  Rev.  H.  D. 
Houtz  is  pastor,  and  attends  the  Sunday  school  of  that  organization. 

The  G^rbers  are  a  very  old  and  much  respected  family  m  West  Penn  town- 
ship. Reuben  Gerber,  great-grandfather  of  Mrs.  Kistler,  was  bora  on  a 
small  tract  which  is  now  the  property  of  Alvin  Kistler,  and  followed  farming. 
His  wife's  maiden  name  was  Houser,  and  they  had  the  following  children: 
Isaac,  David,  Edwin,  John  (deceased),  Caroline  (Mrs.  Kistler)  and  EUavina 
(widow  of  Jacob  Dietrich,  living  at  Tamaqua).  The  father  was  a  Democrat 
in  politics.  His  reli|^ous  connection  was  with  Zion's  Reformed  Church,  and 
both  parents  are  buned  at  that  church. 

Edwin  Gerber,  the  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Alvin  Kistler,  was  bora  in  1822, 
and  died  March  13,  1898.  He  was  a  native  of  West  Penn  township,  where 
he  lived  and  died,  and  followed  farming  all  his  life,  cultivating  the  place  now 
owned  by  his  son  Frank.  He  married  Sarah  Moyer,  who  was  bora  Dec.  31, 
1834,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Salome  (Baer)  Moyer,  and  survives  him,  living 
with  her  son  Franklin  in  West  Penn  township.  They  had  three  children: 
Franklin  married  Angeline  Eckert;  Phaon  was  the  father  of  Mrs.  Kistler; 
Amandus  died  young.  Mr.  Gerber  is  buried  in  the  cemetery  of  Zion's 
Church  in  West  Penn  township,  of  which  he  was  a  Reformed  member. 
Politically  he  was  a  Democrat. 

Phaon  Gerber,  Mrs.  Kistler's  father,  was  bom  in  West  Penn  township 
Aug.  2,  1855,  and  died  Sept.  24,  1908.  He  was  educated  in  his  native  town- 
ship, and  worked  for  his  father  until  twenty-one  years  old,  after  which  he  was 
employed  one  year  on  a  farm  in  Packer  township.  Carbon  county.  He  mar- 
ried and  returned  to  West  Penn  township,  and  then  bougnt  a  farm  of  forty- 
eight  acres  from  his  father,  remaining  on  it  the  rest  of  his  life.  Besides  farm- 
ing he  did  woo4  chopping,  and  marketed  his  produce  to  Tamaqua.  On  Jan. 
17,  1879,  he  was  married  at  Weatherly,  Carbon  Co.,  Pa.,  by  Rev.  M.  H. 
Mishler,  to  Harriet  Romig,  a  native  of  Quakake,  Carbon  county,  daughter  of 
John  and  Rosanna  (Faust)  Romig,  and  six  children  were  bora  to  this  union: 
Sadie  Agies,  wife  of  Alvin  Kistler;  Eva  Rosanna,  bora  Sept.  24,  1882,  mar- 
ried to  Claude  Steigerwalt;  Oscar  Frank,  bora  April  20,  1884,  who  married 
Jennie  Knapp;  Mahlon  John,  bora  Nov.  4,  1889,  married  to  Katie  Clause; 
Elmer  Edward,  twin  of  Mahlon,  married  to  Lena  Behler;  and  Stella  Adeline, 
bora  July  26,  1896,  living  at  home.  The  mother  is  still  residing  on  the  home 
farm.  Mr.  Gerber  was  a  Democrat  in  political  faith.  Socially  he  belonged  to 
the  Order  of  Independent  Americans,  being  a  member  of  Pocahontas  Coun- 
cil, No.  406,  at  Chain,  Pa.,  and  he  was  an  active  member  of  the  Reformed 
congregation  of  Zion's  Church  in  West  Penn  township,  which  he  served  faith- 
fully as  elder.    He  is  buried  at  that  church. 

Benjamin  Romig,  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Phaon  Gerber,  was  a  farmer,  and 
one  of  the  original  settlers  at  Weatherly,  Carbon  county.  At  one  time  he  was 
the  owner  of  every  foot  of  land  on  which  the  borough  of  Weatheriy  now 
stands.     His  children  were:     Nathan;  John;   Sarah,   who  married   Daniel 


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650  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA- 

Faust  (he  is  deceased)  ;  Judith,  who  was  the  wife  of  the  late  John  Lomison; 
Susan,  who  was  the  wife  of  the  late  Edwin  Young;  Mary,  who  died  unmar- 
ried; and  Matilda,  Mrs.  Solomon  Gerhard.  Mrs.  Gerhard  is  now  the  only 
survivor  of  the  family.  Benjamin  Romig  was  a  Democrat  and  a  member  of 
the  Reformed  Church.     He  is  buried  at  Quakake. 

John  Romig,  son  of  Benjamin,  was  bom  in  February,  1824,  passed  all  his 
life  in  Packer  township,  Carbon  county,  and  lived  retired  for  about  thirty 
years  before  his  death.  He  built  a  house  on  the  ground  now  occupied  by  the 
Warner  store  at  Weatherly  and  a  .sawmill  where  the  borough  building  now 
stands.  He  was  a  successful  farmer,  a  public-spirited  citizen,  and  a  stanch 
supporter  of  the  common  schools,  a  kind-heartecf  neighbor,  a  good  father,  and 
a  faithful  member  of  the  Reformed  Church  at  Quakake,  in  whose  work  he 
was  always  active.  He  served  as  elder,  deacon  and  trustee  of  his  church,  and 
was  a  popular  township  official,  holding  all  the  local  offices.  Politically  he 
was  a  Democrat.  He  married  Rosanna  Faust,  daughter  of  John  Faust,  and 
they  are  buried  at  Quakake.  They  had  children  as  follows :  Emma  married 
Henry  Englehart;  Harriet  married  Phaon  Gerber;  Frank  married  Ella  Flick- 
inger  and  they  made  their  home  at  Williamsport,  Pa. ;  Alfred  married  Emma 
Heller,  and  settled  at  Freeland,  Pa.;  Sophia  married  J.  J.  Gerhard;  Adeline 
married  Lewis  Bender,  of  Scranton,  Pa. ;  Elizabeth  married  George  Ulshaef er, 
of  Weatherly,  Pa. ;  Abigail  married  Edward  Kester,  of  AUentown,  Pa. ;  Matilda 
married  Levi  Englehart,  of  Weatherly;  Rosanna  married  Charles  Gray,  of 
Weatherly ;  John  is  next  in  the  family ;  Mary  married  Henry  Hagenbuch,  of 
Nazareth,  Pennsylvania. 

GOTTLIEB  E.  SCHREPPLE  is  one  of  the  progressive  business  men  of 
Ashland,  where  he  has  built  up  a  modem  laundry  plant,  which  gives  employ- 
ment to  several  people. 

The  Schrepples  are  of  German  extraction,  Nicholas  Schrepple,  grand- 
father of  Gottlieb  E.  Schrepple,  coming  to  America  at  an  early  age,  and 
settling  on  a  farm  near  Ashland,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  carried  on 
agricultural  pursuits  until  his  death.  His  son,  Frederick  Schrepple,  was 
bom  in  Germany,  came  with  his  parents  to  America,  and  like  his  father  fol- 
lowed farming  until  he  died,  March  14,  1906.  He  married  Loretta  Buchpies, 
like  himself  a  native  of  Germany,  daughter  of  Elias  Buchpies,  who  came  to 
America  many  years  ago  and  settled  on  land  near  Ashland,  which  he  took  up. 
He  cleared  this  property  and  farmed  there  until  his  death.  Mrs.  Loretta 
Schrepple  died  in  1874.    Of  her  two  children,  the  daughter  is  now  deceased. 

Gottlieb  E.  Schrepple,  son  of  Frederick  and  Loretta  Schrepple,  was  bom 
Oct.  8,  1870,  on  a  farm  near  Ashland,  and  received  his  education  in  the  pub- 
lic schools  of  that  neighborhood.  When  old  enough  he  began  work  on  the 
home  farm,  continuing  to  live  there  until  his  thirtieth  year,  m  January,  1900, 
moving  to  Ashland,  where  he  has  since  been  in  business.  Upon  his  removal 
here  he  bought  the  laundry  business  of  Mr.  Bright,  which  he  carried  on  for 
about  one  year,  then  buying  his  present  business.  Under  his  management  it 
has  enlarged  steadily,  and  as  his  capital  has  increased  Mr.  Schrepple  has 
improved  his  facilities  for  carrying  on  the  large  trade  he  has  established,  his 
plant  being  now  equipped  with  highly  improved  machinery  and  being  conducted 
along  modem  lines.  It  is  known  as  the  Ashland  Steam  Laundry.  The  modem 
system  in  use  enables  the  force  employed  to  accomplish  the  large  amount  of 
work  with  dispatch,  and  Mr.  Schrepple  has  shown  himself  competent  to  take 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  .    651 

care  of  his  growing  trade  and  to  provide  for  it  as  its  demands  arise.  He  has 
his  business  m  a  two-story  house,  in  which  is  also  the  flat  where  he  makes 
his  home.  His  business  is  recognized  as  a  distinct  convenience  to  the  town, 
and  under  Mr.  Schrepple's  efficient  management  is  one  of  its  creditable  indus- 
trial plants. 

On  June  24,  1901,  Mr.  Schrepple  married  Mary  E.  Kimmel,  of  Pottsville, 
Schuylkill  county,  who  was  bom  at  Ashland,  daughter  of  Charles  and  Susan 
A.  Kimmel,  early  settlers  of  Ashland,  of  German  extraction.  Mr.  Kimmel  died 
April  22,  1894,  and  is  survived  by  his  wife.  Two  children  Have  been  born  to 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Schrepple:  Mildred  A.  and  Arthur  Louis.  Mr.  Schrepple  and 
his  wife  are  members  of  the  German  Lutheran  Church. 

CHRISTIAN  NEIDLINGER,  a  farmer  of  Porter  township,  Schuylkill 
county,  was  born  at  Tower  City,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  Dec.  7,  1843,  son  of 
Jonathan  and  Anna  Maria  (Romberger)  Neidlinger,  and  a  grandson  of  Peter 
Neidlinger. 

Peter  Neidlinger  was  born  in  1777,  in  Germany,  and  when  a  young  man 
emigrated  to  America  and  settled  as  a  pioneer  in  the  Mahantongo  Valley  of 
Pennsylvania.  For  many  years  he  carried  on  farming  in  Dauphin  county, 
but  in  later  life  went  to  Fort  Wayne,  Ind.,  where  his  death  occurred  July  9, 
1857.  His  wife,  Catherine,  was  torn  in  1779,  and  died  at  the  age  of  eighty- 
three  years,  in  Dauphin  county.  Pa.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following 
children :  George,  who  died  in  the  West ;  Jacob,  who  also  passed  away  there ; 
Jonathan,  the  father  of  Christian;  Polly;  Elizabeth;  Leah;  Lydia;  Nathan; 
Judd;  David,  and  Sallie. 

Jonathan  Neidlinger  was  bom  May  6,  1805,  in  Mahanton|;o,  Pa.,  and  there 
was  reared  to  manhood.  He  early  adopted  farming  as  his  life  work,  and  for 
some  time  cultivated  a  property  in  Rush  township,  Dauphin  county,  but 
later  disposed  of  this  and  bought  a  farm  at  Orwin,  Porter  township,  Schuyl- 
kill county,  on  which  he  spent  the  remaining  years  of  his  life,  passing  away 
Sept.  II,  1891,  aged  eighty-six  years,  four  months,  five  days.  Mr.  Neidlinger 
was  one  of  the  good  farmers  and  substantial  ;nen  of  Orwin,  and  in  his  death 
his  community  lost  one  of  its  most  stable  and  highly  respected  citizens.  He 
married  Anna  Maria  Romberger,  who  was  bom  Nov.  5,  1805,  and  who  died 
Jan.  4,  1877,  aged  seventy-one  years,  nine  months,  twenty-nine  days.  Both 
are  buried  in  the  Orwin  cemetery.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Neidlinger  were  the  par- 
ents of  the  following  children  besides  Christian:  Elizabeth,  who  married 
John  Maus;  Amanda,  who  married  Henry  Eichenlaub;  Henry,  who  died  at 
Orwin;  Matilda,  who  married  William  Shaale;  John,  living  at  Williamstown, 
Dauphin  Co.,  Pa. ;  Jonathan,  who  died  young;  Lucy,  who  is  the  wife  of  Thomas 
Fegley;  and  Eva,  whose  death  occurred  in  young  womanhood. 

Christian  Neidlinger  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  and  remained  at  home 
until  he  was  twenty-six  years  of  age.  At  that  time  he  was  married  and 
removed  to  Orwin,  where  he  was  employed  at  the  East  and  West  Brookside 
collieries,  making  his  home  at  Orwin  for  a  period  of  six  years.  He  then  took 
up  his  residence  in  Rush  township,  Dauphin  county,  where  he  also  resided 
for  six  years,  following  which  for  two  years  his  home  was  at  Tower  City. 
Returning  at  that  time  to  Rush  township,  he  worked  five  years  for  his  father, 
and  after  the  elder  man's  death  bought  the  family  homestead,  which  he  cul- 
tivated for  fifteen  years  with  a  satisfying  degree  of  success.  In  191 1  he  dis- 
posed of  his  interests  there  and  purchased  a  small  tract  of  land  near  Greenwood 


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652  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

cemetery  in  Porter  township,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  is  now  making  his 
home.  He  has  a  well  improved  property  with  good  buildings  and  modem 
equipment  and  is  known  as  a  progressive  and  industrious  farmer. 

On  July  26  1870,  Mr.  Neidlinger  was  married  to  Mary  Shadle,  daughter 
of  John  and  Hannah  (Hain)  Shadle,  and  to  this  union  there  have  been  bom 
the  following  children:  John  Henry,  who  in  addition  to  carrying  on  agri- 
cultural pursuits  in  Porter  township  is  employed  as  a  hoisting  engineer  at  the 
West  Brookside  colliery;  Charles  William,  of  Beaver  Falls,  Pa.,  who  is  a 
conductor  for  the  Pittsburgh  &  Lake  Erie  Railroad  Company;  George  Daniel 
an  electrician  by  vocation,  living  at  Emporium,  Pa. ;  Edward  N.,  of  Harris- 
burg,  Pa.,  a  brakeman  in  the  Reading  railroad  yards;  Harry  Jonathan,  who 
resides  with  his  parents  and  is  water  boss  at  the  East  Brookside  colliery; 
Reuben  C,  residing  at  Tower  City,  who  is  hoisting  engineer  at  the  West  Brook- 
side colliery;  Emery  C,  of  Reading,  employed  in  the  freight  department  of 
the  Reading  Company;  Milton  H.,  who  is  employed  as  a  fireman  by  the  Read- 
ing Railway  Company  at  Harrisburg;  Elvin  Raymond,  who  is  a  pipe  fitter  of 
Emporium,  Pa. ;  Robert  N.,  a  graduate  of  the  Keystone  State  Normal  School, 
at  Kutztown,  Pa.,  class  of  1915,  and  now  a  popular  teacher  in  the  public 
schools  of  Porter  township;  and  Arthur  H.,  who  is  employed  as  a  pipe  fitter 
at  Emporium.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Neidlinger,  in  addition  to  rearing  their  eleven 
sons  to  lives  of  usefulness,  have  adopted  a  daughter,  Lydia  Bechtel,  daughter 
of  John  and  Estelle  (Kone)  Bechtel.  She  was  seven  years  old  when  she  entered 
their  home  and  is  now  thirteen,  a  bright  and  promising  student  in  the  public 
schools. 

Mr.  Neidlinger  has  always  been  a  friend  of  education,  and  has  served  on 
the  school  board  of  Porter  township  for  a  number  of  years,  while  his  other 
public  service  has  taken  the  form  of  faithful  discharge  of  the  duties  of  the 
offices  of  township  assessor,  supervisor  and  treasurer.  He  is  steward  of  the 
United  Brethren  Church,  has  been  active  also  in  the  Greenwood  Sunday 
school,  and  at  this  tim^  is  its  treasurer.  Fraternally  he  is  affiliated  with  the 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  at  Tower  City. 

JOHN  G.  KOPP,  Sr.,  of  Tower  City,  is  now  living  retired  after  a  long 
and  industrious  career,  most  of  which  was  spent  in  a  responsible  capacity 
with  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Company. 

Mr.  Kopp  was  bora  July  9,  1841,  at  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  son  of 
John  Kopp,  a  native  of  Prussia,  Germany,  who  came  to  this  country  in  young 
manhood  and  settled  at  Pottsville.  He  began  as  a  day  worker  at  the  mines, 
and  after  two  years  was  made  a  foreman  at  Reed's  colliery,  near  Pottsville. 
Later  he  moved  to  Tremont,  this  county,  where  he  was  also  a  mine  boss,  and 
there  he  died  when  forty-eight  years  old.  He  was  one  of  the  pioneer  miners 
in  this  region.  Mr.  Kopp  married  Catherine  Biltz,  a  native  of  Germany, 
who  came  to  America  when  eleven  years  old,  and  died  at  the  age  of  forty-four 
years.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Kopp  are  buried  at  Tremont.  They  were  the  parents  of 
six  children:  Caroline,  wife  of  William  Heckler;  John  G. ;  Lewis,  w|io  lives 
at  Sharadin,  this  county ;  Augustus,  deceased ;  Elizabeth,  deceased ;  and  Kate, 
who  is  married  to  Peter  Krebs  and  lives  in  California. 

John  G.  Kopp,  Sr.,  was  but  eight  years  old  when  he  commenced  to  work 
in  the  coal  breaker  as  a  slate  picker.  Later  he  worked  with  his  father  as  a 
laborer,  and  by  the  time  he  was  fourteen  he  was  a  skilled  miner.  This  was  at 
the  Major  White's  colliery,  Swatara,  near  New  Town,  Pa.     From  there  hl» 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  653 

went  to  the  Middle  Creek  colliery,  under  Theodore  Garrison,  and  worked  as 
a  miner  with  his  brother  Lewis,  for  several  years,  and  from  this  place  he 
went  to  work  at  Colket  colliery,  Donaldson,  Pa.  He  worked  a  while  there  and 
then  changed  to  the  Lower  Rausch  Creek  colliery,  where  he  remained  several 
years,  from  there  going  to  the  East  Franklin  colliery,  operated  under  Harry 
Heil.  and.  later  by  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Company.  He 
worked  there  about  eight  years,  when  he  was  taken  to  the  West  Brookside 
colliery.  Tower  City,  to  become  an  under  boss,  under  William  Elliott,  inside 
foreman,  and  a  little  later  he  became  inside  foreman  in  Mr.  Elliott's  place 
The  colliery  was  operated  by  the  P.  &  R.  C.  &  I.  Co.,  and  General  Pleasants 
was  general  manager.  He  held  the  position  of  Inside  Foreman  for  thirty- 
seven  years  at  the  aforesaid  colliery,  retiring  therefrom  in  1912.  Mr.  Kopp's 
honorable  life  won  him  the  esteem  of  all  with  whom  he  came  in  contact,  the 
men  in  his  charge  as  well  as  his  superiors,  and  he  has  many  friends  among 
his  old-time  associates.  Fraternally  he  is  one  of  the  best  known  men  in  his 
part  of  Schuylkill  county.  He  is  one  of  the  oldest  members  of  Lodge  No.  267, 
F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Tremont ;  has  been  a  member  of  Tremont  Lodge,  No.  245,  I. 
O.  O.  F.,  since  Feb.  23,  1866,  and  is  a  past  officer  of  that  body ;  belongs  to  the 
Odd  Fellows  Encampment,  in  which  he  has  passed  all  the  chairs;  to  the 
Knights  of  Pythias  lodge  at  Muir,  Pa.;  and  to  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  camp  at 
Tower  City,  as  well  as  the  commandery  of  that  order. 

Mr.  Kopp  married  Elizabeth  Hatter,  of  the  Mahantongo  Valley,  and  they 
have  had  a  large  family:  William  Jerome  died  when  two  years  old;  Delia 
is  the  wife  of  George  W.  Hatch ;  John  G.,  Jr.,  Harry  L.,  Robert  E.  and  Chab- 
bat  L.,  all  live  at  Tower  City;  Bessie  is  married  to  Edw.  Rank,  D.  D.  S. ; 
Blanch  is  the  wife  of  Peter  Klinger;  Flossie  is  at  home;  five  other  children 
died  young.    The  family  are  Lutherans  in  religious  connection. 

REV.  DENNIS  J.  MELLEY,  pastor  of  St.  Mary's  Catholic  Church  at 
Tremont,  has  been  stationed  in  Schuylkill  county  the  greater  part  of  the  time 
since  his  ordination,  and  his  present  charge  is  one  of  the  most  important  in 
this  region.  Established  in  1853,  it  has  prospered  steadily  in  the  sixty  and 
more  years  of  its  existence,  and  is  now  ministering  to  the  religious  needs  of  a 
large  number  of  the  faith  in  and  around  Tremont.  The  original  church,  built 
in  1853,  was  Sufficient  for  the  requirements  of  the  congregation  until  1885, 
when  it  was  materially  enlarged,  the  capacity  being  almost  doubled.  The 
interior  was  then  completely  remodeled  and  handsomely  decorated,  the  walls 
and  ceiling  being  handsomely  frescoed.  The  paintings  in  the  sanctuary,  and 
on  the  walls  and  ceiling,  are  of  exceptional  mprit.  At  the  time  the  church  was 
rebuilt  ten  memorial  windows  were  donated  by  various  members,  and  the  old 
altar  was  replaced  by  a  beautiful  one  of  Italian  marble,  said  to  be  one  of  the 
finest  productions  of  the  famous  maker,  Stewart,  of  Philadelphia.  On  it  are 
inscribed  the  names  of  those  who  contributed  towards  it,  about  one  hundred 
and  thirty.  The  church  property  has  been  undergoing  constant  improvement. 
The  old  parsonage  was  replaced  by  a  beautiful  new  priest's  home  during  the 
pastorate  of  Father  McDevitt,  under  whose  energetic  administration  the  church 
had  been  remodeled  and  enlarged.  The  fine  grove  adjoining  the  parsonage 
was  leased  and  laid  out  in  drives  and  walks,  providing  a  delightful  surrounding 
for  the  residence,  which  has  been  improved  and  added  to  from  time  to  time. 
The  grove  is  still  leased. 

For  the  first  two  years  of  its  existence  St.  Mary's  was  under  the  charge  of 


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654  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Rev.  Sylvester  Eagle,  and  the  membership  when  he  came  was  about  one 
hundred.  It  increased  considerably  during  his  pastorate.  In  1855  Rev.  Wil- 
liam McLaughlin  was  sent  to  Tremont  and  here  ended  his  days  in  successful 
administration,  remaining  until  his  death  in  the  early  part  of  i8i67.  He  became 
very  popular,  not  only  with  his  parishioners  but  among  the  townspeople 
generally.  His  successor,  Father  Marran,  was  here  until  1869,  in  May  of 
which  year  Rev.  John  Cox  took  charge.  At  the  beginning  of  1872  he  left  and 
for  the  next  two  years  Rev.  Thomas  Toner  was  pastor,  Father  Cox  returning 
at  the  end  of  that  time  and  continuing  his  services  until  1876.  In  May,  1876, 
Rev.  Francis  X.'  George  was  installed  in  the  parish  and  remained  until  Decem- 
ber, 1878,  when  Rev.  P.  W.  Brennan  arrived.  The  next  priest  was  Rev.  John 
J.  McDevitt,  who  had  a  long  pastorate,  beginning  in  November,  1880,  and 
extending  until  1900.  He  was  a  zealous  worker,  and  not  only  did  notable 
work  for  the  church  but  also  exerted  great  influence  in  the  affairs  of  the 
borough.  He  had  the  breadth  of  view  which  enabled  him  to  see  the  importance 
of  desirable  living  conditions  in  the  conmiunity  and  directed  much  of  his  labor 
towards  that  end,  making  a  record  for  public  spirit  and  foresight  which  won 
him  the  name  of  being  one  of  the  most  useful  citizens  of  the  town.  He  offered 
td  bear  a  large  share  of  the  cost  of  laying  out  a  small  public  park  in  the 
borough.  As  previously  mentioned,  the  church  was  remodeled  during  his 
pastorate,  the  membership  having  shown  a  great  increase  during  his  control, 
reaching  1,500  to  2,000.  The  duties  became  so  heavy  that  the  Archbishop 
appointed  an  assistant.  Rev.  John  Carey,  who  came  in  June,  1891,  to  lighten 
them  somewhat,  and  besides  looking  after  the  congregation  of  St.  Mary's  they 
held  services  at  Blackwood.  There  is  now  a  separate  church  at  Blackwood, 
which  is  a  mission  of  Branchdale.  In  1885  Father  McDevitt  had  commenced 
holding  services  at  Tower  City,  now  also  a  separate  parish,  and  as  a  result  a 
congregation  was  gathered  there  which  in  a  few  years  built  a  handsome  church. 

Rev.  John  J.  McDevitt  resigned  on  account  of  ill  health  in  1900,  and  died 
in  St.  Agnes*  hospital,  Philadelphia,  in  1901.  He  was  succeeded  by  Rev. 
Francis  Ward,  of  Tower  City.  During  Father  Ward's  pastorate  of  ten  years 
he  remodeled  and  decorated  the  interior  of  the  church,  built  an  addition  to  the 
rectory,  and  built  a  handsome  mission  church  at  Keffer's,  on  the  Broad  moun- 
tain (supplied  by  the  priest  of  Tremont),  in  which  the  people  of  the  neigh- 
boring mining  villages  worship.  His  assistants  at  various  times  were  Rev. 
John  Burk,  now  of  Philadelphia,  Rev.  Bernard  McKenna,  now  secretary  to 
Bishop  Shahan  of  the  Catholic  University  of  America  at  Washington,  D.  C, 
and  Rev.  Edgar  Cook,  who  had  labored  for  years  on  the  Philippine  missions. 
Father  Cook's  health  became  impaired  by  his  hard  labors  in  the  Philippine 
Islands,  and  he  was  obliged  to  resign  his  curacy  of  Tremont ;  he  died  in  Phila- 
delphia in  1907.    He  was  the  last  assistant  at  Tremont. 

Father  Ward  was  succeeded  in  Tremont  by  Rev.  D.  J.  Melley  May  11, 
191 1.  During  Father  Melley's  pastorate  he  has  beautified  the  sanctuary  of 
the  church  and  completed  the  marble  altar,  which  had  hitherto  remained  unfin- 
ished, by  placing  a  marble  throne  or  baldachin  over  the  tabernacle  of  the 
main  ahar.  This  throne  was  made  from  Carrara  marble  by  Da  Prato,.  of 
New  York.  It  is  of  a  very  neat  design,  and  crowned  by  a  cap  of  Venetian 
mosaics,  at  a  cost  of  four  hundred  and  fifty  dollars.  Two  hundred  and  fifty 
dollars  of  this  amount  was  given  for  this  purpose  by  Miss  Julia  Sheehan,  of 
Tremont.  The  interior  of  the  church  as  it  appears  to-day  is  the  neatest  in 
Schuylkill  county.    Father  Melley  renovated  the  rectory,  both  the  interior  and 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  655 

exterior,  so  that  to-day  it  is  without  exception  the  most  beautiful  rectory  in 
this  part  of  the  diocese.  Nor  has  he  devoted  all  his  time  to  the  material 
upbuilding  of  the  parish,  the  spiritual  side  receiving  still  greater  attention.  He 
has  labored  indefatigably  for  the  welfare  of  his  people,  administering  to  their 
spiritual  wants  at  all  times.  As  evidence  of  this  there  are  to-day  attached 
to  the  church  a  Holy  Name  Society,  large  in  proportion  to  the  number  of 
parishioners;  a  Sodality  of  the  Blessed  Virgin  Mary;  a  branch  of  the  League 
of  the  Sacred  Heart  of  Jesus,  and  an  Altar  Society — all  of  which  he  established ; 
they  are  now  in  a  prosperous  condition. 

Father  Melley  is  a  native  of  Schuylkill  county,  bom  at  Newkirk,  near 
Tamaqua,  in  1872.  His  parents,  Dennis  and  Anna  (Campbel^)  Melley,  were 
natives  of  County  Donegal,  Ireland,  and  they  came  to  this  country  in  1855, 
spending  the  rest  of  their  lives  in  Schuylkill  county,  Pa.  After  some  years' 
residence  at  Tamaqua  they  removed  to  Newkirk,  where  they  made  their  home 
for  thirty  years.  Returning  to  Tamaqua  Mr.  Melley  remained  there  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  on  Christmas  Day,  1895.  He  was  engaged  in  mining. 
He  was  a  most  respected  citizen  of  his  sec\ion,  and  was  repeatedly  elected 
school  director  in  Schuylkill  township,  holding  the  office  for  sixteen  years. 
His  widow  now  lives  with  a  daughter  at  Atlantic  City,  N.  J.  Of  the  four- 
teen children  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Dennis  Melley,  six  are  deceased.  Of  the 
eight  survivors.  Rose  is  a  graduate  nurse ;  Sister  Stanislaus  belongs  to  the  Order 
of  Notre  Dame;  EUzabeth,  wife  of  Edward  Smith,  and  Joseph  are  resi- 
dents of  Philadelphia;  the  remaining  members  of  the  family,  except  Father 
Melley,  reside  in  Atlantic  City. 

Dennis  J.  Melley  was  reared  in  Schuylkill  county,  attending  public  school 
in  Schuylkill  township.  His  higher  literary  education  was  received  at  LaSalle 
College,  Philadelphia,  and  Villanova  College,  and  in  1892  he  entered  Over- 
brook  Seminary  for  his  theological  preparation.  In  1902  he  received  ordina- 
tion, and  for  a  short  time  thereafter  was  at  Mount  Airy,  Pa.  Then  for  a 
year  he  was  stationed  at  Ashland,  Pa.,  as  assistant;  for  two  years  at  South 
Bethlehem,  Pa.;  at  St.  Peter's  Church,  Reading,  three  months,  and  for  five 
years  he  was  assistant  rector  of  St.  Patrick's,  at  Pottsville,  before  coming  to 
Tremont,  in  191 1.  Father  Melley  is  proving  a  worthy  successor  to  the  earn- 
est workers  who  have  preceded  him  at  St.  Mary's,  trying  to  keep  this  church, 
as  it  has  been  from  the  beginning,  among  the  potent  forces  for  good  in  the 
borough  and  vicinity. 

HENRY  CALVIN  KEHLER,  of  Locustdale,  is  a  representative  member 
of  a  family  which  has  been  foremost  in  the  development  and  progress  of  this 
portion  of  Schuylkill  county.  For  several  generations  the  Kehlers  have  had 
extensive  and  valuable  interests  in  farming  in  Eldred  township,  where  the 
town  of  Kehler  and  Kehler  Run  Junction  perpetuate  the  name,  and  at  present 
the  butchering  interests  which  constitute  by  far  the  greater  part  of  the  business 
wealth  of  Locustdale,  in  the  adjoining  township  of  Butler,  are  held  principally 
by  Kehlers,  the  brothers  H.  Calvin  and  Irvin  M.  Kehler  being  among  these. 
Their  father,  Franklin  Kehler,  was  a  drover  and  live  stock  dealer  for  over 
thirty-five  years. 

John  Kehler,  grandfather  of  Henry  Calvin  Kehler,  was  bom  in  what  is 
now  Eldred  (then  Mahantongo)  township,  in  Schuylkill  county,  of  German 
ancestry.  By  trade  he  was  a  tailor,  but  he  eventually  settled  down  to  farming 
and  was  one  of  the  prosperous  farmers  there  in  the  Mahantongo  valley  for 


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656  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

many  years.  In  the  pioneer  days  he  secured  a  large  tract  of  land  in  its  primi- 
tive state,  which  his  son  Peter  later  owned,  and  the  latter  in  turn  was  suc- 
ceeded by  his  son,  Felix  F.  Kehler.  It  was  covered  with  hardwood  timber, 
and  years  of  hard  labor  were  required  to  bring  it  into  arable  conditicwi.  John 
Kehler  first  cleared  a  spot  for  a  cabin,  and  before  the  ctose  of  his  life  made  a 
good  start  in  the  improvement  of  the  property,  though  the  early  results  were 
most  discouraging.  Thus  he  laid  the  foundation  for  the  success  of  those  who 
came  after  him,  and  also  continued  the  work  he  so  bravely  began  in  the  face 
of  hardships  and  trials  of  which  the  present  generation  knows  nothing  except 
what  the  account  handed  down  in  history.  John  Kehler  was  a  devout  Qiristian, 
an  earnest  member  of  the  Evangelical  Church.  His  home  was  the  stopping 
place  of  the  early  preachers  who  visited  the  region,  and  the  log  bam  he  erected 
was  used  for  religious  assemblages.  When  the  first  church  building  in  the  com- 
munity was  erected  he  assisted  with  the  work.  By  his  marriage  to  Elizabeth 
Hepler  he  had  eight  children,  five  sons  and  three  daughters. 

Franklin  Kehler,  son  of  John,  was  born  March  ii,  1829,  in  the  Mahan- 
tongo  valley,  and  died  at  Kehler  Nov.  9,  1904.  His  death  was  quite  sudden, 
for  although  he  had  reached  the  age  of  seventy-five  years  he  was  active  to  the 
last.  He  farmed,  and  kept  a  store  at  Kehler,  in  the  upper  Mahantongo  valley, 
but  his  operations  in  live  stock  were  his  most  important  interests.  In  the 
early  days  he  drove  cattle  from  Buffalo  to  Ashland,  this  county.  He  married 
Lydia  Snyder,  who  was  bom  Nov.  3,  1833,  in  the  Mahantongo  valley,  daugh- 
ter of  an  early  settler  in  that  region,  and  she  preceded  him  to  the  grave,  passing 
away  Jan.  i,  1898.  Of  the  eight  children  bom  to  them  two  died  in  infancy, 
six  surviving  the  parents,  namely :  Franklin  J.,  the  eldest,  is  deceased ;  Henry 
Calvin  is  mentioned  below ;  Charles  Robert  is  engaged  in  the  butcher  business 
at  Tremont,  this  county ;  Pmella  M.  is  the  wife  of  Henry  H.  Geist  and  they 
are  living  on  the  old  Kehler  homestead;  Johanna,  deceased,  was  the  wife  of 
Dr.  J.  D.  Kiefer,  of  Mount  Carmel,  Pa.;  Irvin  M.,  of  Locustdale,  is  in  the 
wholesale  and  retail  butcher  business.  The  father  was  a  prominent  member  of 
the  United  Evangelical  Church,  which  he  served  thirty-five  years  as  steward. 

Henry  Calvin  Kehler  was  bom  in  1856  in  the  Mahantongo  valley  and  was 
brought  up  there,  receiving  his  education  in  the  local  schools.  After  leaving 
school  for  a  time  he  went  West,  and  on  his  return  to  Pennsylvania  started 
business  with  his  brother  Frank  at  Locustdale.  Some  time  later  he  moved  to 
Centralia,  a  short  distance  over  the  line  in  Columbia  county,  where  he  was 
located  for  three  years,  at  the  end  of  that  period  coming  back  to  Locustdale, 
where  he  established  his  present  business  thirty-one  years  ago.  During  the 
intervening"  time  he  has  built  up  a  trade  of  large  proportions,  apparently  hav- 
ing the  gift  for  success  in  this  line  so  characteristic  of  the  family.  He  has  high 
qualifications  for  business,  combined  with  a  sense  of  fair  dealing  which  has 
made  him  recognized  as  entirely  trustworthy  in  any  transaction.  Practically 
all  his  attention  has  been  given  to  his  work,  his  principal  interest  aside  from 
that  being  his  church  association,  which  is  with  the  denomination  supported  by 
the  family  for  several  generations.  He  is  a  leading  member  of  the  United 
Evangelical  Church,  is  serving  on  its  board  of  trustees,  and  is  teacher  of  the 
Bible  class;  for  about  twenty-five  years  he  was  superintendent  or  assistant 
superintendent  of  the  Sunday  school. 

On  June  26,  1880,  Mr.  Kehler  was  married  at  Locustdale  to  Mary  A. 
Kepner,  who  was  born  Dec.  2,  1862,  a  native  of  Deep  Creek  valley,  where  her 
parents,  Emanuel  and  Matilda  (Updegraf)  Kepner,  were  early  settlers;  her 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  657 

father  was  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war.  They  died  in  Deep  Creek  valley  and 
are  buried  there.  They  had  a  large  family,  three  sons  and  eight  daughters, 
of  whom  John  T.  is  in  the  meat  business  at  Ashland ;  George  lives  at  Good- 
spring  station,  this  county;  Addie  is  the  wife  of  David  Jones,  of  St.  Clair,  a 
mine  foreman;  Katherine  is  the  widow  of  Elmer  Haslin;  Louisa  is  the  wife 
of  Paul  Kams,  of  Orwigsburg;  Flora  is  nKirried  to  Frank  Ganglof,  of 
Orwigsburg. 

Seven  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Kehler:  Victor  Frank, 
bom  Dec.  29,  1881,  now  a  butcher  at  Girardville,  this  county,  is  married  to 
Martha  Keller  and  has  two  children,  Roy  R.  and  Grace  A. ;  Pmella  M.,  bom 
May  6,  1883,  is  the  wife  of  Earl  Warther,  of  Locustdale,  and  has  one  child, 
George  Henry;  Lottie  P.,  bom  Nov.  6,  1886,  is  engaged  as  a  nurse  in  Phila- 
delpWa;  Harry  C,  bom  Feb.  23,  1889,  is  in  business  at  Philadelphia;  Winfield, 
bom  Aug.  30,  1890,  is  deceased;  Lydia  Matilda,  bom  March  23,  1892,  is  at 
home;  Robert  L.,  bora  July  6,  1895,  is  at  Girardville,  working  for  his  brother. 

HARRY  D.  LATTIMORE,  outside  foreman  and  master  mechanic  at  the 
Morea  colliery  in  Mahanoy  township,  operated  by  Weston  Dodson  &  Co.,  is  a 
mine  worker  of  long  and  varied  experience  and  well  fitted  for  the  important 
duties  which  have  been  intrusted  to  him.  Mr.  Lattimore  belongs  to  a  very  old 
Pennsylvania  family,  founded  in  this  country  in  1736  by  one  John  Lattimer,  as 
the  earlier  generations  spelled  the  name.  He  was  of  the  Scotch-Irish  race  which 
has  made  so  notable  a  contribution  to  the  best  citizenship  of  the  State.  He 
lived  in  Northampton  county,  acquired  high  reputation  for  his  strong  character 
and  integrity,  and  left  an  excellent  family  to  carry  on  his  name. 

Robert  Lattimore,  son  of  John,  married  Nancy  King,  and  among  their 
children  was  William  Lattimore,  better  known  as  General  Lattimore,  who  was 
elected  to  the  State  Senate  from  Northampton  county  in  1805,  his  district  in- 
cluding Wayne,  Luzeme  and  Northampton  counties.  He  was  bom  in  what  is 
known  as  the  Irish  settlement  in  Northampton  county,  and  lived  and  died  there. 
His  wife,  Mary  (Ralston),  was  the  daughter  of  John  and  Christiana  (King) 
Ralston,  the  former  of  whom  took  an  active  part  m  the  Revolutionary  war. 

James  Lattimore,  son  of  Gen.  William  Lattimore,  was  for  many  years 
connected  with  the  government  land  offices  located  at  the  cities  of  Lancaster 
and  Harrisburg,  Pa.  '  He  married  Catherine  Weaver,  daughter  of  Michael 
Weaver,  of  Weaversville,  Northampton  county,  a  prominent  farmer  and  lead- 
ing member  of  the  Lutheran  Church.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lattimore  had  the  fol- 
lowing children :  William  W. ;  Ralston,  who  died  in  infancy ;  May,  who  died 
in  1902,  unmarried;  Alvida  C,  who  married  James  Abbott;  John,  who  mar- 
ried Nancy  Chase;  Lenora  N.  S.,  who  married  Herman  B.  Graeff;  and  Amelia 
D.,  Mrs.  E.  W.  Abbott. 

William  W.  Lattimore  was  bom  in  1820,  and  died  in  1889:  He  is  buried 
at  Tamaqua,  this  county.  The  last  twenty  years  of  his  life  were  spent  at  New 
Boston,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  settled  in  1869  and  worked  for  the  coal 
company  until  his  death.  He  took  a  keen  interest  in  local  affairs,  serving  s^ 
president  of  the  Mahanoy  township  school  board,  was  a  Presbyterian  in 
religious  connection,  and  a  member  of  the  Masonic  fratemity.  He  married 
Pauh'ne  L.  Dithmar,  of  Northampton  county,  daughter  of  Henri  (Hein)  Jaques 
Dithmar,  a  native  of  France  and  of  Huguenot  ancestry.  She  still  makes  her 
home  at  New  Boston.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lattimore  were  bom  the  following 
children:  Caroline  A.  is  the  widow  of  Dr.  Alonzo  Amerman,  who  died  at 
VoLH— 4 


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658  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Danville,  Pa.,  Jan.  19,  1886  (they  had  one  son,  Alonzo,  who  died  in  1912,  at 
the  age  of  twenty-seven  years)  ;  William  A.  holds  a  position  with  the  Coal 
Company  at  New  Boston;  Harry  D.  is  next  in  the  family;  Walter  A.,  of  Nor- 
ristown,  Pa.,  married  Nettie  Richardson  and  has  one  daughter,  Joan ;  Arthur 
R.  married  Loretta  Cooney,  of  Canada,  and  has  one  son,  Arthur  William; 
Catherine  W.,  unmarried,  lives  at  home;  Elizabeth  D.  is  unmarried  and  living 
at  home;  Pauline  S.  is  the  wife  of  William  Douden,  of  Millersburg,  Pa.,  and 
has  three  children,  William  L.,  Herbert  C.  and  Dorothy. 

Harry  D.  Lattimore  was  bom  Nov.  14,  1861,  at  Tamaqua,  Schuylkill  Co., 
Pa.  Coming  to  New  Boston  with  his  parents  in  1S69,  he  received  his  educa- 
tion principally  in  the  schools  of  Mahanoy  township.  In  1872  he  started 
work  as  a  clerk  in  Mahanoy  City.  Later  he  was  in  the  employ  of  the  Mill 
Creek  Coal  Company  for  twi>  years,  after  which  he  clerked  again  for  a  short 
time.  When  fifteen  years  old  he  went  back  to  school,  attending  for  five  months, 
during  which  period  he  was  under  the  capable  instruction  of  the  late  John  J. 
Dolphin,  Esq.  He  then  taught  school  for  one  term,  clerked  in  a  store  at 
Mahanpy  City  for  one  year,  loaded  coal  at  the  New  Boston  colliery  for  one 
winter,  and  for  two  years  was  engaged  in  running  a  mine  fan  engine  -and 
hoisting,  until  December,  1886,  when  he  was  apypointed  outside  foreman,  serv- 
ing in  that  capacity  up  to  1889  at  the  New  Boston  colliery,  following  which  he 
was  engaged  in  public  work,  the  driving  of  the  Jeddo  tunnel.  His  next  posi- 
tion was  that  of  master  mechanic  at  the  Buck  Mountain  and  Vulcan  collieries, 
operated  by  the  Mill  Creek  Coal  Company,  with  whom  he  continued  until  1909, 
when  those  collieries  became  the  property  of  the  Lehigh  Valley  Coal  Company, 
with  whom  he  remained  as  master  mechanic  until  191 1.  His  skill  and  readiness 
in  emergencies  made  him  a  valuable  factor  in  the  operations  at  the  mammoth 
Buck  Mountain  breaker.  In  February,  191 1,  Mr.  Lattimore  became  outside 
foreman  and  master  mechanic  at  the  Morea  colliery  in  Mahanoy  township, 
carried  on  by  Weston  Dodson  &  Co.,  who  employ  about  five  hundred  men  at 
these  workings,  and  here  he  has  remained  to  the  present.  A  man  of  dependable 
qualities,  thoroughly  conversant  with  all  the  details  of  his  work,  trustworthy 
in  all  things  and  of  upright  character,  he  has  exerted  an  appreciable  influence 
in  the  successful  conduct  of  the  colliery  and  in  maintaining  satisfactory  con- 
ditions among  its  employees.    Most  of  this  is  due  to  his  strong  personality. 

Mr.  Lattimore  married  Ann  D.  Hay,  daughter  of  Robert  and  Ann  (Douth- 
waite)  Hay.  They  have  two  children,  Harry  D.,  Jr.,  and  Robert,  the  former 
now  associated  with  his  father  as  chief  machinist  for  the  Dodson  Coal  Com- 
pany at  the  Morea  colliery ;  from  1905  to  1907  he  served  an  apprenticeship  in 
the  Baldwin  Locomotive  Works,  Philadelphia,  and  in  1910  associated  himself 
with  the  Midvale  steel  works,  first  in  the  engineering  department  and  later 
in  the  estimation  department,  and  in  191 1  took  his  present  position.  Robert 
Lattimore  is  engineer  in  charge  of  the  pumping  station  at  Morea  colliery. 

The  family  are  Presbyterians  in  religious  association.  Socially  Mr.  Latti- 
more belongs  to  Mahanoy  City  Lodge,  No.  357,  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  to  Mahanoy 
City  Lodge,  No.  695,  B.  P.  O.  Elks,  and  is  highly  esteemed  among  his  fellow 
members.    His  eldest  son  also  holds  membership  in  these  lodges. 

WILLIAM  IVY  BACHERT,  farmer  and  fpuit  grower  of  Walker  town- 
ship, is  operating  a  modem  farm  noted  especially  for  its  fine  orchard^,  to 
whose  development  and  maintenance  he  devotes  most  of  his  energies.  Mr. 
Bachert  is  a  representative  citizen  of  his  section  of  Schuylkill  county,  and  a 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  659 

member  of  one  of  its  old  families,  the  Bacherts  having  been  settled  in  East 
Brunswick  township  for  several  generations.  There  he  was  bom  July  25, 
1869,  son  of  Elias  Bachert,  now  a  prominent  farmer  and  miller  of  East 
Brunswick  township. 

George  Bachert,  the  great-grandfather  of  William  I.  Bachert,  was  a  farmer 
in  East  Brunswick  township,  where  he  owned  100  acres  of  land,  upon  which 
he  erected  a  log  bam  and  stone  house.  He  was  a  wheelwright  as  well  as 
farmer.  He  had  the  following  children:  Jacob,  John,  Henry,  Simon,  Mag- 
dalena  and  Mrs.  John  Faust.  George  Bachert  died  aged  eighty  years,  and  is 
buried  with  his  wife  in  a  private  graveyard  on  the  homestead  farm.  He  was 
a  Democrat,  and  a  member  of  the  Frieden's  German  Lutheran  Church. 

John  Bachert,  father  of  Elias,  was  reared  and  educated  in  East  Brunswick 
township,  and  during  his  youth  assisted  his  father.  Later  he  bought  a  farm 
of  100  acres  near  the  old  homestead,  and  carried  on  farming  all  his  life. 
Politically  he  was  a  Democrat,  and  in  religion  a  Lutheran,  he  and  his  wife 
belonging  to  the  Frieden's  Church;  they  are  buried  in  its  cemetery.  Mr. 
Bachert  married  Elizabeth  Zettlemoyer,  who  was  bom  in  Berks  county,  Pa., 
and  the  following  children  were  born  to  this  union:  Jacob  married  Sarah 
Miller  and  both  are  deceased;  Emmanuel  died  unmarried;  James,  deceased, 
married  Flora  Steigerwalt,  who  resides  in  West  Bmnswick  township,  this 
county;  Daniel  died  young;  Elias  is  next  in  the  family;  Elizabeth  married 
Jacob  Houser,  and  both  are  deceased;  Laura  married  Aaron  Eckroth;  Mollie 
died  unmarried;  Katie  died  young.  The  father  of  this  family  lived  to  the 
age  of  eighty  years,  the  mother  dying  at  the  age  of  sixty-eight. 

Elias  Bachert,  son  of  John,  was  born  Aug.  14,  1843,  in  East  Brunswick 
township,  where  he  now  owns  and  operates  a  valuable  farm  and  mill  property. 
He  married  Hannah  Merkle,  and  they  have  had  a  large  family,  namely: 
Albert  Robert,  William  Ivy,  Elizabeth  (deceased  in  infancy),  Cordelia,  John 
E.,  Richard  E.,  Howard  J.,  Luther  P.,  Thomas  W.  and  Oscar  P.  A  fuller 
account  of  this  family  appears  in  the  biography  of  Elias  Bachert. 

William  Ivy  Bachert  grew  up  in  East  Brunswick  township  and  there  ob- 
tained a  good  common  school  education.  His  business  and  agricultural  train- 
ing were  highly  practical,  gained  in  assisting  his  father  with  the  farm  and 
mUl  work,  and  he  continued  thus  until  he  reached  the  age  of  thirty  years. 
Then  he  settled  on  his  present  property  in  Walker  township,  having  bought 
the  Dennis  Leiby  farm  of  fifty-three  acres.  Four  acres  are  still  in  timber, 
the  rest  under  cultivation,  partly  planted  in  fine  orchards,  the  balance  in  gen- 
eral crops.  Mr.  Bachert  has  made  fruit  growing  his  particular  care,  and 
counts  on  his  orchard  products  for  most  of  his  income,  marketing  them  prin- 
cipally at  Tuscarora  and  New  Philadelphia,  to  which  points  he  makes  two  or 
three  trip>s  weekly  during  the  season.  He  has  identified  himself  with  the  vari- 
ous local  movements  for  the  improvement  of  farms  and  farming  conditions, 
and  is  an  interested  worker  in  the  Patrons  of  Husbandry,  being  a  fourth 
degree  member  of  the  Lewistown  Grange.  Beyond  this,  however,  he  has 
taken  little  part  in  public  matters,  though  he  supports  good  movements  when- 
ever he  has  the  opportunity.  He  is  a  Democrat  and  a  Lutheran,  being  a 
member  and  deacon  of  Zion's  Church  at  Lewistown,  Walker  township. 

When  twenty-eight  years  old  Mr.  Bachert  married  Carrie  Edith  Leiby, 
who  was  bom  Oct.  9,  1879,  5"  Walker  township,  daughter  of  Dennis  Leiby, 
received  her  education  in  the  local  schools  there,  and  remained  at  home  until 
her  marriage.     She  is  a  member  of  the  Reformed  congregation  of  Zion*s 


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660  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Church,  at  Lewistown.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bachert  have  had  eight  children,  bom 
as  follows:  William  Dennis,  June  27,  1898;  Clarence  Harvey,  Dec.  10,  1899; 
Mamie  Victoria,  June  17,  1902  (died  aged  two  years,  eight  months)  ;  Harry 
Edwin,  Feb.  13,  1903;  Vema  Elizabeth,  Sept.  12,  1905;  Beulah  May,  Feb.  17, 
1909;  Leon  Stanley,  Sept  15,  191 1 ;  Elva  Margarite,  June  9,  1913. 

Daniel  Leiby,  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Bachert,  was  bom  in  West  Penn  town- 
ship, this  county,  and  was  a  shoemaker  and  a  farmer.  He  was  the  owner  of 
two  farms  in  West  Penn  township,  and  later  came  to  Walker  township,  where 
he  bought  a  farm  of  over  one  hundred  acres,  much  of  which  he  cleared,  hav- 
ing about  eighty  acres  under  cultivation.  There  he  built  a  fine  bam  and 
made  other  improvements.  He  died  on  the  farm  at  the  advanced  age  of  almost 
eighty  years.  His'wife's  maiden  name  was  Steigerwalt,  and  they  had  children 
as  follows:  Dennis,  father  of  Mrs.  Bachert;  Sarah,  Mrs.  John  Schaller; 
Emma,  Mrs.  Adolph  Bemer;  Amanda,  Mrs.  Mandus  Hunsicker;  Mary,  Mrs. 
Thomas  Schock;  Jonathan,  who  married  Sarah  Reinhart;  Daniel,  who  mar- 
ried Flora  Miller;  Israel,  who  married  Lizzie  Reiman;  Alvena,  unmarried; 
Elias  (his  wife  was  Mamie)  ;  and  Susanna,  who  died  in  childhood.  The  par- 
ents are  buried  in  the  cemetery  of  Zion's  Reformed  Church  in  West  Penn 
township,  to  which  church  they  belonged.  Mr.  Leiby  was  a  Republican  in 
politics. 

Dennis  Leiby  was  bom  in  West  Penn  township,  Schuylkill  county,  July 
25,  1845,  ^^^  grew  up  there  and  in  Walker  township,  receiving  his  education 
in  the  public  schools  of  those  townships.  He  worked  for  his  father  imtil 
he  was  of  age,  later  was  stable  boss  at  Reevesdale  for  a  mining  company,  hold- 
ing that  position  two  years,  and  then  settled  down  to  farming  on  his  own 
account  in  Walker  township,  buying  land  which  is  the  farm  his  son-in-law,  Mr. 
Bachert,  now  owns.  He  carried  on  general  farming  there  until  1906,  when 
he  sold  the  farm  to  Mr.  Bachert,  and  is  now  living  retired  practically.  Mr. 
Leiby  has  always  taken  a  1/eading  part  in  township  affairs,  having  held  the 
offices  of  school  director,  constable,  supervisor  and  auditor,  to  the  entire  satis- 
faction of  his  fellow  citizens.  Like  his  father  he  is  a  Republican  and  a  member 
of  the  Reformed  Church,  belonging  to  the  Zion's  congregation  at  Lewistown, 
in  which  he  was  formerly  very  active.  Socially  he  holds  membership  in 
Washington  Camp  No.  57,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  at  Tamaqua. 

Mr.  Leiby  married  Emmaline  Yost,  daughter  of  Samuel  and  Elizabeth 
(Merkle)  Yost,  and  four  children  were  bom  to  them,  viz.:  Carrie  Edith, 
Mrs.  William  I.  Bachert ;  Gertrude  May,  who  is  married  to  George  Schietman 
and  resides  at  Tamaqua,  Pa.;  Harry  Preston,  who  died  aged  twenty- four 
years ;  and  Mamie  Elizabeth,  who  is  married  to  Milton  Merkle,  and  resides  at 
Lewistown,  Walker  township. 

Mrs.  Emmaline  (Yost)  Leiby  was  bom  near  Frisbie,  in  West  Brunswick 
township,  Schuylkill  county,  and  died  at  the^age  of  fifty-three  years.  She  is 
buried  at  Lewistown,  in  Walker  township.'  Mrs.  Leiby  was  a  member  of 
Christ  Church  at  McKeansburg,  but  after  her  marriage  to  Dennis  Leiby  con- 
nected herself  with  Zion's  Reformed  Church  at  Lewistown,  and  was  a  member 
there  until  her  death. 

Samuel  Yost,  the  matemal  grandfather  of  Mrs.  William  I.  Bachert,  was 
a  farmer  in  West  Bmnswick  township,  the  owner  of  a  large  tract  of  land,  and 
also  conducted  a  hotel  for  many  years.  He  married  Elizabeth  Merkle,  and 
they  became  the  parents  of  a  large  family:  Kitty  married  Charles  Lurwick, 
and  both  are  deceased ;  Eliza  married  Harry  Gerhard ;  Caroline  is  the  widow 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  661 

of  John  Shutt;  Sarah,  deceased,  married  William  Bretz;  Susanna  is  the 
widow  of  William  Leiser;  Mary  died  unmarried;  Emmaline  was  Mrs.  Dennis 
Leiby;  Phoebe,  deceased,  married  a  Mr.  Nagle;  Samuel  married  Sarah  Ger- 
hard; Frank  married  Kitty ;  Lewis  completes  the  family.  The  par- 
ents died  on  the  farm  and  are  buried  at  McKeansburg.  Mr.  Yost  was  a 
member  of  Christ  Reformed  Church  at  that  place  and  a  Republican  in  political 
conviction. 

WALTER  E.  UPDEGROVE,  who  is  engaged  in  business  as  a  shoe  mer- 
chant at  Muir,  Schuylkill  county,  was  bom  Nov.  28,  1875,  at  Orwin,  Porter 
township,  Schuylkill  county,  son  of  Theodore  G.  and  Catherine  (Shadle) 
Updegix>ve,  grandson  of  Solomon  Updegrove  and  great-grandson  of  Conrad 
Updegrove.  ^  ^__ 

Conrad  Updegrove,  who  was  one  of  the  earhest  and  best  known  among  the 
pioneers  of  the  Williams  Valley,  in  Dauphin  county.  Pa.,  was  a  great  hunter, 
and  many  stories  are  still  told  of  his  skill  and  prowess  in  this  direction.  Dur- 
ing the  days  when  game  of  all  kinds  was  plentiful,  he  had  many  experiences^ 
with  bears,  and  at  one  time  would  have  been  killed  by  one  of  these  beasts  had 
it  not  been  for  his  faithful  dogs.  As  it  was  he  bore  the  marks  of  this 
encounter  up  to  the  day  of  his  death.  He  was  one  of  the  sturdy,  energetic, 
industrious  men  of  his  day  who  laid  broad  and  deep  the  foundation  for  ad- 
vancement and  progress,  and  lived  a  long,  active  and  useful  life,  passing  away 
at  the  advanced  age  of  ninety-four  years,  three  months,  fifteen  days.  His 
home  at  that  time  was  on  the  present  site  of  Williamstown,  Dauphin  county. 

Solomon  Updegrove,  the  grandfather  of  Walter  E.  Updegrove,  was  bom., 
in  Dauphin  county,  Pa.,  and  early  adopted  the  trade  of  shoemaker,  which  he 
followed  off  and  on  during  the  greater  part  of  his  life,  although  he  also 
engaged  in  other  occupations.  He  was  a  local  preacher  of  the  Evangelical 
Church,  and  for  some  years  was  engaged  in  farming  in  Dauphin  county,  but 
in  later  life  disposed  of  his  property  and  moved  to  a  farm  in  Juniata  county, 
remaining  there  until  he  retired  from  active  work.  He  then  sold  his  farm 
and  went  to  live  at  the  home  of  his  daughter,  Mrs.  William  Long,  at  ForkSy 
Porter  township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  died  at  the  age  of  sevent)it-five 
years.  He  was  laid  to  rest  in  the  cemetery  at  Williamstown.  Mr.  Upde- 
grove was  a  man  highly  esteemed  in  the  various  communities  in  which  he 
resided,  being  possessed  of  those  sterling  qualities  which  command  respect. 
He  married  Barbara  Rickert,  who  died  at  Williamstown,  Pa.,  and  they  became 
the  parents  of  the  following  children:  John;  Jacob;  Conrad;  Solomon,  who 
fought  in  a  Pennsylvania  regiment  of  volunteers  during  the  Civil  war; 
Oiarles;  Theodore  G. ;  Catherine,  who  married  Israel  Helt;  Elizabeth,  who 
married  Edward  Hand;  Elmira,  who  married  John  Hockenbrocht ;  Lucetta, 
who  married  Isaac  Dressier;  Sarah,  who  married  Isaac  Brooker;  and  Mary, 
who  married  William  Long._ 

Theodore  G.  Updegrove,  the  father  of  Walter  E.  Updegrove,  was  bom  at 
Williamstown,  Dauphin  Co.,  Pa.,  and  after  attaining  an  ordinary  educational 
training  in  the  public  schools  started  to  learn  the  trade  of  shoemaker  under  the 
instmction  of  his  father.  After  mastering  his  vocation,  he  followed  it  in 
Juniata  and  Columbia  counties,  and  at  Tower  City,  Schuylkill  county,  and 
later  came  to  the  community  of  Reiner  City  (Muir  P.  O.),  where  he  began  to 
build  up  a  trade.  Here,  as  he  prospered,  he  built  a  residence  and  store,  in 
which  latter  he  established  his  place  of  business  as  a  dealer  in  boots  and  shoes, 


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662  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

and  continue<J  to  be  successfully  engaged  in  this  line  right  up  to  the  time  of 
his  death,  which  occurred  in  1899.  He  had  inherited  the  qualities  of  industry, 
honesty  and  fidelity  from  his  forebears,  and  in  all  his  business  dealings  was 
known  to  be  above-board  and  straightforward.  He  was  a  good  and  public- 
spirited  citizen,  who  took  an  interest  in  the  advancement  of  his  community 
and  who  could  be  counted  upon  to  serve  it  in  any  way  he  was  able.  Mr. 
Updegrove  was  buried  in  the  cemetery  at  Muir.  He  married  Catherine 
Shadle,  a  daughter  of  George  and  Maria  (Guard)  Shadle.  George  Shadle 
was  a  resident  of  Porter  township,  where  he  was  stable  boss  for  the  Lincoln 
colliery,  and  met  his  death  by  being  killed  by  a  train  while  in  the  performance 
of  his  duty.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Updegrove  became  the  parents  of  the  following 
children :  Walter  E. ;  Charles  Howard ;  Henry  O.,  who  is  deceased ;  Ella  M., 
who  is  the  wife  of  Prof.  H.  O.  Unger,  a  teslcher  in  the  public  schools  of  Muir; 
Laura  A.,  who  is  the  wife  of  Prof.  George  D.  Nelson,  a  teacher  in  the  public 
schools  of  Orwin ;  and  Theodore  G.  Jr.,  who  reside3  at  Muir. 

Walter  E.  Updegrove  secured  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Porter 
township,  which  he  attended  when  not  engaged  in  working  to  aid  in  his  own 
support.  An  evidence  of  his  thrift  and  industry  as  a  lad  is  found  in  the  fact 
that  from  the  time  he  was  nine  until  he  was  sixteen  years  of  age  he,  assisted 
by  his  brothers  and  sisters,  carried  the  mail  from  Orwin  to  the  people  of 
Reiner  City,  this  being  before  the  establishment  of  the  post  office  at  Muir. 
He  also  gave  his  services  to  the  farmers  of  his  community  and  worked  at  the 
shoemaking  trade,  accepting  whatever  honorable  employment  came  his  way 
and  performing  all  his  tasks  in  an  able,  thorough  and  cheerful  manner.  When 
he  was  eighteen  years  of  age  he  began  teaching  in  the  public  schools  of  Porter 
township,  and  for  twelve  years  continued  to  be  engaged  in  work  as  an  educator. 
At  the  time  of  his  father's  death,  Mr.  Updegrove  took  over  the  management 
of  the  business,  which  he  conducted  for  his  mother  for  seven  years,  buying 
it  on  July  5,  1906,  since  when  he  has  continued  to  carry  it  on  with  much  suc- 
cess. He  has  a  carefully  selected  stock  of  the  latest  footwear,  and  is  enjoy- 
ing an  excellent  patronage  among  the  people  among  whom  he  has  lived  for  so 
longi  and  whose  wishes  and  needs  he  well  knows. 

Mr.  Updegrove  was  married  to  Nora  M.  Gamber,  daughter  of  Henry 
Gamber,  who  resided  in  Clark's  Valley,  Porter  township.  To  this  union  there 
have  been  born  the  following  children:  Prof.  Harry  H.,  a  graduate  of  the 
Keystone  State  Normal  School,  Kutztown,  Pa.,  class  of  191 5,  and  now  teach- 
ing at  Reinerton,  Schuylkill  county;  Elsie  M.,  a  member  of  the  class  of  1916, 
of  the  Porter  township  high  school;  Esther  M.,  who  is  attending  the  Porter 
township  high  school ;  T.  Walter,  who  is  attending  school ;  and  James  Arthur 
and  Norman  Henry,  at  home. 

Always. a  friend  of  education,  Mr.  Updegrove  has  long  been  well  and 
favorably  known  in  educational  circles  in  this  part  of  the  State.  During  the 
last  four  years  he  has  been  secretary  of  the  School  Directors'  Association 
of  Schuylkill  county,  and  from  the  time  he  ceased  teaching  school  has  been  a 
member  of  the  school  board  of  Porter  township,  having  served  as  president 
thereof  and  now  being  secretary  of  that  body.  Outside  of  his  shoe  business 
he  has  other  interests,  and  for  three  years  has  been  secretary  of  the  Williams 
Valley  Savings  Fund  and  Building  Association.  Fraternally,  he  belongs  to  the 
Patriotic  Order  Sons  of  America,  which  he  joined  twenty-four  years  ago,  and 
the  Junior  Order  United  American  Mechanics,  of  which  he  became  a  mem- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  663 

ber  sixteen  years  ago,  and  also  holds  membership  in  the  local  lodge  of  the 
Knights  of  Pythias.    His  good  citizenship  has  never  been  doubted. 

SAMUEL  J.  DEIBERT,  deputy  prothonotary  of  Schuylkill  county,  Pa., 
has  been  engaged  at  the  courthouse  for  the  last  twenty  years,  in  various  capac- 
ities, and  his  obliging  service  and  long  continuance  in  public  positions  have 
made  him  a  popular  as  well  as  familiar  figure  in  the  official  circles  of  Potts- 
ville.  He  was  bom  March  31,  1858,  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  this  county,  where 
he  maintaips  his  home. , 

Samuel  Deibert,  father  of  Samuel  J.  Deibert,  was  the  son  of  John  and 
Christina  Deibert,  and  was  reared  on  his  father's  farm  in  North  Manheim 
township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  He  had  such  schooling  as  is  common  to  the 
average  country  boy.  He  was  bom  in  the  year  1818,  and  remained  beneath  the 
parental  roof  up  to  the  age  of  twenty-five,  when  he  engaged  with  his  brothers 
John  and  Jacob  at  Schuylkill  Haven  in  boatbuilding.  After  a  brief  period 
in  that  line  he  embarked  in  the  mercantile  business  at  the  same  place,  which 
he  successfully  conducted  until  the  time  of  his  death,  in  1867.  To  his  first  mar- 
riage, with  Mary  Essert,  were  bom  one  son,  Thomas,  and  one  daughter, 
Emma,  who  became  the  wife  of  Martin  Fisher.  No  heirs  came  of  this  alliance. 
His  second  wife  was  Mary  A.  Sterner,  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Anna  Stemer, 
and  to  this  union  were  born  three  children,  viz. :  Alice,  Thomas  I.  and  Sam- 
uel J.  It  may  be  justly  recorded  that  Samuel  Deibert  was  a  most  modest 
man,  and  though  prominent  in  business  and  benefactions  shrunk  from  eulogy 
and  praise,  but  he  was  a  man  revered,  and  one  whose  place  cannot  well  be 
filled.    In  religious  affiliation  he  was  a  Lutheran. 

Samuel  J.  Deibert  obtained  a  public  school  education  at  Schuylkill  Haven, 
and  learned  the  carpenter's  trade,  which  he  followed  for  about  twenty  years. 
During  Dr.  Daniel  Dechert's  term  as  county  treasurer  he  came  as  a  clerk  to 
his  office,  serving  there  one  year.  After  that  he  became  deputy  treasurer 
under  Elias  Davis,  holding  that  position  for  a  period  of  almost  three  years, 
until  the  death  of  Mr.  Davis,  which  occurred  Nov.  11,  1899.  The  county 
commissioners  appointed  Mr.  Deibert  treasurer  for  the  unexpired  term,  and 
he  discharged  the  duties  of  the  office  for  six  weeks.  In  August,  1900,  he 
became  deputy  prothonotary  under  W.  S.  Leib,  and  served  to  the  end  of  his 
term,  subsequently  serving  six  years  in  the  same  capacity  under  Samuel  H. 
Gore,  and  continuing  under  his  successor,  the  present  prothonotary,  John  W. 
Reese.  Up  to  now  he  has  been  in  the  public  service  for  twenty  years.  His 
courtesy  and  efficiency  have  combined  to  make  him  a  most  desirable  official 
in  the  office  and  sought  by  those  who  have  business  there,  his  work  being 
greatly  appreciated  by  all  who  have  had  occasion  to  call  for  his  services.  His 
political  association  is  with  the  Republican  party.  Mr.  Deibert  makes  his 
home  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  at  one  time  served  as  assessor  of  that  borough. 

Mr.  Deibert  married  Lavina  Bitzer,  daughter  of  Conrad  and  Anna  Bitzer. 
and  they  have  had  four  children,  namely:  Alice,  Ralph,  Samuel  and  Willis. 
Alice  is  the  wife  of  Rev.  William  Schlappich,  of  the  Evangelical  denomination, 
now  stationed  at  Perkasie.  Pa.  Ralph  Deibert  received  his  early  education 
in  the  schools  of  Schuylkill  Haven  and  Pottsville,  later  attending  Franklin 
?nd  Marshall  College,  at  Lancaster,  Pa.,  and  entering  the  ministry  of  the 
F.vangelical  denomination;  he  is  now  pastor  of  a  church  at  Myerstown,  Pa. 
Samuel,  who  is  at  home,  is  an  assistant  in  the  Schuylkill  Haven  Tmst  Com- 


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664  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

pany.    Willis,  also  at  home,  is  bookkeeper  or  clerk  at  the  Schuylkill  County 
Hospital  for  the  Insane. 

A,  FRANK  GEIST,  of  Hegins,  is  a  business  man  who  has  attained  honor- 
able standing  by  giving  his  patrons  the  best  accommodations  to  be  obtained 
in  the  local  market,  and  he  is  equally  esteemed  for  his  worth  as  a  man. 

The  Geist  family  to  which  he  belongs  is  of  pioneer  stock  of  Northumber- 
land county,  this  State,  where  he  and  his  father  were  bom.  His  grandfather, 
Peter  Geist,  lived  and  died  there,  following  his  trade  of  blacksmith  and  also 
engaging  in  farming.  The  history  of  the  family  has  been  lately  traced  .back 
to  the  year  1129.  From  the  Official  Register  of  the  Holy  Roman  Empire,  we 
find  that  the  family  has  an  official  "Coat  of  Arms"  and  is  of  the  nobility  of 
Ravensburg,  CJermany.  A  copy  of  this  "Coat  of  Arms"  is  in  the  hands  of  A. 
F.  Geist,  of  Hegins,  Pennsylvania.  The  word  Geist  has  been  spelled  in  six 
different  ways.  We  find  it  first  Gayst — ^Van  Wildeneck,  A.  D.  1129,  King. 
In  1300  we  find  it  spelled  Geyst,  in  1590  Geist,  in  1750  Goist  in  Germany, 
and  in  the  Colonies  of  America  Geist  and  Gist.  In  1^2  and  to  the  present 
time  it  is  spelled  Guist  in  Germany  and  in  the  United  States  Guist  and  Geist. 

The  family  to  which  A.  F.  Geist  belongs  and  whose  biography  appears 
later,  emigrated  from  Lorraine,  Germany,  with  the  Schwenkf elders'  colony 
in  or  about  the  year  1725  and  settled  at  Pottstown,  Montg^omery  Co.,  Pa., 
where  A.  F.  Geist's  great-grandfather,  Andrew  Geist,  was  bom  on  Jan.  26, 
1755.  This  great-grandfather  of  A.  F.  Geist  came  to  what  was  then  and  is 
yet  known  by  some  people  as  Swoven  Creek  or  Green  Brier  post  office,  Nor- 
thumberland Co.,  Pa.,  in  or  about  the  year  1777.  He  came  to  this  place  in  his 
young  manhood  and  took  up  a  tract  of  land  from  the  United  States  govern- 
ment about  the  time  of  the  Revolutionary  war,  consisting  of  about  three  hundred 
acres  situated  half  way  between  the  Leek  Kill  and  Green  Brier  post  offices. 
He  died  Dec.  18,  1849,  ^^  ^he  age  of  ninety-four  years,  ten  months,  twenty-three 
days,  on  the  old  homestead  which  6e  obtained  from  the  United  States  govern- 
ment, and  is  buried  at  Himmel's  Church,  Roebuck's  post  office,  or  about  four 
miles  west  from  the  old  homestead.  This  church  property  consists  of  a  beauti- 
ful church  situated  on  a  tract  of  land  given  by  the  United  States  government 
to  the  Reformed  and  Lutheran  congregations  for  church  and  school  purposes ; 
said  property  is  today  under  the  control  of  these  congregations  and  in  its  ceme- 
tery are  buried  some  soldiers  who  fought  in  the  Revolutionary  war. 

While  great-grandfather  Andrew  Geist  was  working  on  this  homestead  in 
Swoven  Creek,  he  had  but'one  cow  on  these  three  hundred  acres  of  land,  and 
this  cow  had  no  tail.  During  this  period  the  Revolutionary  war  was  in 
progress  and  Andrew  was  drafted  to  serve  in  this  great  war  for  freedom,  and 
not  desiring  to  serve  he  sold  this  tailless  cow  in  order  to  raise  money  to  buy  a 
substitute  to  serve  in  his  place.  It  was  during  this  time,  from  the  landing  of 
the  Schwenkfelders'  colony  to  the  close  of  the  Revolutionary  war,  that  the 
word  Geist  was  spelled  Gist,  appearing  this  way  on  official  records  and  papers 
examined  by  R.  P.  Geist,  justice  of  the  peace.  Green  Brier,  Northumberland 
Co.,  Pa.,  191 5. 

On  the  homestead  of  Andrew  Geist,  the  grandfather  of  A.  F.  Geist,  Peter 
Geist,  was  bom  Dec.  21,  1804,  and  died  at  this  place  on  Jan.  8,  1875,  aged 
seventy  years,  eighteen  days.  He  is  buried  at  St.  John's  Reformed  and 
Lutheran  Church,  Leek  Kill,  Pa.  In  his  boyhood  days  Peter  left  the  old  home- 
stead and  went  to  Washingtonville,  Montour  Co.,  Pa.    There  he  learned  his 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  665 

trade,  that  of  blacksmith.  He  also  married  at  this  place  and  soon  after  moved 
back  onto  the  old  homestead  in  Swoven  Creek,  where  he  continued  at  his  trade 
and  did  farming.    Here  Jacob,  the  father  of  A.  F.  Geist,  was  bom  Feb.  ii,  1835. 

Jacob  Geist,  father  of  A.  Frank  Geist,  learned  the  trade  of  carpenter  in 
his  youth  and  followed  that  calling  all  his  life.  In  1881  he  came  to  Hegins, 
Schuylkill  county,  where  he  continued  work  at  his  trade  and  resided  to  the 
end  of  his  days,  dying  in  the  year  1898.  His  widow,  whose  maiden  name  was 
Catherine  Schwartz,  still  lives  in  Hegins  township,  near  Hegins,  on  the  Geist 
home  place.  She  was  bom  in  Hegins  township,  Schuylkill  county,  where  her 
father,  Abraham  Schwartz,  engaged  in  farming  and  made  his  home  until  his 
death.  Eight  children  were  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Jacob  Geist,  four  sons  and 
four  daughters,  namely :  Ellen  is  the  widow  of  Samuel  E.  Schwalm  and  lives  in 
H^ns  township,  at  what  was  known  as  Kessler's  gristmill ;  S.  Calvin  resides 
at  Hegins ;  Elizabeth  is  the  wife  of  S.  R.  Masser,  who  has  a  general  store  at 
Hegins;  Cora  is  married  to  A.  C.  Kessler,  a  farmer  of  Hegins  township;  Katie 
is  married  to  Harry  Leonard,  of  Tremont,  Schuylkill  county,  baggagemaster 
in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  XTompany ;  A.  Frank  is 
next  in  order  of  birth ;  Thomas  J.  is  a  graduate  of  the  Franklin  and  Marshall 
CoU^^,  Lancaster,  Pa.,  and  now  engaged  as  a  teacher  at  Ephrata,  Lancaster 
Co.,  Pa. ;  Nathan  Francis  is  doing  a  general  hauling  and  teaming  business  at 
Hegins,  where  he  lives. 

A.  Frank  Geist  was  bom  in  1877  in  Northumberland  county,  Pa.,  and  has 
lived  at  H^ns  from  early  boyhood.  He  began  his  education  in  the  Hegins 
township  schools,  later  attended  graded  school  at  Hegins,  and  supplemented 
his  public  school  training  with  a  course  at  the  Shamokin  (Pa.)  business  college, 
in  his  native  county.  In  his  young  manhood  he  taught  eight  terms  of  school 
in  Hegins  township,  during  the  winter  season,  finding  employment  the  rest  of 
the  year  at  the  carpenter's  trade,  which  he  learned  partly  under  his  father's 
tuition.  It  was  only  a  step  from  that  vocation  to  his  present  line.  In  1907 
he  established  the  lumber  trade  and  planing  mill  at  Hegins  which  has  since 
occupied  most  of  his  time.  His  experience  as  a  carpenter  has  proved  an  extra 
qualification  for  the  business  he  now  follows,  assisting  him  in  judging  the 
quality  of  materials  and  filling  mill  orders  intelligently.  No  doubt  his  knowl- 
edge of  building  materials  and  requirements  has  had  much  to  do  with  the 
prosperity  of  his  enterprise,  for  it  has  been  gratifyingly  successful,  and  the 
plant  is  considered  one  of  the  most  useful  industrial  establishments  in  the 
locality.  Mr.  Geist  is  looked  upon  as  a  tmstworthy  man  in  every  respect.  His 
fellow  members  in  the  1.  O.  O.  F.  lodge  at  Hegins  have  chosen  him  secretary, 
and  he  is  serving  at  present  as  treasurer  of  the  Reformed  Church  of  Hegins, 
to  which  he  and  his  wife  belong.  Fidelity  to  all  his  obligations  is  one  of  the 
most  noteworthy  characteristics  he  possesses. 

In  1900  Mr.  Geist  married  Katie  Bair,  a  native  of  Hegins  township,  and  five 
children  have  been  bom  to  this  marriage :  Allen  H.,  Guy  A.,  Lloyd  W.,  TilHe 
V.  and  Eari  B. 

Cyrus  W.  Bair,  Mrs.  Geist's  father,  was  bom  in  Perry  county,  Pa.,  and 
her  grandfather,  Joseph  Bair,  was  also  a  native  of  that  county.  The  latter  was 
a  farmer  by  occupation.  The  father  leamed  the  trade  of  plasterer,  and  besides 
following  same  farmed  and  taught  school,  following  his  profession  for  more 
than  thirty  years,  in  the  Mahantongo  valley,  Schuylkill  county,  and  in  Dauphin 
county.  He  died  in  1910,  and  is  buried  at  Fountain,  in  Hegins  township.  He 
was  twice  married,  first  to  Isabella  Otto,  a  native  of  Hegins  township,  daughter 


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666  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

of  David  Otto,  a  farmer  of  that  township.  Mrs.  Isabella  Bair  died  about 
twenty-five  years,  ago,  and  is  buried  in  the  cemetery  at  Fountain.  She  was  the 
mother  of  two  children,  Mrs.  Geist  being  the  elder;  the  younger,  Jesse  A.  Bair, 
lives  at  Ashland,  Schuylkill  county.  For  his  second  wife  Mr.  Bair  married 
Mrs.  Sarah  Smith,  of  Barry  township,  Schuylkill  county,  and  to  this  union  were 
born  three  children:  Lydia  is  the  wife  of  Robert  Eckler,  of  Hegins;  Roy  S. 
and  Stephen  A.  also  live  at  Hegins,  making  their  home  with  their  sister,  Mrs. 
Eckler. 

EPHRAIM  YARNALL  owns  and  occupies  a  beautiful  farm  property  in 
Barry  township  which  has  been  developed  entirely  by  the  Yamalls.  The  fam- 
ily is  one  of  old  standing  in  this  section  of  Schuylkill  county  and  was  estab 
lished  here  by  Isaac  Yamall,  grandfather  of  Ephraim,  who  came  from  New 
Jersey  and  settled  in  the  Mahanoy  valley.  He  took  up  government  land  anu 
followed  farming.  His  family  consisted  of  eight  children,  viz. :  Anna,  John, 
Jonathan,  Francis,  Asa,  Elijah,  Annie,  and  one  that  died  young. 

John  Yamall,  father  of  Ephraim,  was  born  in  Mahanoy  township,  this 
county,  and  lived  to  the  age  of  eighty-three  years.  He  settled  on  the  farm 
in  Barry  township  where  his  son  Ephraim  now  lives,  cleared  the  land,  and 
made  great  progress  in  the  work  of  improvement,  whiqh  he  carried  on  for 
majiy  years.  He  is  buried  in  the  cemetery  near  the  farm.  Mr.  Yamall  mar- 
ried Mary  Rodenbeier,  who  was  bom  near  Ashland,  this  county,  daughter  of 
an  old  settler  in  this  part  of  the  State,  Jacob  Rodenbeier.  He  kept  the  hotel 
known  as  the  Red  Tavern,  near  Centralia.  Mr.  Rodenbeier  had  ten  children, 
namely:  Jacob,  Solomon,  Peter,  Philip,  David,  Rebecca,  Mary,  Lydia,  Susan 
and  Sarah.  Mrs.  Yamall  died  near  Ashland.  Of  her  six  children,  Mar>', 
Martha,  John,  Ephraim,  Reuben  and  Ezra,  Ephraim  is  the  only  survivor. 

Ephraim  Yamall  was  born  in  1837  in  Barry  township  and  grew  up  on  the 
farm,  attending  school  in  an  old  log  building  nearby.  During  his  school  years 
he  gave  his  spare  hours  to  assisting  with  the  farm  duties  at  home,  and  subse- 
quently devoted  all  his  time  to  the  operation  of  the  home  place,  working  in 
partnership  with  his  father  until  the  latter  retired  because  of  advancing  age. 
Under  his  competent  management  the  home  tract  has  undergone  steady  im- 
provement, Mr.  Yamall  sparing  neither  thought  nor  labor  in  the  advancement 
of  his  work.  Modem  methods,  the  intelligent  application  of  various  up-to- 
date  ideas,  have  resulted  in  increased  production  along  diflPerent  lines,  and  Mr. 
Yarnall  has  also  taken  much  pleasure  in  beautifying  his  surroundings,  as  the 
attractive  arrangements  and  comfortable  home  conditions  testify.  His'  opin- 
ions on  public  questions,  as  in  his  chosen  calling,  are  considered  practical  and 
worthy  of  attention,  and  his  neighbors  have  shown  their  faith  in  his  views 
and  character  by  electing  him  to  represent  them  in  various  capacities.  In  the 
offices  of  township  supervisor  and  member  of  the  school  board  he  has  done 
good  work  for  the  locality. 

In  i860  Mr.  Yarnall  married  Lucy  Sigenfuse,  who  was  born  in  the  same 
part  of  Barry  township  as  himself,  her  parents,  Charles  and  Susan  (Bixler) 
Sigenfuse,  having  settled  there  many  years  ago.  Mrs.  Sigenfuse  was  bom 
in  Mahantongo.  She  and  her  husband  died  when  comparatively  young.  Their 
family  consisted  of  six  children :  Betsy,  now  the  wife  of  Elias  Slopick,  of 
Mount  Carmel;  Lydia,  wife  of  Jacob  Umlauf,  of  Mount  Carmel;  Susan,  Mrs. 
Peter  Bradbury,  of  Tamaqua.  this  county;  Charles,  a  resident  of  Allentown, 
Pa. ;  Elias ;  and  Lucy,  Mrs.  Yarnall. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  667 

Of  the  thirteen  children  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Yamall  several  are  deceased; 
William  and  Franz  live  at  home ;  Charles  and  Irvin  are  also  located  in  Barry 
township;  Sallie  is  the  wife  of  Sam  Kessler,  a  farmer  of  Barry  township;  Cora 
is  married  to  Thomas  Hoch,  of  Barry  township;  Katie  is  the  wife  of  Albert 
Moser,  of  Pottsville.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Yamall  are  members  of  the  United 
Brethren  Church. 

WILSON  R.  DINGER,  a  farmer  of  Porter  township,  was  bom  in  Hegins 
township  Feb.  26,  1850,  son  of  Jonathan  Dinger,  and  grandson  of  Peter  Dinger. 
The  great-grandfather,  Frederick  Dinger,  came  from  Berks  county,  Pa.,  to 
become  one  of  the  first  settlers  of  Hegins  township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  Sub- 
sequently he  moved  to  Lower  Mahanoy  township,  where  he  died  upon  farm- 
ing property  owned  by  him. 

Peter  Dinger,  the  grandfather,  was  an  officer  of  the  war  of  1812.  He 
was  also  a  farmer  of  Hegins  township,  settling  on  the  homestead,  his  farm 
being  located  about  two  and  a  half  miles  above  the  borough  of  Hegins,  and 
comprising  225  acres  of  land.  There  he  died.  The  maiden  name  of  his  wife 
was  Magdalena  Hand,  and  they  had  these  children :  Catherine,  who  married 
Jacob  Crone;  Elizabeth,  who  married  John  Horn;  Mrs.  Eliza  Seitz;  Peter; 
Daniel;  William,  and  Jonathan.  The  latter  was  a  farmer  of  Hegins  township, 
the  Dinger  family  forming  a  little  settlement  in  this  township,  and  there  he 
resided  until  his  death  at  the  age  of  sixty-nine  years.  He  is  buried  in  Fountain 
cemetery.  Jonathan  Dinger  married  Catherine  Dinger,  a  daughter  of  George 
Dmger,  of  Hegins  township,  and  their  children  were :  Joel,  who  was  a  hotel 
man  of  Pottsville,  Pa.,  died  in  1914;  Frank  is  a  resident  of  Hegins  township; 
vVilson  R.  is  mentioned  below;  Amanda  married  John  Stutzman;  Alice  mar- 
ried (first)  Aaron  Heater  and  (second)  Harvey  Kline. 

Wilson  R.  Dinger  was  reared  on  the  family  homestead,  and  made  his  home 
there  until  he  was  fifty-three  years  old,  for  many  years  having  sole  charge  of 
the  property.  In  1913,  however,  he  bought  the  Berger  farm  at  Tower  City, 
and  has  forty  acres  of  land  in  an  excellent  state  of  cultivation.  Mr.  Dinger 
married  Maria  Lucas,  a  daughter  of  Emanuel  Lucas,  and  they  have  one  daugh- 
ter, Irene  Catherine,  bom  Feb.  21,  1915.  Independent  in  his  political  views, 
Mr.  Dinger  votes  for  the  man  rather  than  according  to  party  regulations. 
He  has  served  some  years  as  township  auditor.  He  is  a  member  of  the 
Lutheran  Church,  and  Mrs.  Dinger  is  a  member  of  the  Church  of  God  at 
Weishample.    Fraternally  he  belongs  to  the  K.  G.  E. 

Mr.  Dinger  was  one  of  the  organizers  of  the  First  National  Bank  of 
Hegins,  and  served  on  its  directorate  for  five  years,  but  refused  further  serv- 
ice, although  elected,  feeling  that  he  was  too  far  away  from  the  bank.  He  is 
still  a  stockholder.  The  Dinger  family  is  one  of  the  best  known  and  most 
highly  respected  in  this  part  of  the  county,  and  the  individual  members  are 
proving  themselves  worthy  of  their  name. 

HENRY  W.  KRAUS  is  one  of  the  leading  spirits'  in  agricultural  progress 
in  Ryon  township,  where  he  has  a  fine  farm  and  dairy,  both  branches  of  his 
business  exemplifying  his  advanced  ideas,  which  have  had  a  noticeable  eflPect 
on  raising  standards  all  over  his  section  of  Schuylkill  county. 

Mr.  Kraus  was  bom  Feb.  17,  1862,  at  Mahanoy  City,  this  county,  son  of 
William  and  Mary  (Kraus)  Kraus,  both  of  whom  were  natives  of  Germany, 
the  father  born  at  Seise,  the  mother  at  Reigelsdorf ,  in  the  same  vicinity.    Wil- 


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668  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

liam  Kraus  came  to  America  when  seventeen  years  old,  and  first  located  at 
Tamaqua,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  for  a  time  following  mining,  but  later  turning 
to  the  butcher  business.  Moving  to  Mahanoy  City  he  carried  on  business  there 
for  several  years,  until  he  purchased  the  John  Schlear  farm  in  Ryon  township, 
a  tract  of  150  acres  which  is  considered  one  of  the  finest  properties  in  the 
valley.  Most  of  the  buildings  on  that  place  are  of  his  construction,  though 
part  of  the  old  house  built  in  1829  is  still  standing.  There  Mr.  Kraus  died  in 
1888,  at  the  age  of  fifty-six  years,  and  he  is  buried  at  Tamaqua.  To  him  and 
his  wife  were  bom  nine  children,  four  of  whom  survive:  Mary,  who  married 
Mack  McMinity  and  settled  in  Meadville,  Pa. ;  Anna,  widow  of  John  Lathan ; 
William,  of  Rush  township,  this  county ;  and  Henry  W. 

Henry  W.  Kraus  received  his  education  in  the  pubhc  schools  of  Jonestown, 
Lebanon  county,  and  Mahanoy  City,  meantime  assisting  his  father  in  the 
butcher  business  until  he  reached  the  age  of  fourteen  years.  He  has  since  been 
occupied  with  farm  work.  In  1896  he  purchased  the  homestead  place  in  Ryon 
township,  above  mentioned,  and  in  the  twenty  years  which  have  elapsed  since 
has  made  numerous  improvements  thereon,  his  place  being  one  of  the  most 
valuable  in  the  lo<^ality.  He  has  taken  pleasure  in  developing  the  property, 
which  shows  the  intelligent  interest  with  which  he  has  followed  modem  meth- 
ods, everything  about  the  farm  being  up-to-date.  He  has  been  foremost  in  en- 
terprise among  the  farmers  of  his  neighborhood  in  adopting  new  ideas  for 
economy  of  labor  and  assuring  good  results,  and  his  success  has  been  an  encour- 
agement to  others  in  many  ways.  Mr.  Kraus  has  a  fine  dairy,  operated  in 
accordance  with  modern  views  on  the  production  of  clean,  wholesome  milk, 
which  he  ships  daily.  As  a  manager  he  has  shown  business  ability  beyond  the 
ordinary,  and  he  has  not  limited  his  activities  to  his  farm  work,  supporting 
any  movements  which  hold  promise  of  benefiting  the  community.  He  is  presi- 
dent of  the  Lakeside  Rural  Telephone  Company,  whose  line  has  been  a  great 
convenience  in  the  neighborhood*.  For  six  years  he  was  a  member  of  the  town- 
ship board  of  school  directors,  and  he  has  taken  an  active  part  in  promoting 
the  work  of  the  Grange  in  his  locality,  whereby  many  excellent  ideas  have 
been  brought  to  the  attention  of  the  farming  population.  Socially  he  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose,  and  his  religious  connection  is  with  the 
German  Lutheran  Church.  His  neighbors  regard  him  as  one  of  the  most 
valuable  citizens  in  this  region. 

In  September,  1884,  Mr.  Kraus  married  Maude  C.  Iffert,  daughter  of 
John  Iffert,  and  the  three  children  bom  to  this  union  are  all  living  at  home, 
viz.:  Gertmde,  widow  of  Herbert  Mengle;  John  W.,  who  married  Hattie 
Matthews  (he  is  a  member  of  the  school  board  of  Ryon  township  at  present)  ; 
and  Maude  C. 

ALEXANDER  THOMPSON  (deceased)  was  a  native  of  Scotland,  and 
came  to  this  country  during  his  young  manhood.  The  rest  of  his  life  was 
spent  in  Schuylkill  county,  Pa.,  where  he  was  widely  and  favorably  known 
during  his  active,  useful  career.  He  first  settled  at  Middleport,  where  he  was 
engaged  in  hauling  machinery,  timber,  etc.,  and  later  lived  at  the  York  Farm, 
near  Pottsville,  which  he  bought,  cultivating  that  tract  for  many  years.  He 
also  had  small  drifts  opened  on  the  property  and  sold  coal  to  the  public,  this 
being  the  first  coal  taken  from  the  workings  later  developed  into  the  famous 
York  Farm  colliery.  After  a  long  residence  there  he  removed  to  Porter 
township,  in  1854,  being  one  of  the  early  settlers  in  this  section,  where  he 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  669 

bought  a  farm  of  no  acres,  from  which  he  subsequently  sold  a  number  of 
building  lots  for  the  town  of  Sharadin,  which  was  laid  out  in  1869.  This  was 
his  home  until  his  death,  which  occurred  Dec.  4,  1873;  he  is  buried  in  the 
Greenwood  cemetery  in  Porter  township.  Besides  farming,  Mr.  Thompson 
ako  engaged  in  milling  in  Porter  township,  building  a  gristmill  upon  his  tract 
which  was  known  in  his  day  as  Thompson's  mill.  It  was  sold  to  Grimm  & 
Womer,  and  later  to  the  Reading  Company,  the  present  owners  of  the  land. 
Mr.  Thompson  was  a  man  of  intelligence  and  strong  character,  and  in  his 
day  was  one  of  the  most  influential  men  in  this  section. 

By  his  first  marriage,  to  Isabella  Pennman,  Mr.  Thompson  had  nine  chil- 
dren: George  was  killed  at  York  Farm;  David  P.,  deceased,  was  a  soldier  in 
the  Civil  war;  Elizabeth,  deceased, 'was  the  wife  of  Hiram  Kimmel;  Janette 
married  Benjamin  Houtz;  William  died  while  serving  in  the  Civil  war;  Alex- 
ander is  living  at  Lykens,  Pa.;  Robert  is  deceased;  Isabella  is  the  widow  of 
George  Powell;  James  is  living  in  West  Virginia.  For  his  second  wife  Mr. 
Thompson  married  Mary  Bast,  daughter  of  Isaac  Bast,  and  by  this  union  there 
was  also  a  large  family:  Isaac  B. ;  George,  who  is  now  living  in  Alaska; 
Mary,  wife  of  Daniel  Stout ;  John,  residing  at  Sharadin,  Pa. ;  Andrew,  a  resi- 
dent of  Michigan;  Charles,  deceased;  Abraham,  deceased;  Winfield  S.,  of 
Michigan ;  William  U.  S.  G.,  deceased ;  Elmer  E.,  of  Sharadin ;  and  Rebecca 
M.,  wife  of  Hoplin  Evans,  living  on  the  old  Thompson  homestead  in  Porter 
township. 

Hon.  Alexander  Thompson,  eldest  surviving  son  of  Alexander  Thompson, 
has  been  a  very  prominent  man  in  his  district,  a  member  of  the  Dauphin 
county  bar  and  at  one  time  a  member  of  the  State  Senate.  During  the  Civil 
war  he  served"  in  the  Urfion  army.  His  home  is  at  Lykens,  Dauphin  county, 
and  he  is  also  very  well  known  in  Schuylkill  county.  Since  191 2  he  has  been 
blind,  having  lost  his  sight  in  an  explosion  on  his  farm  at  Lykens. 

Isaac  B.  Thompson,  eldest  son  of  Alexander  and  Mary  (Bast)  Thompson, 
was  bom  Dec.  26,  1853,  at  York  Farm,  and  had  ordinary  school  advantages 
during  his  early  boyhood.  When  twelve  years  old  he  began  picking  slate,  and 
he  continued  to  be  employed  about  the  mines  for  a  period  of  twenty-eight 
years.  Then  he  turned  to  carpenter  work,  which  he  has  been  following  ever 
since.  His  home  is  at  Sharadin,  in  Porter. township,  and  he  is  one  of  the  well 
known  citizens  of  the  valley,  having  taken  an  active  interest  in  local  affairs 
for  a  number  of  years.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  Porter  township  school 
board,  and  served  the  township  as  tax  collector  for  twelve  years.  Socially  he 
belongs  to  the  Knights  of  Pythias  at  Tower  City.  Mr.  Thompson  was  one  of 
the  executors  of  his  father's  estate,  serving  with  his  brothers  David  P.  and  A. 
F.  Thompson. 

Mr.  Thompson  married  Mary  Goodman,  daughter  of  William  Goodman, 
and  the  following  children  were  bom  to  them:  Cora,  wife  of  Francis  W. 
Shomber;  Arthur;  Charles;  Ralph;  Lillie,  deceased;  Roy;  Mary  wife  of 
Wilbur  Kaufman;  Carrie,  wife  of  Harry  Shomber;  Russell;  Lester,  deceased; 
and  Leona,  wife  of  Clarence  Lenkert.  The  family  are  Methodists  in  religious 
connection.  Mrs.  Thompson  died  in  January,  191 1,  and  is  buried  in  the  Green- 
WDod  cemetery  in  Porter  township. 

GABRIEL  B.  DERR,  an  old  resident  of  the  borough  of  Tremont,  now 
living  retired  after  many  years  in  the  service  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading 
Railway  Company,  is  a  native  of  Schuylkill  county  and  of  old  Pennsylvania 


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670  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

stock.  His  grandfather,  John  Derr,  was  bom  in  this  State,  where  the  family 
has  been  established  since  the  pioneer  period,  the  earlier  generations  living  in 
Lehigh  county  for  many  years  and  moving  thence  to  Northumberland  county. 
John  Derr  settled  in  the  Shamokin  valley  in  Northumberland  county,  remain- 
ing there  until  his  death.  He  was  a  shoemaker  by  trade  and  also  followed 
farming.  Besides  James,  the  father  of  Gabriel  B.  Derr,  his  children  were: 
Benjamin,  the  eldest,  who  lived  to  be  ninety-two  years  old ;  Peter,  the  second, 
who  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-nine  years ;  Jacob,  who  attained  the  age  of  ninety ; 
George,  who  died  when  fifty  years  old;  Kate;  Matilda;  Elizabeth,  who 
reached  the  age  of  ninety-six  years ;  one  that  died  in  infancy ;  and  Mary. 

James  Derr,  son  of  John,  was  bom  in  the  Shamokin  valley  in  Northum- 
berland county  in  the  year  1818,  and  moved  thence  to  Schuylkill  county,  set- 
tling in  the  Mahantongo  valley  in  1836.  Afterwards  he  moved  to  Porter  town- 
ship, and  from  there  in  i860  to  Tremont,  where  he  passed  the  remainder  of 
his  days,  dying  May '9,  1890.  During  his  residence  in  this  county  James  Derr 
engaged  in  farming,  and  also  followed  the  lumber  business.  In  Porter  town- 
ship he  married  Catherine  Haertter,  who  was  bom  in  Bavaria,  Germany, 
daughter  of  Christ  Haertter.  Her  father  was  also  bom  in  Bavaria,  Germany, 
and  when  he  came  to  America  first  located  at  Reading,  Pa.,  later  moving  to 
Pine  Grove,  Schuylkill  county,  and  then  to  Porter  township,  this  county, 
where  he  died  in  1852.  By  trade  he  was  a  brushmaker,  and  he  followed  farm- 
ing as  well.  His  children  were:  Christ,  Jacob,  Casper,  Mary,  Barbara  and 
Catherine.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  James  Derr  had  the  following  children :  Regina, 
the  eldest,  now  deceased ;  Gabriel  B. ;  John,  who  lives  at  Tremont ;  Catherine, 
deceased;  Mary,  deceased;  Emma,  deceased;  and  George,  deceased.  All  but 
Catherine  died  at  Tremont,  where  they  are  buried. 

Gabriel  B.  Derr  was  bom  June  13,  1844,  in  Porter  township,  this  county, 
where  he  was  reared.  In  his  early  boyhood  he  helped  with  the  farm  work  at 
home.  When  thirteen  years  old  he  came  to  Tremont,  where  he  worked  with 
his  father  in  the  timber  business  until  1868,  in  which  year  he  entered  the 
employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company.  He  began  rail- 
road work  as  a  trackman,  later  became  brakeman,  and  worked  up  to  the  posi- 
tion of  conductor  and  baggageman,  being  so  engaged  for  some  time.  He  was 
retired  July  i,  1914,  and  is  now  on  the  pension  list. 

Mr.  Derr  is  respected  by  all  his  fellow  citizens,  among  whom  he  had  a  wide 
acquaintance.  He  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic, 
being  commander  of  the  post  at  Tremont.  In  1864  he  enlisted  from  Tremont, 
joining  Company  D,  i6th  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Cavalry,  with  which  he 
served  until  the  close  of  the  Civil  war,  being  mustered  out  at  Richmond,  Va., 
in  August,  1865.  He  took  part  in  the  actions  around  Petersburg  and  in  other 
importanf  battles.  Mr.  Derr  also  holds  membership  in  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  and 
the  I.  O.  O.  F.,  at  Tremont,  and  is  especially  interested  in  the  Odd  Fellows, 
having  passed  all  the  chairs  in  the  local  lodge.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Lutheran 
Church  in  the  borough. 

On  March  2y,  1873,  Mr.  Derr  married  Sarah  Betz,  and  they  have  had 
children  as  follows:  Emma  and  George  (twins),  Edward,  Rutherford, 
Charles,  Martha,  and  William,  the  last  named  deceased.  George,  who  is  living 
at  Tremont,  was  in  the  service  during  the  Spanish-American  war.  having 
enlisted  from  Philadelphia;  Rutlterford,  who  lives  at  Pottsville,  this  county, 
also  served  in  the  Spanish- American  war;  Edward  is  a  resident  of  AUentown, 
Pa. ;  Charles  lives  at  Tremont ;  Martha  is  the  wife  of  Leo  Frille,  of  Tremont. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  671 

Peter  and  Esther  (Bowen)  Betz,  Mrs.  Derr's  parents,  settled  in  Potts- 
ville,  Schuylkill  county,  in  1875,  and  he  followed  the  trade  of  painter  there 
for  many  years.  The  family  subsequently  moved  to  Berwick,  Pa.,  where  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Betz  ended  their  days,  her  death  occurring  in  March,  1905,  his  in 
July,  1913.  He  was  one  of  a  large  family,  among  his  brothers  being  Daniel 
and  Charles.  Mrs.  Betz  was  also  a  member  of  a  large  family,  her  parents  hav- 
ing children  as  follows :  James,  Henry,  William,  Charles,  Sarah,  Katherine, 
Susan,  Esther  and  Emma.  We  have  the  following  record  of  the  children  bom 
to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Betz:  Henry  the  eldest,  is  deceased;  Edward  is  deceased; 
Howard  is  a  resident  of  Schuylkill  Haven;  George  lives  at  Pottsville,  this 
county;  Charles  is  located  at  Berwick;  Sarah,  who  was  born  at  Lehighton, 
Carbon  Co.,  Pa.,  is  Mrs.  Gabriel  B.  Derr;  Frank  is  in  Philadelphia.  The  last 
named  is  a  veteran  of  the  Spanish-American  war.  Peter  Betz,  the  father, 
served  three  years  in  the  Union  army  during  the  Civil  war. 

JOHN  C.  SCHILLING  has  been  engaged  in  business  at  Ashland  since  1900. 
He  bears  a  name  highly  respected  in  this  section,  being  a  grandson  of  Peter 
Schilling,  who  emigrated  to  this  country  from  Germany  in  1855,  settHng  at 
Ashland  when  it  had  but  five  houses  on  the  present  town  site.  He  was  em- 
ployed at  the  mines.  During  the  Civil  war  he  served  in  the  Union  army, 
and  he  was  a  man  of  solid  worth  cfnd  one  of  the  esteemed  citizens  of  this 
region  to  the  end  of  his  days.  At  the  time  of  his  death  he  was  living  in  Cen- 
tralia,  just  over  the  line  in  Columbia  county.  He  was  the  father  of  three 
children,  Philip,  John  and  Peter,  all  of  whom  are  now  deceased.  John  moved 
out  to  Minnesota,  where  he  took  up  government  land,  became  wealthy,  and 
remained  there  until  the  end  of  his  days. 

Peter  Schilling,  son  of  Peter  Schilling,  was  bom  in  Bavaria,  Germany,  and 
was  but  a  boy  when  the  family  came  to  America.  He  was  soon  afterwards 
bound  out  to  a  farmer,  and  continued  to  follow  agricultural  work  until  he 
became  a  young  man,  after  which  he  was  engaged  on  the  railroad  for  forty 
years  as  foreman  with  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Company.  In  this  capacity 
he  built  the  Mine  Hill  railroad,  the  first  railroad  in  this  part  of  Pennsylvania. 
He  was  regarded  as  one  of  the  substantial  citizens  of  Ashland,  where  he 
was  a  member  of  the  Washington  Fire  Company  and  interested  in  all  the 
aflfairs  of  the  locality.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Church,  and 
helped  to  build  the  first  German  Catholic  Church  at  Ashland.  PoHtically  he 
was  a  stanch  Democrat.  Mr.  Schilling  married  Emma  Schmidt,  who  was  bom 
at  Reading,  Pa.,  and  died  April  12,  1897,  at  Ashland.  Of  the  children  bom 
to  this  union  all  died  in  infancy  but  John  C.  The  father  died  at  Ashland  March 
10,  191 1.  ^ 

Theodore  Schmidt,  father  of  Mrs.  Peter  Schilling,  was  a  native  of  Ger- 
many, and  leamed  the  business  of  painting  and  decorating  there,  acquiring 
considerable  reputation  before  his  emigration  to  America.  He  settled  at  Read- 
ing, Pa.,  and  afterwards  came  to  Ashland,  and  followed  his  calling  very  suc- 
cessfully, being  one  of  the  finest  in  his  line  in  this  section  of  Pennsylvania.  He 
died  at  Ashland  when  sixty-three  years  old.  His  wife's  maiden  name  was 
Webber.     He  was  the  father  of  twenty-four  children. 

John  C.  Schilling  was  bom  Sept.  t.j,  1874,  at  Ashland,  where  he  was  reared 
and  educated.  In  1900  he  commenced  business  on  his  own  account,  establish- 
ing himself  at  his  present  location  at  No.  1839  Centre  street.  He  has  always 
carried  a  complete  general  stock  and  in  1904  he  added  a  meat  market,  which 


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672  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

has  been  continued  ever  since.  By  honorable  methods  and  his  accommodat- 
ing disposition  Mr.  Schilling  has  succeeded  in  building  up  a  profitable  trade 
which  has  shown  a  wholesome  jncrease  from  the  beginning,  and  he  has  estab- 
lished himself  among  the  substantial  merchants  of  the  borough.  His  thrift  and 
reliability  in  business  have  attracted  the  attention  of  his  fellow  citizens,  who 
have  honored  him  with  election  as  member  of  the  council,  in  which  body  he 
has  served  two  years,  1912-1914.  His  official  duties  are  discharged  with 
characteristic  consideration  for  the  best  interests  of  his  constituents.  He  is 
a  member  of  St.  Mauritius'  Church  at  Ashland,  and  is  a  grand  knight  of  Sarto 
Council,  Knights  of  Columbus. 

On  May  26,  1896,  Mr.  Schilling  married  Mary  Llewellyn,  who  was  bom 
in  Ashland,  daughter  of  David  and  Mary  (Rhoades)  Llewellyn,  the  former 
of  whom  died  Nov.  21,  1901.  He  was  an  engineer  at  the  mines.  Mrs.  Llewel- 
Ivn,  now  (1914)  sixty-one  years  of  age,  makes  her  home  at  Ashland.  Their 
family  consisted  of  sixteen  children,  and  we  have  record  of :  David,  who  is 
foreman  at  the  Excelsior  colliery;  Harr)^,  a  mason  contractor;  Mary,  Mrs. 
Schilling;  Hannah;  William,  head  mechanic  of  the  Excelsior  colliery;  Charles; 
Abraham,  a  graduate  of  Girard  College,  now  engaged  as  a  civil  engineer. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  C.  Schilling  have  been  bom  seven  children,  of  whom 
but  three  survive:  Leo  (now  aged  thirteen  years),  Emma  and  Catherine. 
The  others  died  in  infancy. 

VALENTINE  W.  QUIGEL,  cashier  of  the  First  National  Bank  at  Hegins, 
is  considered  one  of  the  ablest  financiers  of  his  section  of  Schuylkill  county.  His 
reputation  has  been  built  up  in  years  of  exemplary  service  in  positions  of  great 
responsibility,  his  present  connection  dating  from  the  *  establishment  of  the 
bank,  in  igo8, 

Mr.  Quigel  is  a  worthy  representative  of  old  Pennsylvania  stock,  the  fam- 
,  ily  having  been  founded  here  during  the  Provincial  period.  The  name  itself 
has  been  anglicized,  its  original  form  being  Quickel.  Quigel  and  its  earlier 
variations  are  mentioned  in  a  work  on  the  "Teutonic  Name  System,"  by  a  Ger- 
man author,  who  claims  that  the  root  of  the  name  is  found  in  the  ancient  Norse 
language,  the  original  meaning  being  "sword."  The  founder  of  the  family  was 
evidently  a  maker  of  swords  or  very  dexterous  in  handling  them,  hence  the 
surname.  In  the  year  1736  there  arrived  at  the  port  of  Philadelphia,  in  the 
ship  "Fantana,"  a  number  of  German  emigrants,  among  the  passengers  over 
sixteen  years  old  being  John  M.  and  John  P.  Quigel,  as  well  as  other  members 
of  the  family,  including  Christian,  George  and  Peter  Quigel.  The  "Fantana** 
sailed  from  Rotterdam,  Holland,  and  it  is  probable  the  Quigels  came  to  that 
port  down  the  Rhine  from  their  home  in  the  Palatinate,  in  the  Grand  Duchy 
of  Baden,  where  many  bearing  the  name  of  Quickel  are  still  to  be  found.  Chris- 
tian Quigel  was  a  son  of  John  P.  Quigel,  and  they  settled  in  Lancaster,  the 
others  in  York  county,  Pa.  (York  cotmty,  however,  was  not  separated  from 
Lancaster  until  the  late  forties.) 

Christian  Quigel,  who  came  to  this  country  in  the  "Fantana"  with  his  father, 
John  P.  Quigd,  was  the  ancestor  of  Valentine  W.  Quigel.  He  lived  in  Man- 
heim  township,  Lancaster  Co.,  Pa.,  and  enlisted  from  that  township  for  service 
in  the  Revolutionary  war,  Aug.  27,  1776.  He  was  a  soldier  in  Colonel  Swope's 
battalion,  part  of  the  troops  of  the  celebrated  "Flying  Camp"  commanded  by 
General  Washington  on  Long  Island.  Reference  to  his  service  may  be  found 
in  the  Pennsylvania  Archives.    Christian  Quigel  had  six  children :    Peter,  who 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  673 

was  a  soldier  in  the  Revolution;  Balzer,  who  removed  to  that  part  of  North- 
umberland county  now  known  as  Lycoming,  and  was  the  ancestor  of  the  fam- 
ily at  Quigelville;  Nicholas,  ancestor  of  the  McElhattan  (Pa.)  Quigels;  Philip, 
a  Revolutionary  soldier,  ancestor  of  the  branch  of  the  family  found  at  Pine 
Station,  Clinton  Co.,  Pa.;  Michael,  who  settled  in  Northumberland  county  (he 
was  the  ancestor  of  Hon.  A.  J.  Quigley) ;  and  Catherine,  who  married  John 
Myers. 

The  descendants  of  these  six  children  of  Christian  Quigel,  as  well  as  the 
other  Quigels  and  Quickels  who  came  to  this  coimtry  in  the  early  days,  have 
become  scattered  all  over  Pennsylvania,  Ohio,  the  West  and  the  South,  and 
include  a  number  of  persons  of  dictinction  and  renown,  notably  Hon.  William 
B.  Allison,  United  States  senator  from  Iowa,  and  Hon.  Hoke  Smith,  secre- 
tary of  th^  Interior  in  Cleveland's  cabinet.  The  Maclaurin  family  of  South 
Carolina,  and  the  Montgomery,  Allen,  Crawford,  Crane,  Stewart,  McCormick, 
White,  Williams,  Grier,  Baird,  Welsh,  Guise,  Mobly,  Hess,  Simons,  Shaw, 
Hanna  and  other  well  known  families  of  this  section  of  Pennsylvania,  are  also 
connected  with  the  Quigels. 

Balzer  Quigel,  son  of  Christian,  married  Rosanna  Fink,  by  whom  he  had 
children :    George,  John  and  Michael. 

George  Quigel,  son  of  Balzer,  died  in  1884,  aged  ninety-six  years.  He  mar- 
ried Leah  Kinley,  and  their  children  were:  Michael,  Jesse,  John,  Ambrose, 
Mary  Ann,  Catherine,  Lydia  and  Sophia. 

John  Quigel,  son  of  George,  was  bom  July  9,  1838,  at  Quigelville,  Lycom- 
ing Co.,  Pa.,  and 'was  reared  there.  He  had  the  conmion  school  advantages 
afforded  in  the  home  neighborhood,  and  followed  farming  throughout  his 
active  years.  In  religion  he  was  a  Lutheran,  in  politics  a  Democrat.  During 
the  Civil  war  he  was  in  the  Union  service  from  September,  1862,  to  August, 
1863,  belonging  to  Captain  Dodd's  company,  of  the  77th  Pennsylvania  Volun- 
teer Infantry.  Mr.  Quigel  married  Julia  Ann  Capple,  a  native  of  Germany, 
who  came  to  America  when  two  years  old  with  her  parents,  George  and  Mar- 
garet Capple,  both  now  deceased;  the  Capples  resided  in  Lewis  township, 
Lycoming  coimty.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Quigel  had  three  children,  Valentine 
W.,  Sylvester  and  Margaret. 

Valentine  W.  Quigel  was  bom  April  i,  1862,  at  Quigelville,  Lycoming  Co., 
Pa.  His  education  was  acquired  in  the  schools  of  his  native  county,  and 
included  instruction  in  the  normal  school  at  Muncy,  Pa.  In  his  early  manhood 
he  taught  for  three  terms,  but  bookkeeping  was  his  business  profession,  and  he 
was  engaged  in  that  kind  of  work  for  years.  In  1879  he  went  to  WjUiams- 
port,  Lycoming  county,  and  entered  the  employ  of  J.  C.  Green  &  Co.,  with  whom 
he  remained  until  1885.  That  year  he  became  connected  with  the  railway  mail 
service,  in  which  he  continued  during  Cleveland's  administration.  For  four 
years  he  was  with  the  Gazette  &  Bulletin  Publishing  Association  at  Williams- 
port,  served  for  five  years  as  secretary  of  the  Pennsylvania  Beneficial  Associa- 
tion, and  in  1908  came  to  Hegins,  where  he  has  since  been  established.  His 
comprehensive  knowledge  and  understanding  of  financial  questions  was  so  gen- 
eraiy  recognized  that  he  was  called  upon  to  serve  the  city  of  Williamsport  as 
treasurer  and  the  county  of  Lycoming  as  auditor,  filling  each  office  for  two 
terms  to  the  entire  satisfaction  of  his  fellow  citizens. 

The  First  National  Bank  of  Hegins  was  organized  April  23,  1908,  with  local 
capital,  F.  P.  Bamd  of  Hegins  being  the  first  president  and  one  of  the  original 
board  of  directors,  his  fellow  members  being :    H.  William  Bressler,  R.  R.  Artz, 
Vol.  II— 5 


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674  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Mr.  D.  E.  Kurtz,  W.  R.  Dinger,  S.  W.  Kessler,  G.  W.  Baum,  S.  A.  Buffington, 
H.  H.  Geist,  Dr.  W.  D.  Karterman,  Moses  Schadel  and  John  W.  Heckert.  Dr. 
Kartemian  is  now  president,  and  serving  with  him  on  the  board  of  directors 
are  H.  W.  Bressler,  W.  R.  Dinger,  H.  H.  Geist,  W.  W.  Haas,  M.  W.  Kessler, 
S.  E.  Kessler,  H.  Fred  Lauer  (of  Ashland,  Pa.),  V.  W.  Quigel,  Moses  Schadel, 
L.  L.  Snyder  and  C.  F.  Otto.  Mr.  Lauer  is  secretary  of  the  board.  Mr.  Quigel 
has  filled  the  position  of  cashier  uninterruptedly  since  the  bank  was  organized, 
and  his  services  and  advice  have  been  of  inestimable  value  in  the  direction  of 
its  aflfairs.  The  capital  stock  is  $50,000,  and  there  is  at  present  a  surplus  of 
$12,000,  the  undivided  profits  amounting  to  over  $2,000.  The  sound  principles 
which  have  characterized  the  operation  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Hegins 
from  the  beginning  have  had  an  appreciably  beneficial  influence  upon  business 
activities  in  the  town  and  adjacent  territory  in  Schuylkill  county.  Much  of 
the  credit  for  the  wholesome  conditions  it  has  helped  to  create  and  maintain 
must  be  assigned  to  Mr.  Quigel's  clear-headedness. 

Mr.  Quigel  is  a  Democrat  in  politics,  in  which  he  takes  a  real  interest,  a 
member  of  the  Lutheran  Church,  and  socially  connected  with  the  Royal 
Arcanum  and  Modem  Woodmen  of  America. 

On  July  8,  1886,  Mr.  Quigel  married  Jennie  L.  Smith,  who  died  Jan.  5, 
1887.  On  Jan.  3,  1889,  he  married  (second)  Caroline  Hadtner,  and  they  have 
one  child,  Beatrice  E.,  now  an  employee  in  the  First  National  Bank  at  Hegins ; 
Miss  Quigel  holds  a  commission  as  notary  public. 

CHARLES  A.  SCHROPE,  who  is  engaged  in  business  at  Tower  City  as  a 
contracting  miner,  was  bom  at  Valley  View,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  in  1882,  and 
is  a  son  of  George  W.  and  Elizabeth  (Smith)  Schrope,  grandson  of  Amos 
Schrope,  great-grandson  of  John  Schrope,  and  great-great-grandson  of 
Andrew  Schrope. 

Andrew  Schrope  was  bom  in  Germany,  and  at  about  the  time  of  the 
war  of  the  Revolution  became  a  pioneer  of  Valley  View,  Schuylkill  county, 
where  he  took  up  a  large  tract  of  land.  His  operations  were  very  extensive 
in  scope,  as  may  be  judged  from  the  fact  that  his  property,  now  cut  up,  con- 
tained what  is  now  six  farms,  all  of  great  size.  There  he  passed  the  remain- 
ing years  of  his  life,  one  of  the  substantial  and  reliable  men  of  his  community, 
an  influential  voice  in  civic  affairs  and  a  force  for  progress  and  advancement 
along  all  lines.  He  died  and  was  buried  in  the  Sacramento  community  of 
Hubley  township.    He  was  the  father  of  two  sons,  John  and  Andrew. 

John  Schrope,  son  of  the  pioneer,  followed  in  his  father's  footsteps  and 
when  ready  to  adopt  an  occupation  of  his  own  took  up  farming.  Through 
thrift,  industry  and  good  management  his  affairs  prospered,  and  he  became 
^he  owner  of  325  acres  of  valuable  land  in  Hegins  township  and  a  man  of 
worth  and  substance  in  his  locality.  His  life  was  devoted  to  the  cultivation  of 
the  soil,  and  his  death  occurred  near  Sacramento,  where  he  was  laid  to  rest. 
Mr.  Schrope  married  Maud  Halderman,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  four 
children:  Amos,  Jacob,  Maria  and  Kate.  After  the  death  of  his  first  wife 
Mr.  Schrope  was  again  married,  to  Lydia  Haas,  but  there  were  no  children 
bom  to  this  union. 

Amos  Schrope,  the  grandfather  of  Charles  A.  Schrope,  was  bom  on  his 
father's  homestead  in  Hegins  Township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  there  received 
his  education  and  grew  to  manhood.  When  ready  to  establish  a  home  of 
his  own  he  secured  a  part  of  the  homestead  place,  105  acres,  to  the  cultivation 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  675 

and  development  of  which  he  devoted  the  entire  period  of  his  active  life.  He 
still  survives,  in  comfortable  retirement,  at  his  home  at  Valley  View.  Mr. 
Schrope  has  upheld  the  family  name  for  public-spirited  participation  in  civic 
affairs,  and  has  served  capably  and  faithfully  in  various  offices,  including 
those  of  school  director  and  tax  collector.  Always  a  man  of  the  strictest 
integrity,  he  has  well  merited  the  esteem  and  confidence  in  which  he  is  held 
by  those  among  whom  his  Hfe  has  been  passed.  Mr.  Schrope  married  Harriet 
Haas,  daughter  of  Isaac  Haas,  of  Mahantongo  Valley,  and  four  children  were 
bom  to  this  union :  Monroe,  who  is  deceased ;  George  W. ;  Ellen,  who  is  the 
wife  of  Emanuel  Schmeltz;  and  Webster,  who  resides  with  his  father  at  Val- 
ley View. 

George  W.  Schrope,  father  of  Charles  A.  Schrope,  was  bom  at  Valley 
View,  Hegins  township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  Oct.  lo,  1864,  and  received  his 
education  in  the  public  schools  of  that  community.  He  remained  at  home  on 
the  farm,  assisting  his  father,  until  he  was  seventeen  years  of  age,  at  which 
time  he  secured  employment  as  a  laborer  at  the  Brookside  colliery.  Later  he 
turned  his  attention  to  mining,  at  which,  he  was  engaged  for  about  fifteen 
years,  then  returning  to  the  homestead  and  engaging  in  farming  for  eight 
years.  Then  he  again  went  to  the  Brookside  colliery,  where  for  three  years 
he  was  a  miner,  and  through  his  eflForts  won  promotion  to  the  position  of 
assistant  inside  foreman,  a  capacity  in  which  he  acted  for  seven  years.  In  1912 
he  was  made  foreman  at  the  East  Brookside  colliery,  and  this  post  he  continues 
to  fill,  being  one  of  his  company's  most  trusted  men.  Mr.  Schrope  married 
Elizabeth  Smith,  daughter  of  John  Smith,  of  Mahantongo  Valley,  and  to  this 
union  there  were  bom  the  following  children :  Charles  A. ;''  John,  whose 
death  occurred  when  he  was  seven  years  old;  Kate,  who  is  the  wife  of 
Charles  Long;  Lillie, 'who  is  the  wife  of  Harry  Miller;  George,  who  resides 
at  Tower  City;  Robert,  also  a  resident  of  that  community;  Minnie,  who  is 
the  wife  of  A.  Hoffler;  Jacob,  who  is  a  student  at  Haverford  College;  Eva, 
wife  of  Charles  Shuey;  Mabel,  who  resides  with  her  parents;  and  Harriet, 
who  died  when  nine  months  old.  The  mother  of  these  children  died  in  April, 
1913,  deeply  mourned  by  a  wide  circle  of  friends.  Mr.  Schrope  is  one  of  the 
well  known  men  of  his  community  and  an  influential  factor  in  civic  affairs. 
He  has  served  capably  as  a  member  of  the  school  board  of  Tower  City.  Fra- 
ternally he  is  affiliated  with  the  local  lodges  of  the  Junior  Order  United  Amer- 
ican Mechanics,  the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men  and  the  Loyal  Order  of 
Moose. 

Charles  A.  Schrope  was  still  a  lad  when  brought  by  his  parents  to  Tower 
City,  and  here  his  education  was  secured  in  the  public  schools.  He  was  but  a 
boy  when  he  secured  employment  in  the  mines,  and  when  only  seventeen  years 
of  ape  began  to  cut  coal,  a  business  at  which  he  has  spent  the  greater  part  of 
his  life.  For  three  years  he  was  fire  boss  at  the  Silver  Creek  colliery,  at  the 
end  of  that  time  returning  to  Tower  City,  and  he  is  now  employed  at  the  West 
Brookside  colliery,  where  he  is  known  as  a  highly  efficient,  reliable  and  faith- 
ful workman  and  skilled  miner.  As  a  citizen  he  has  been  a  leader  in  move- 
ments which  have  made  for  progress  and  advancement,  and  has  willingly  given 
of  his  services  in  behalf  of  the  elevation  of  educational  standards,  having 
served  for  some  years  as  a  member  of  the  school  board  of  Porter  township. 
He  also  took  the  census  of  that  township  in  igio.  Fraternally  Mr.  Schrope  is 
a  member  of  the  Junior  Order  United  American  Mechanics,  Improved  Order 


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676  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

of  Red  Men,  Knights  of  Pythias  and  Loyal  Order  of  Moose,  in  all  of  which 
orders  he  has  numerous  warm  friends^ 

Mr.  Schrope  was  united  in  marriage  with  Anna  May  Heartter,  daughter  of 
David  Heartter,  of  Reinerton,  Pa.,  and  to  this  union  there  have  been  bora 
five  children,  namely:  Susie,  Annie,  Charles,  Eva  and  Beatrice,  who  died 
when  seven  months  old. 

WILLIAM  W.  KAUP  is  undoubtedly  one  of  the  best  known  residents  of 
Rush  township,  where  he  has  a  good  farm  which  he  cultivates,  and  also  acts 
as  mail  carrier  on  Rural  Route  No.  2,  out  of  Tamaqua,  covering  his  home 
township  and  part  of  Ryon.  township.  He  has  filled  a  number  of  public 
offices  in  the  township,  and  in  the  discharge  of  all  his  responsibilities  has  shown 
consistent  integrity  and  fidelity  to  the  interests  of  his  fellow  citizens,  in  whose 
respect  he  feels  well  rewarded.  Mr.  Kaup  is  a  native  of  the  township,  bom 
July  16,  185 1,  son  of  William  Kaup  and  grandson  of  John  Kaup. 

John  Kaup  was  bom  Dec.  23,  1783,  in  Wurtemberg,  Germany,  and  when 
he  came  to  America  settled  in  Schuylkill  counter.  Pa.,  first  in  West  Penn  town- 
ship, whence  he  removed  to  Rush  township  m  the  year  1830.  He  owned  a 
farm  of  forty-seven  acres  about  two  miles  from  Tamaqua,  which  he  cleared, 
and  the  stable  which  he  built  there  in  1831  is  still  standing.  He  also  erected 
a  log  house  on  the  property.  His  death  occurred  Jan.  21,  1853,  in  his  seven- 
tieth year,  and  he  is  buried  at  Dutch  Hill,  Xamaqua.  His  wife,  Anna  (Ben- 
singer),  bom  in  April,  1788,  died  in  January,  1849.  Their  children  were: 
Lucetta,  Mrs.  William  Kramer;  William;  Levi,  who  died  in  Illinois;  Solomon, 
who  died  in  Ohio;  Priscilla,  Mrs.  Harry  Bischoif;  Benjamin,  who  died  in 
Ohio;  Maltida,  Mrs.  Abraham  Boocher;  Daniel,  who  died  at  Williamsport, 
Pa. ;  and  Sarah  Ann,  Mrs.  Charles  Phillips. 

William  Kaup,  son  of  John,  was  bom  in  181 1,  and  died  at  the  age  of 
seventy-seven  years.  He  was  buried  in  the  White  Church  cemetery  in  Rush 
township.  He  followed  farming  on  his  father's  homestead,  in  Rush  township, 
continuing*  to  engage  in  agricultural  pursuits  throughout  his  life.  He  was  one 
of  three  men  who  had  charge  of  the  teams  that  hauled  the  first  engine,  from 
Philadelphia,  shipped  from  England  for  the  Little  Schuylkill  Mining  Com- 
pany at  Tamaqua.  His  progressive  spirit  is  shown  in  his  advocacy  of  the 
public  school  system,  in  the  establishment  of  which  he  took  an  active  part. 
He  married  Lydia  Lindner,  daughter  of  Samuel  Lindner,  whose  wife  was  a 
Sensensdorfer,  member  of  a  Revolutionary  family;  the  Lindners  were  of 
German  origin.  Children  as  follows  were  bom  to  this  union :  Isabella,  who 
married  Thomas  Baker;  Sevilla,  who  married  William  Reinhart;  Solomon, 
who  died  when  twenty-two  years  old;  Mary  M.,  who  married  Lewis  Kline; 
Sarah  Ann,  who  died  in  infancy ;  William  W. ;  and  Lydia  E. 

William  W.  Kaup  was  reared  upon  the  homestead  farm,  where  he  now 
makes  his  home.  He  has  not  devoted  all  his  life  to  agriculture,  having  for 
several  years  been  associated  with  the  American  Ice  Company  as  superintend- 
ent of  their  Schuylkill  county  plant.  After  his  parents  died  he  took  the  home 
property,  which  he  has  been  improving  materially  ever  since,  having  built  a 
fine  dwelling  thereon  in  1903.  In  1904  Mr.  Kaup  was  appointed  to  his  posi- 
tion of  mral  mail  carrier,  in  which  capacity  he  has  served  efficiently  since. 
Mr.  Kaup  has  been  a  prominent  worker  in  the  Republican  party  for  many 
years,  and  he  has  been  elected  to  several  local  offices,  having  served  for  a 
iong  period  as  township  clerk,  and  for  twenty  years  he  was  general  assessor. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  677 

In  February,  1876,  Mr.  Kaup  married  Catherine  Walter,  and  the  follow- 
ing children  have  been  born  to  them:  John  W.;  Claude  C,  who  married 
Annie  Harris;  Mary  Ellen;  Charles  G.,  who  married  Minnie  Parry;  Eliz- 
abeth May;  Bessie  B.;  and  William  Walter,  who  died  young.  The  family 
are  Lutherans. 

John  Walter,  father  of  Mrs.  William  W.  Kaup,  was  bom  June  6,  1829,  in 
France,  came  to  the  United  States  in  young  manhood,  and  first  settled  at 
Tamaqua,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  Later  he  removed  to  Rush  township,  locating 
at  Stone  Tavern.  During  the  Civil  war  he  enlisted  for  service  in  the  Union 
army,  and  his  death,  which  occurred  March  2,  1867,  was  caused  by  exposure 
while  in  the  army.  He  is  buried  at  Tamaqua.  His  wife,  Catherine  (Bladel), 
was  bom  in  Germany,  came  to  America  when  eighteen  years  old,  and  sur- 
vived him  many  years,  dying  at  the  age  of  seventy-three.  They  had  four  .chil- 
dren: Catherine,  Mrs.  Kaup;  Rachel,  Mrs.  Charles  Morgans;  John,  who 
died  when  thirty-seven  years  old ;  and  Margaret,  who  married  Francis  Job,  of 
England.    The  father  of  this  family  was  a  Democrat  in  political  sentiment. 

JAMES  DEIBERT,  a  lifelong  resident  of  North  Manheim  township, 
Schuylkill  county,  recently  deceased,  was  a  citizen  especially  helpful  in  local 
affairs  by  his  efficient  services  on  the  school  board.  He  was  probably  one  of 
the  most  widely  known  men  in  his  part  of  the  county,  where  he  was  engaged 
in  farming  for  many  years  on  land  which  has  been  owned  and  occupied  by 
his  family  since  the  middle  of  the  eighteenth  century. 

Michael  Deiver  (as  his  generation  spelled  the  name),  great-grandfather  of 
James  Deibert,  was  the  founder  of  this  branch  of  the  family  in  Schuylkill 
county.  He  was  born  in  Germany,  and  came  with  his  parents  to  America, 
the  family  settling  in  Bern  township,  Berks  county,  in  the  then  Province  of 
Pennsylvania,  near  Michael's  Church.  There  were  five  children,  three  sons 
and  two  daughters:  Michael,  Christopher,  Wilhelm,  Mrs.  George  Hunt- 
zinger  and  Mrs.  John  Gevert.  When  the  sons  were  grown  they  moved  to 
Manheim  township,  Schuylkill  county,  and  married,  Wilhelm  to  a  daughter  of 
John  Renchler,  from  Bern  township,  Berks  county,  Michael  to  Elizabeth 
Waver.  In  the  year  1744  the  brothers  Wilhelm  and  Michael  bought  in  part- 
nership three  hundred  acres  of  land  in  North  Manheim  township,  at  the  road 
leading  from  Schuylkill  Haven  to  Landingville,  Wilhelm's  part  being  at  the 
location  occupied  by  Edward  Peale  in  1884,  and  Michael's  where  John  Filbert 
lived  at  that  time.  The  third  brother,  Christopher,  went  to  Virginia  in  his 
yotmger  years,  and  the  family  did  not  hear  from  him  afterwards. 

In  the  beginning  Wilhelm  and  Michael  Deiver  had  the  Indians  for  their 
neighbors,  and  were  molested  considerably.  Deer  and  bears  were  plentiful  in 
the  region  at  that  day,  and  as  they  divided  the  meat  with  the  savages  when 
they  shot  any  the  Indians  became  more  friendly.  In  the  pamphlet  published 
in  1884  by  Daniel  Deibert,  a  grandson  of  Wilhelm  Deibert,  we  find  this  para- 
graph: "My  grandfather  said  after  the  Indians  went  away,  some  of  them 
came  back  again  to  rob  them  of  their  planting  fruits.  My  grandfather  and  his 
brother  Michael  had  to  flee  over  the  Blue  mountain  to  their  father's  home. 
They  buried  their  implements  on  the  other  side  of  the  Schuylkill  river,  in 
the  woods,  that  the  Indians  could  not  get  them;  but  when  they  came  back 
Ihey  didn't  find  them  any  more.  And  they  didn't  find  them  till  the  Schuylkill 
canal  was  made,  then  they  dug  them  out  again." 

Michael  Deiver  (according  to  the  same  pamphlet)  had  five  sons  and  three 


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678  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

daughters  (only  two  daughters  are  named,  however),  Henry,  Andrew,  Michael, 
Christian,  John,  Catharine  and  Elizabeth.  Henry  married  Miss  Kriner; 
Andrew,  Miss  Luckenbill;  Michael,  Miss  Luckenbill  (they  had  no  children)  ; 
Christian,  Miss  Miller ;  Catharine,  John  Dewald ;  Elizabeth,  Daniel  Repp.  The 
father,  Michael,  died  on  his  property  in  North  Manheim  township,  and  is 
buried  at  the  Red  Church  in  this  county. 

John  Deibert,  son  of  Michael,  was  born  in  North  Manheim  township,  and 
was  a  farmer  by  occupation.  He  is  buried  in  the  old  cemetery  at  Schuylkill 
Haven.  He  was  twice  married,  the  maiden  name  of  his  first  wife  being 
Renchler,  of  his  second  Wagner.  His  children  were  as  follows:  Daniel, 
who  lived  in  Schuylkill  Haven ;  George ;  Jacob,  who  died  at  Schuylkill  Haven ; 
John,  who  died  at  Schuylkill  Haven ;  Benjamin,  who  died  at  Pottsville ;  Wil- 
liam, who  died  in  the  Upper  Mahantongo  Valley,  Schuylkill  county;  Samuel; 
Hannah,  who  married  John  Humel,  of  Selinsgrove,  Pa.;  and  Christine,  who 
married  Henry  Shelly  and  lived  at  Pottsville. 

George  Deibert,  son  of  John  and  grandson  of  Michael,  bom  at  the  old 
homestead  of  his  parents,  followed  farming  all  his  life.  He  is  buried  in  the 
Union  cemetery.  He  had  many  interesting  experiences  in  the  early  days.  His 
father  owned  a  large  tract  of  land  where  Fishbach  is  now  located  (near 
Pottsville),  then  thickly  wooded.  When  the  timber  was  cut  it  was  floated  down 
the  Schuylkill.  One  day,  while  going  past  what  is  now  known  as  Mount 
Carbcn,  he  was  followed  by  a  wolf,  and  hastened  to  reach  the  river  so  that 
the  animal  might  lose  his  scent  when  he  forded  the  stream.  When  somewhat 
older  he  had  another  exciting  time  while  plowing  on  the  homestead,  on  the 
Second  mountain.  A  deer  ran  out  and  got  into  a  pond,  and  Mr.  Deibert, 
thinking  he  could  kill  it,  went  into  the  water  after  it,  but  the  animal  almost 
drowned  him.  He  also  had  some  adventures  with  panthers.  Mr.  Deibert 
married  Susanna  Reed,  daughter  of  James  Reed,  and  she  lived  to  the  age  of 
seventy-one.  The  following  children  were  born  to  them :  Charles  V.  B.,  of 
Schuylkill  Haven;  Sarah,  who  married  Abraham  Sharadin;  Mahlon,  who 
died  when  nine  years  old;  Amanda,  who  married  Harrison  Berger;  James, 
who  settled  on  the  old  homestead  in  North  Manheim  township ;  Frank ;  George, 
living  at  Landingville ;  Hannah,  who  married  Edward  Schappell;  Elwin, 
living  at  Schuylkill  Haven ;  and  William,  who  died  when  sixteen  years  old. 

James  Deibert,  son  of  George,  above,  was  bom  Oct.  i8,  1847,  on  the 
homestead  near  the  Half  Way  House  in  North  Manheim  township,  and  attended 
the  local  public  schools.  When  fifteen  years  old  he  entered  the  employ  of 
W.  D.  Kline,  at  Landingville,  for  whom  he  clerked  three  months,  receiving 
six  dollars  a  month.  As  his  father  needed  his  assistance  he  returned  home, 
and  thereafter  cultivated  the  Deibert  property,  after  his  marriage  renting 
the  land,  and  purchasing  the  homestead  upon  his  father's  death.  He  had 
eighty-nine  acres  of  valuable  farming  land  situated  along  the  State  road,  near 
Orwigsburg.  He  continued  to  reside  there  after  retiring  from  the  active  work 
of  cultivation,  in  1909,  but  was  preparing  to  remove  to  Orwigsburg  at  the 
time  of  his  death,  and  had  leased  the  property.  There  was  no  more  highly 
respected  citizen  in  the  township.  His  activity  in  the  promotion  of  all  measures 
intended  for  the  betterment  of  the  locality,  his  upright  life  and  well  balanced 
ideas,  were  influences  for  good  these  many  years.  During  the  twelve  years  he 
was  on  the  school  board  he  showed  his  sincere  desire  to  secure  the  best  pos- 
sible advantages  for  his  township  in  the  way  of  educational  facilities,  and 
spared  neither  time  nor  eff^ort  to  fill  his  office  with  the  highest  regard  for  its 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  679 

responsibilities.  He  was  president  of  the  board  several  years,  and  also  acted 
as  treasurer.  Mr.  Deibert  was  a  Democrat  in  politics,  and  a  Lutheran  in 
religious  connection.  His  death  occurred  at  his  home  on  the  farm  Feb.  9, 
191 5,  after  a  few  days'  illness. 

Mr.  Deibert's  wife,  Mary  C.  (Faust),  died  in  1908,  and  is  buried  in  the 
Union  cemetery  at  Schuylkill  Haven.  She  was  a  daughter  of  Daniel  Faust. 
Of  the  children  born  to  this  union  four  survive,  all  married:  Newton  A., 
who  is  a  shoe  manufacturer  at  Orwigsburg,  this  county;  Elizabeth,  wife  of 
William  H.  Brommer,  of  Harrisburg,  Pa.;  Lillie  B.,  wife  of  Milton  Rohrer, 
a  shoe  manufacturer  of  Orwigsburg ;  and  James  R.,  a  draftsman,  and  also 
engaged  in  the  grocery  business  at  Harrisburg. 

JOSEPH  H.  LAUDIG,  of  Ringtown,  is  doing  a  thriving  business  in  that 
borough  and  the  neighboring  territory  as  a  general  carpenter  and  contractor, 
and  has  many  substantial  structures  to  show  for  his  activity  in  the  quarter 
of  a  century  he  has  been  operating  on  his  own  account.  For  thrift  in  busi- 
ness and  honorable  dealings  with  all,  he  is  considered  a  worthy  representative 
of  the  Laudig  family,  which  has  been  established  in  this  region  since  the  time 
of  his  great-grandfather. 

Peter  Laudig,  a  Revolutionary  soldier,  was  bom  Jan.  28,  1760,  and  died 
Aug.  6,  1837.  On  May  16,  1780,  he  married  Catherine  Lantzer,  who  was  born 
in  Philadelphia  June  12,  1760,  and  died  Oct.  6,  1835.  They  are  buried  at 
the  Old  White  Church  near  Ringtown,  Schuylkill  county. 

Jacob  Laudig,  son  of  Peter,  was  bom  Sept.  28,  1786,  and  died  July  17, 
1863.  The  greater  part  of  his  active  life  was  spent  in  Union  township, 
whither  he  moved  from  Middleport,  this  county,  and  he  was  engaged  in  farm- 
ing and  milling,  having  a  tract  of  about  forty-eight  acres  and  a  gristmill  where 
T.  W.  Rumbel  now  lives.  This  mill  and  farm  he  sold  to  John  Maurer  and 
then  bought  the  place  where  W.  H.  Rumbel  is  now  located,  remaining  there 
tmtil  his  death.  He  was  a  Democrat  in  political  faith,  and  his  religious  cori- 
nection  was  with  the  German  Reformed  congregation  of  the  Old  White  Church 
near  Ringtown,  in  whose  cemetery  he  and  his  wife  are  buried.  Mr.  Laudig 
married  Elizabeth  Wetstone,  who  was  bom  Jan.  13,  1794,  and  died  Sept.  26, 
1863.  Their  children  were:  Solomon  married  Susan  Zimmerman;  William 
married  Rebecca  Rumbel;  Frank  died  in  young  manhood;  Jacob  married  a 
Stauffer;  Leah  married  John  Zimmerman. 

Jacob  Laudig,  son  of  Jacob  and  Elizabeth  (Wetstone)  Laudig,  was  bom 
Feb.  15,  1836,  in  Union  township,  where  he  grew  to  manhood.  He  assisted 
his  father  with  the  farm  work  and  remained  with  him  until  his  death,  on  the 
place  now  owned  by  William  H.  Rumbel,  continuing  to  live  at  the  old  home- 
stead until  1880,  when  he  removed  to  Zion  Grove,  in  North  Union  township. 
There  he  purchased  a  tract  of  eighty  acres  (the  farm  now  owned  by  Edward 
Lindermuth),  about  three  acres  of  which  were  in  timber,  and  he  followed  gen- 
eral farming  on  that  land  until  his  death.  Mr.  Laudig  was  an  expert  butcher, 
and  his  services  as  such  were  in  great  demand  among  all  the  farmers  in  this 
section.  In  politics  he  gave  his  support  to  the  Democratic  party,  and  in 
religion  he  clung  to  the  faith  of  the  German  Reformed  denomination,  belong- 
ing to  the  Old  White  Church,  ^near  Ringtown.  He  died  July  17,  1898,  and  is 
buried  at  that  church. 

Mr.  Laudig  married  Rachel  (or  Rebecca)  Stauffer,  who  was  bom  March 
6, 1837,  in  Locust  Valley,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  daughter  of  George  and  Catherine 


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680  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

(Swank)  Stauffer,  and  survives  him,  living  in  Ring^own.  Children  as  follows 
were  bom  to  them:  Joseph  H.;  Benjamin  F.,  born  June  15,  1864,  who  mar- 
ried Elizabeth  R.  Lessig  and  lives  in  Scranton,  Pa. ;  George,  bom  Dec.  2,  1865, 
of  Ringtown,  who  married  Mary  A.  Hom;  Charles,  born  Dec.  3,  1867,  who 
married  Emma  Mummey  and  lives  at  Zion  Grove,  this  county;  Elizabeth  C, 
bom  Jan.  31,  1873,  wife  of  William  Deebel,  of  Ringtown;  and  Rose,  bom  Oct. 
28,  1874,  wife  of  Henry  Reich,  of  Ringtown. 

Joseph  H.  Laudig  was  bom  Aug.  8,  1861,  in  Union  township,  his  birth- 
place being  now  included  in  Ringtown  borough.  He  worked  with  his  father 
on  the  home  place  until  1880,  meantime  receiving  good  educational  advantages 
in  the  public  schools  of  the  township,  and  then  became  a  carpenter's  appren- 
tice with  J.  B.  Kester,  of  Ringtown,  with  whom  he  remained  for  a  period  of 
eight  years.  During  that  time  he  had  obtained  a  comprehensive  knowledge 
of  general  carpenter  work,  bam  and  house  building,  and  he  felt  competent  to 
start  out  on  his  own  account  as  a  contractor.  His  success  has  fully  justified 
.  the  venture.  Much  of  the  most  creditable  constmction  work  in  and  around 
Ringtown  has  been  intmsted'  to  him,  and  he  is  usually  kept  busy  with  his 
contracts  in  that  vicinity.  One  summer  he  worked  at  Shenandoah  for  Mr. 
O'Heam,  lumber  dealer  and  contractor,  and  he  built  a  house  for  his  brother 
in  Scranton.  Personally  he  is  able  to  perform  any  kind  of  carpenter  work, 
being  very  proficient  with  the  tools  of  the  trade  and  competent  to  do  any  of 
the  skilled  labor  necessary  in  the  erection  of  a  building.  His  familiarity  with 
the  practical  end  of  the  business,  combined  with  executive  capacity,  makes 
him  a  shrewd  judge  of  workmen,  and  no  one  in  the  business  hereabouts 
stands  higher  for  reliability  and  responsibility  in  anything  he  undertakes. 
Aifairs  of  local  interest  .have  always  received  their  due  share  of  his  attention. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Ringtown  Fire  Company,  and  was  one  of  its  tmstees 
for  several  years.  He  belongs  to  Washington  Camp  No.  265,  P.  O.  S.  of  A., 
of  Ringtown,  of  which  he  was  formerly  recording  secretary;  and  was  a 
charter  member  of  Ringtown  Lodge,  No.  287,  I.  O.  O.  P.,  of  which  he  is  a 
past  grand,  and  he  was  its  first  secretary.  Mr.  Laudig  is  independent  in 
politics,  supporting  the  candidates  and  measures  he  thinks  best,  r^ardless  of 
party.  In  his  earlier  years  he  was  a  member  of  the  Old  White  Church  (Re- 
formed) near  Ringtown,  where  he  held  the  office  of  deacon  for  nine  years,  but 
he  is  now  a  member  of  the  Reformed  Church  at  Ringtown.  For  some  time  he 
taught  in  the  Sunday  school  at  Zion  Grove,  and  he  has  always  been  a  gener- 
ous contributor  to  religious  enterprises  of  all  kinds. 

Mr.  Laudig  married  Susan  Kersteder,  who  was  born  Oct.  18,  1861 ;  her 
father  and  mother,  Adam  Kersteder  and  Hannah  Long,  were  both  natives  of 
Schiiylkill  county,  bom  in  Mahanoy  Valley.  Seven  children  have  been  bom 
to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Laudig:  Mattie  May,  bom  July  27,  1884,  is  married  to 
Elmer  Kreiger,  and  has  five  children,  Clarence  E.,  Mary  R.,  Roy  A.,  Emily 
M.  and  Joseph  D. ;  Daniel  A.,  bom  Sept.  21,  1886,  married  Carrie  Laudig  and 
has  two  children,  Guy  H.  and  Grace;  Sadie  E.  was  bom  March  30,  1889: 
lames  A.  was  bom  May  31,  1891 ;  Jacob  W.,  bom  Dec.  8,  1893,'  married 
lEva  Home;  Allen  R.  was  bom  July  23,  1896;  Perl  R.  was  bom  Nov.  12, 
1904.  Mrs.  Kreiger,  Daniel,  Sadie  and  James  are  graduates  of  the  Ringtown 
high  school. 

MORRIS  UPDEGRAVE,  proprietor  of  the  'Tower  City  House,"  at 
Tower  City,  Pa.,  was  bom  Dec.  13,  1873,  ^^  Hubley  township,  near  Sacra- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  681 

mento,  Schuylkill  county,  son  of  Samuel  and  Lucinda  (Undercoffler)  Upde- 
grave,  and  a  grandson  of  Jacob  Updegrave. 

United  States  in  search  of  his  fortune,  settling  as  a  pioneer  in  Pine  Valley, 
Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  There  his  affairs  prospered,  he  became  the  owner  of  a 
good  farm,  was  known  as  a  substantial  and  reliable  citizen,  and  passed  all 
his  life  He  died  there,  and  was  buried  at  the  cemetery  at  Sacramento.  Mr. 
Updegrave  married  Catherine  Kimmel,  and  they  became  the  parents  of  the 
following  children:  Henry  K.;  Anetta,  who  married  John  Deibler;  Ceceha, 
who  married  Daniel  Geist;  Catherine,  who  married  John  Pritchard;  Elizabeth, 
who  married  Frank  Stutzmari;  Jacob;  Samuel;  and  Sevilla,  who  married 
Wilson  Geist.  Of  these  children,  Henry  K.  Updegrave  was  connected  with 
the  early  history  of  the  coal  industry  in  the  West  End,  and  was  a  large  con- 
tractor m  the  supplying  of  timber  for  the  mines.  Later  he  became  proprietor 
of  the  'Tower  City  House,"  which  he  conducted  for  a  niunber  of  years.  He 
looked  after  the  land  for  Mr.  Tower  at  a  time  when  the  entire  locality  was 
little  more  than  a  wilderness  and  later  supplied  the  first  timber  for  the  Brook- 
side  colliery.  His  death  occurred  at  Tower  City  when  he  was  well  advanced 
in  years.  Jacob,  son  of  Jacob,  and  brother  of  Henry  K.  Updegrave,  was  a 
miner  and  the  victim  of  one  of  the  early  accidents  in  this  locality,  in  which  his 
back  was  broken.  He  lived  for  nine  years  thereafter,  eventually  passing  away 
at  Tower  City. 

Samuel  Updegrave,  father  of  Morris  Updegrave,  was  in  early  life  em- 
ployed with  his  brother,  I^enry  K.,  and  Henry  Row,  in  driving  team,  hauling 
timber.  He  subsequently  turned  his  attention  to  farming  operations  in  Pine 
Valley,  Hubley  township,  and  in  1874  came  to  Tower  City,  where  he  was 
employed  to  drive  a  team  at  the  mines.  Later  he  was  advanced  to  stable  boss 
at  the  Brookside  colliery  and  held  that  position  until  his  death,  which  occurred 
June  29,  1909.  Mr.  Updegrave  was  well  kijown  in  this  locality  and  was  the 
possessor  of  a  host  of  friends.  'He  married  Lucinda  Undercoffler,  who  died 
in  191 1,  and  both  are  buried  at  Greenwood  cemetery.  Tower  City.  They  had 
the  following  children:  Elmer;  Morris;  Oara,  deceased,  who  was  the  wife 
of  Samuel  Stephens;  Fred;  Cora,  who  is  the  wife  of  Edward  Artz;  Walter; 
Edith,  who  is  the  wife  of  Allen  Schreiner;  Harper;  and  Estella,  who  is  the 
wife  of  S.  Bruggy. 

The  education  of  Morris  Updegrave  was  secured  in  the  public  schools  of 
Tower  City,  and  his  boyhood  was  passed  in  much  the  same  manner  as  that 
of  his  youthful  companions,  who  early  learned  the  lessons  of  industry  and 
thrift,  and  who  were  taught  to  be  self-reliant.  He  was  only  nine  years  of 
age  when  he  began  contributing  to  his  own  support  as  a  slate  picker,  and  one 
year  later  went  inside  to  work,  gradually  becoming  experienced  in  various 
lines.  Eventually  he  became  a  miner,  a  vocation  which  he  followed  until 
reaching  the  age  of  twenty-four  years,  when,  having  accumulated  some  capital, 
he  left  the  mines  and  entered  the  draying  business  by  buying  out  Charles  Mas- 
terson,  at  Tower  City.  For  thirteen  years  Mr.  Updegrave  followed  this 
business  with  a  full  measure  of  success,  and  then  disposed  of  his  interests  to 
Troutman  Brothers  and  removed  to  Atlantic  City,  N.  J.  A  short  time  later 
he  went  ix>  Philadelphia,  where  he  spent  eighteen  months  and  was  employed 
as  a  station  agent  by  the  Rapid  Transit  Company,  returning  to  Tower  City, 
where,  April  13,  1914,  he  took  charge  of  the  "Tower  City  House."  He  has 
continued  to  conduct  this  hotel  with  success,  and  is  very  popular  with  the 


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682  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

traveling  public.  A  solicitous  host,  he  is  eager  to  meet  the  wishes  of  his 
guests,  and  as  a  result  this  hostelry  is  gaining  much  reputation  and  patronage. 

Mr.  Updeg^ve  married  Agnes  Brown,  daughter  of  Samuel  Brown,  and 
they  have  five  children :    Mae,  Allen,  Vivian,  Hazel  and  Dorothy. 

Always  progressive  and  ent^erprising,  Mr.  Updegrave  has  contributed  to 
the  entertainment  facilities  of  this  locality  by  the  erection  of  what  is  known 
as  Palace  Hall,  a  structure  56  by  76  feet,  located  in  the  rear  of  the  **Tower 
City  House,"  which  has  been  fitted  up  with  a  splendid  dance  floor,  with  all 
modem  equipment,  and  accommodations  for  basket-ball  matches  and  other 
entertainments.  It  is  well  lighted  and  heated,  has  a  large  seating  capacity, 
and  being  the  only  structure  of  its  kind  it  is  largely  patronized  by^the  pleasure- 
loving  public.  It  has  been  frequently  the  scene  of  entertainments  given  by 
the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  of  Tower  City,  the  Knights  of 
Pythias  of  Muir,  and  the  Loyal  Order  of  Moose,  of  Lykens,  of  which  orders 
Mr.  Updegrave  is  a  popular  member. 

SHAPPELL  FAMILY.  In  Perry  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  which  until 
1853  was  a  part  of  Windsor  township,  is  a  prominent  family  bearing  the 
name  of  Shappell,  which  is  sometimes  variously  spelled  Schappelle,  Choppelle, 
Schobbel,  Shobel,  Schappel  and  Schappell.  The  original  home  of  the  family 
was  in  France,''  but  through  religious  persecution  its  members  sought  refuge 
in  Germany,  making  their  home  at  Wittenberg.  Among  the  108  passengers 
on  the  good  ship  "Patience,"  which  arrived  at  the  port  of  Philadelphia  Sept. 
^7*  1753*  was  a  Jeremie  Chappelle,  and  one  Jean  Pierre  Chappelle.  The 
kinship  of  these  two  emigrants  is  unknown,  but  it  is  doubted  that  they  were 
relatives.  What  became  of  Jean  Pierre  after  landing  in  the  New  World  is 
unknown.  Jeremias  Schappelle  (as  it  appears  on  the  tombstone)  or  Schobel, 
and  Eberhart  Schoppel,  brothers,  were  residents  in  Windsor  township,  Berks 
Co.,  Pa.,  in  1754  (see  Rupp's  history). 

According  to  the  tombstone  inscription  at  Zion's  Church,  in  Perry 
(formerly  Windsor)  township,  Jeremias  Schappelle  was  bom  in  1715,  and 
he  died  Oct.  15,  1804.  His  wife,  Catherine,  bom  in  1724,  passed  away  June 
8,  1 801.  The  will  of  Jeremiah  Shappel  (sic)  is  on  record  in  the  Berks  county 
courthouse  in  Will  Book  A,  page  505.  It  was  made  Feb.  11,  1803,  and 
probated  Jan.  7,  1805.  At  the  time  the  will  was  made  he  was  a  resident  of 
Windsor  township.  The  following  children  were  mentioned  in  the  will: 
Jacob  (who  was  made  executor  of  his  father's  estate),  Matthias,  Jeremiah, 
Magdalena  and  Catherine.  In  the  cemetery  at  Zion's  Church  is  a  tombstone 
bearing  the  following  inscription:  "Elizabeth  Schappelle,  wife  of  Jeremias, 
formerly  of  Deutschland,  bom  Feb.  16,  1771,  died  July  9,  181 7,  aged  forty- 
six  years,  five  months,  twenty-three  days."  This  probably  refers  to  the  wife 
of  Jeremias  or  Jeremiah,  son  of  Jeremias  (i). 

No  records  of  the  descendants  of  Eberhart  Schoppel  are  in  evidence  at 
Zion's  Union  Church.  He  may  have  left  Windsor  township  after  1744,  in 
which  year  he  hewed  his  name  on  a  stone  now  in  the  southeastern  wall  of  the 
old  graveyard.  Tradition  says  that  the  stones  upon  which  these  names  are 
carved  (one  bears  the  name  of  Jeremias)  were  once  part  of  the  wall  of  the 
first  church.    The  fourth  church  was  in  process  of  construction  in  1908. 

Jacob  Schappell,  son  of  Jeremias,  was  better  known  as  "]oc\iity,''  a  nick- 
name evidently  taken  from  the  German  pronunciation  of  his  name.  He  was 
bom  in  Wittenberg,  Germany,  Feb.  2,  1744,  and  died  Sept.  11,  1826.    As  stated 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  683 

above  he  was  the  executor  of  his  father's  will  in  1805.  His  wife,  Susanna, 
was  bom  Feb.  2,  1751,  and  died  July  24,  1828.  They  are  buried  at  Zion's 
Church.  Jeremias,  Eberhart  and  Jockey  Schappell  were  founders  of  the  orig- 
inal Zion's  Church.  Tradition  says  Jacob  and  Susanna  had  a  large  family, 
some  of  their  children,  however,  dying  in  infancy  and  childhood.  Of  these 
may  be  mentioned  those  of  wlu)m  there  is  record :  Peter,  bom  April  19,  1770; 
Col.  Jeremiah,  bom  March  20,  1774;  Daniel,  mentioned  below;  and  Hannah, 
who  married  Georg  Hoffman,  a  farmer  of  Perry  township.  There  is  a 
valley  in  Perry  township  known  as  Schappell's  Dale,  because  of  the  many 
Shappells  living  there. 

Daniel  Shappell  was  born  in  Longswamp,  Berks  county,  and  followed  farm- 
ing all  of  his  active  life.  He  came  to  Schuylkill  county  at  an  early  date,  set- 
tling between  Schuylkill  Haven  and  Orwigsburg,  where  he  purchased  500  acres 
of  land.  He  was  a  taxable  resident  of  North  Manheim  township  in  1790, 
where  he  died,  and  is  buried  in  the  old  cemetery  at  Schuylkill  Haven.  His 
children  were:  John,  Charles,  Daniel,  Jacob,  Mrs.  Tobias,  Mrs.  Dengler, 
Mrs.  Potts,  Mrs.  Roudenbush,  Mrs.  Miller,  Mrs.  Krebs  and  Mrs.  Waitman. 

John  Shappell  was  bom  on  the  homestead  and  was  reared  a  farmer.  He 
came  into  possession  of  136  acres  of  the  homestead,  which  he  continued  to  cul- 
tivate until  his  death.  For  a  short  time  he  followed  the  occupation  of  boat- 
builder  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  also  making  several  trips  down  the  canal.  He  died 
at  the  age  of  seventy-nine,  his  wife,  Caroline  Bowen,  passing  to  rest  at  the 
age  of  seventy-two  years.  They  are  interred  in  the  Union  cemetery  at  Schuyl- 
kill Haven.  Mr.  Shappell  was  a  man  of  high  repute  throughout  the  country- 
side and  his  death  was  regretted  by  all  with  whom  he  had  intercourse  in  life. 
His  children  were :  Edwin,  living  in  Cressona ;  James,  of  Schuylkill  Haven ; 
Hannah,  wife  of  Elijah  Boyer ;  Albert,  living  in  Pottsville ;  John,  who  resides 
in  Omaha,  Nebr. ;  Daniel;  Charles,  who  died  in  Cressona;  Andrew  J.;  and  a 
son  who  died  in  infancy. 

Andrew  J.  Shappell  was  bom  on  the  homestead  in  North  Manheim 
township  Feb.  12,  1859,' has  followed  farming  all  of  his  life,  and  is  now  half 
owner  of  his  father's  homestead.  He  was  married  to  Ella  Weaver,  daughter 
of  Charles  Weaver,  and  to  this  union  were  bom  children  as  follows :  Luther, 
Helen,  Florence,  Ida,  Lester,  Claude  (deceased),  and  a  daughter  who  died  in 
infancy. 

Daniel  Shappell  was  bom  on  the  homestead  in  North  Manheim  town- 
ship Dec.  19,  1854.  He  is  now  the  possessor  of  half  of  his  father's  homestead 
of  136  acres,  and  in  partnership  with  his  brother  Andrew  J.  carries  on  a 
general  farming  and  tmcking  business  there,  disposing  of  his  produce  in  the 
Pottsville  and  Schuylkill  Haven  markets.  He  married  Anna  Bubeck,  daughter 
of  John  Bubeck,  and  their  children  are:  Lottie,  wife  of  Morris  Becker; 
Clair;  Daniel,  Jr.;  and  Howard  and  Bird  D.,  both  deceased. 

TIMOTHY  F.  BERNEY,  postmaster  at  Tower  City,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa., 
was  bom  at  Minersville,  this  county,  Oct.  25,  1879,  son  of  Patrick  Bemey. 
His  father,  who  resides  at  Tower  City,  has  for  many  years  been  connected 
with  the  Brookside  colliery,  and  is  adjudged  one  of  the  valued  and  reliable 
foremen  in  the  employ  of  the  Reading  Company. 

Timothy  F.  Bemey  was  six  years  of  age  when  brought  by  his  parents  to 
Tower  City,  and  here  his  education  was  secured  in  the  public  schools.  He 
was  still  a  lad  when  he  took  employment  at  the  West  Brookside  colliery,  and 


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684  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

continued  to  work  there  for  about  two  years,  or  until  he  learned  the  art  of 
telegraphy  at  the  Brookside  station  of  the  Reading  railroad.  This  he  followed 
as  a  vocation  for  one  year,  and  was  then  promoted  to  a  clerical  position  in 
the  Brookside  office  of  the  company,  having  since  that  time  been  advanced 
to  a  place  of  importance.  He  is  a  Democrat  in  politics  and  has  been  prominent 
in  the  councils  of  his  party  in  this  locality.  As  a  public  servant  he  has  served 
very  satisfactorily  in  the  capacities  of  member  of  the  board  of  health,  a  posi- 
tion which  he  held  for  five  years,  and  as  auditor  of  Tower  City  borough,  and 
on  June  27,  19 13,  was  appointed  postmaster  at  Tower  City  borough  by  Presi- 
dent Woondrow  Wilson.  He  has  worked  faithfully  in  an  endeavor  to  better 
the  service  from  his  office,  and  has  proved  a  most  popular  official  with  the 
people  there.  Formerly  he  was  a  director  and  secretary  of  the  Franklin  Build- 
ing and  Loan  Association  of  Tower  City.  His  religious  connection  is  with  the 
Catholic  Church,  and  at  present  he  is  a  director  of  the  Knights  of  Saint  George, 
of  Tower  City,  as  well  as  president  of  the  local  organization  of  the  A,  O. 
H.  In  business,  official  and  fraternal  circles  he  is  one  of  the  most  popular 
young  men  of  Tower  City. 

Mr.  Bemey  married  Cecilia  A.  McDonald,  a  daughter  of  Archibald  F. 
McDonald,  of  St.  Qair,  Pa.,  and  they  have  one  daughter,  Florence  Rita. 

IVOR  DAVID  FENTON,  M.  D.,  is  one  of  the  younger  physicians  at 
Mahanoy  City,  but  nevertheless  a  trustworthy  member  of  the  profession,  and 
personally  he  bears  the  enviable  refutation  which  has  become  attached  to  the 
name  of  Fenton  in  this  part  of  Schuylkill  county.  His  father,  Patrick  C. 
Fenton,  has  attained  by  his  own  efforts  an  honored  position  in  mining  circles. 
His  grandparents  were  James  and  Mary  (Phillips)  Fenton,  natives  of  Scotland 
and  Wales,  respectively,  who  lived  and  died  in  the  latter  country.  James 
Fenton  passed  away  in  1871,  aged  sixty-eight  years,  his  widow  in  1904,  at 
the  age  of  eighty-six. 

Patrick  C.  Fenton  was  bom  Jan.  3,  i860,  in  Glamorganshire,  Wales,  and 
was  reared  in  his  native  country.  His  early  educational  opportunities  were 
meagre,  for  he  began  work  in  the  mines  when  a  boy,  but  he  was  ambitious 
and  attended  night  school,  both  in  Wales  and  after  coming  to  this  country. 
In  1878  he  turned  to  America  to  improve  his  forttmes.  After  landing  he  pro- 
ceeded directly  to  Shenandoah,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  arriving  there  in  Septem- 
ber, and  immediately  sought  work  at  the  mines.  He  was  employed  at 
Shenandoah  for  almost  a  quarter  of  a  century,  during  which  time  he  won 
several  promotions  on  his  merits.  For  ten  years  he  was  a  fire  boss,  inside  fore- 
man six  years,  and  assistant  superintendent  two  years.  When  he  had  been  in 
this  country  eighteen  years  he  made  a  visit  to  his  old  home  in  Wales,  spending 
two  and  a  half  months  on  the  trip.  Returning  to  Shenandoah  he  resumed  work 
as  inside  foreman  of  the  Packer  colliery.  No.  3,  where  he  continued  until 
1903,  since  when  he  has  been  engaged  as  a  mine  inspector.  The  duties  of  the 
mine  inspectors  are  arduous  and  highly  important  to  operators  as  well  as 
employes.  The  company  is  divided  into  four  districts,  the  Tenth,  Eleventh, 
Twelfth  and  Thirteenth  Anthracite  districts,  each  in  charge  of  an  inspector, 
and  Mr.  Fenton  has  held  the  position  in  the  Eleventh  district  (known  as 
the  Mahanoy  district)  continuously  since  first  chosen,  now  serving  his  fifth 
term.  Though  there  has  been  official  mine  inspection  since  1870,  the  Act  of 
Assembly  under  which  the  Department  of  Mines,  as  at  present  constituted, 
was  established  was  not  approved  until  April  14,  1903.     The  office  of  mine 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  685 

inspector  is  elective,  the  term  three  years,  the  responsibility  great,  the  require- 
ments very  exacting.  Supplementing  his  practical  experience,  Mr.  Fenton  in 
order  to  qualify  thoroughly  took  the  full  correspondence  course  in  mining  of 
the  International  Correspondence  Schools,  Scranton,  Pa.,  familiarizing  him- 
self with  the  theory  of  many  details.  At  the  general  election  in  1903  he  was 
the  successful  candidate  in  the  Eleventh  district,  where  his  ability  was  well 
known,  and  so  well  satisfied  were  the  people  with  his  performance  of  the 
duties  intrusted  to  him  that  he  was  reelected  without  opposition  in  1906.  He 
has  been  the  choice  of  the  voters  at  each  election  smce.  There  are  nine 
collieries  in  the  district,  with  about  ten  thousand  employes,  whose  safety  to  a 
large  extent  is  dependent  upon  the  thoroughness  of  the  inspector.  He  keeps 
a  record  of  the  ventilation — the  condition  of  the  mines  with  relation  to  the 
presence  of  gas  and  the  methods  employed  to  obviate  its  effects,  the  number 
of  cubic  feet  of  air  supplied  to  each  man,  and  the  means  employed  to  supply 
it;  the  extension  of  tunnels;  abandonment  of  workings;  installation  of  each 
new  machine,  and  the  reason  for  every  change.  All  new  workings  are  prose- 
cuted under  his  direct  supervision,  and  he  must  keep  track  of  all  the  details 
of  the  working  of  every  mine  in  his  district,  above  and  below  ground.  The 
information  must  all  be  embodied  in  his  annual  report  to  the  chief  of  the  De- 
partment of  Mines  of  Pennsylvania.  When  we  state  that  Mr.  Fenton  has 
passed  several  examinations  with  high  marks,  it  is  only  doing  justice  to  his 
comprehensive  knowledge  of  mines  and  mining  in  the  anthracite  region  and 
his  conscientious  interpretation  of  duty.  His  genial  nature  has  made  him 
many  friends.  He  has  his  official  headquarters  on  East  Centre  street,  Mahanoy 
City,  at  his  handsome  home.  He  is  also  president  of  the  Mahanoy-Mecholin 
Coal  Company,  whose  mines  are  in  Harrison  county,  Ohio. 

On  April  20,  1882,  Mr.  Fenton  married  Elizabeth  Thomas,  daughter  of 
John  T.  and  Mary  Ann  Thomas,  then  living  at  Shenandoah.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Thomas  are  natives  of  Glamorganshire,  Wales.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Fenton  have 
had  five  children:  Mary  graduated  from  high  school  and  taught  school  in 
Mahanoy  City  before  her  marriage  to  Charles  Richards,  now  division  super- 
intendent of  the  mines  at  Mahanoy  City ;  Ivor  David  is  next  in  the  family ; 
Edith,  a  graduate  of  the  Mahanoy  City  high  school,  lives  at  home ;  Caroline  is 
attending  high  school;  John  is  also  at  school.  The.  family  are  members  of 
the  Welsh  Congregational  Church.  Politically  he  is  a  Republican,  and  has 
always  been  active  in  party  affairs  and  a  leader  in  the  locality.  He  is  on 
the  library  committee  which  selects  the  public  school  books.  Fraternally  he 
is  connected  with  the  Ivorites,  B.  P.  O.  Elks  and  Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles. 
Mr.  Fenton  is  fond  of  music  and  a  good  singer,  and  has  been  active  in  musical 
circles  for  many  years.  His  numerous  and  various  associations  have  brought 
him  into  contact  with  a  large  number  of  his  fellow  citizens,  and  he  commands 
their  respectful  esteem  by  his  many  admirable  qualities.  He  is  a  self-made 
man,  and  has  gained  his  high  standing  by  the  most  commendable  methods. 

Ivor  David  Fenton  was  bom  Aug.  3,  1889,  at  Buck  Mountain,  Schuyl- 
kill county.  He  received  his  literary  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
Mahanoy  Qty  and  Bucknell  University,  Lewisburg,  Pa.,  graduating  from  the 
academy  there  and  spending  one  year  in  the  college.  He  then  matriculated 
at  Jefferson  Medical  College,  Philadelphia,  and  after  his  graduation  in  1^12 
was  stationed  for  eighteen  months  in  the  Fountain  Springs  hospital  at  Ash- 
land, Pa.,  where  he  had  many  advantages  for  supplementing  his  college  work 
with  actual  experience.    Since  entering  upon  independent  practice  he  has  been 


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686  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

established  at  Mahanoy  City,  where  he  is  building  up  a  creditable  patronage. 
His  success  is  the  reward  of  devoted  labor,  and  well  deserved.  Dr.  Fenton  is 
a  Mason,  belonging  to  Mahanoy  City  Lodge,  No.  357,  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  a 
member  of  the  B.  P.  O.  Elks  and  Improved 'Order  of  Red  Men.  His  religious 
connection  is  with  the  Welsh  Congregational  Church. 

JAMES  M.  SHELLHAMMER,  of  Pottsville,  at  present  a  member  of  the 
city  council,  was  engaged  in  the  confectionery  trade  there  throughout  his 
business  career.  He  attained  a  substantial  position  entirely  through  his  own 
efforts,  having  begun  life  a  poor  boy,  but  he  had  the  ambition  and  determination 
necessary  to  make  headway  against  obstacles,  and  his  success  was  well  earned. 
Thus  he  merits  the  confidence  which  his  fellow  citizens  have  placed  in  him, 
and  which  he  has  never  betrayed  either  in  his  performance  of  public  duties 
or  discharge  of  any  of  the  obligations  of  daily  life. 

The  Shellhammers  are  of  German  origin,  Isaac  Shellhammer,  grandfather 
of  James  M.,  having  been  born  in  Germany.  When  he  came  to  America  he 
established  his  home  in  Schuylkill,  where  he  lived  and  died.  His  children  were 
Benneville,  Jared,  Samuel  H.  and  Mary  (Mrs.  Jonas  Rerig). 

Samuel  H.  Shellhammer  was  born  at  West  Penn,  Schuylkill  county,  and 
spent  all  his  life  in  the  county.  In  early  life  he  did  farm  work,  and  after- 
wards became  a  mine  worker,  acting  as  inside  and  outside  boss  at  the  Myers- 
ville  colliery  (owned  by  Henry  Myers),  near  Mahanoy  City,  where  he  was 
employed  for  a  period  of  seventeen  years.  For  about  four  years  after  giving 
up  this  work  he  was  on  a  farm  in  the  same  vicinity,  at  Locust  Valley,  from 
there  moving  to  the  Daniel  Hummel  farm,  near  Orwigsburg.  He  remained 
on  that  property  until  his  death,  which  occurred  there  in  1887.  M^-  Shell- 
hammer  is  buried  at  McKeansburg,  this  county,  near  Orwigsburg.  He  married 
Priscilla  Correll,  of  West  Penn,  this  county,  who  survived  him,  dying  in  1889. 
They  had  the  following  family :  Charles,  who  is  living  at  Bowraansville,  Pa. ; 
Mary,  Mrs.  William  Mills;  James  M. ;  Clara  and  Elizabeth,  both  of  whom  died 
young;  Joseph,* living  at  Port  Carbon,  Pa.;  Samuel,  a  resident  of  Schuylkill 
county;  and  Elizabeth  (2),  who  married  Emerson  Trout  and  (second)  Joseph 
Mengle. 

James  M.  Shellhammer  was  born  Oct.  31,  i860,  in  Schuylkill  county,  near 
the  Berks  county  line.  He  was  reared  on  a  farm.  His  educational  advantages 
were  limited,  as  he  was  only  a  boy  of  eight  years  when  he  commenced  picking 
slate  at  a  breaker.  He  was  employed  about  the  mines  at  that  and  other  work 
until  sixteen  years  old,  after  which  he  farmed  with  his  father  for  two  years. 
He  then  came  to  Pottsville,  where  he  feamed  the  candy  business  with-  Henry 
Loechel,  with  whom  he  continued  for  about  nine  years,  until  ready  to  go  into 
the  business  for  himself.  He  was  located  at  No.  15  North  Centre  street,  and 
worked  up  a  profitable  trade  by  honest  methods  and  satisfactory  goods.  Dur- 
ing the  fifteen  years  he  carried  on  the  business  Mr.  Shellhammer  made  a 
reputation  for  reliability  which  has  evidently  gained  him  a  permanent  place 
in  the  regard  of  his  townsmen.  He  retired  in  1905,  and  has  enjoyed  thor- 
oughly the  leisure  which  his  release  from  business  allows,  taking  a  leading 
part  in  the  social  organizations  of  the  city  and  devoting  some  of  his  time  to 
the  public  service.  In  1910  he  was  elected  to  the  city  council,  and  in  Nov^^m- 
ber,  1913,  was  reelected,  with  the  largest  vote  given  to  any  candidate  for  the 
office  on  that  occasion.  As  there  was  a  hard  contest  in  1913,  this  indorsement 
of  his  good  work  was  especially  creditable.    Though  a  Republican  in  principle, 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  687 

Mr.  Shellhammer  votes  independently,  supporting  the  men  he  deems  best 
fitted  for  the  places  to  be  filled. 

Socially  Mr.  Shellhammer  holds  membership  in  the  I.  O.  O.  F.  (Lily  of 
the  Valley  Lodge),  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  (Washington  Camp  No.  36),  K.  G.  E., 
Red  Men,  Heptasophs  and  B.  P.  O.  Elks  (Lodge  No.  207),  all  of  Pottsville; 
in  the  Ridgley  Protective  Association  and  Preferred  Accidental.  His  religious 
connection  is  with  the  English  Lutheran  Church. 

On  Sept.  I,  1887,  Mr.  Shellhammer  married  Minnie  H.  Lord,  daughter  of 
Henry  Lord.  They  have  no  children.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Shellhammer  occupy  the 
handsome  residence  at  the  corner  of  Jackson  and  Greenwood  avenues,  on 
Greenwood  Hill,  which  he  built  at  the  time  of  his  retirement  from  business. 
The  lot  is  no  by  160  feet  in  dimensions,  and  beautifully  situated,  affording  a 
fine  view  which  adds  greatly  to  the  attractions  of  this  beautiful  home. 

Elijah  Lord,  Mrs.  Shellhammer's  grandfather,  was  a  pioneer  settler  in 
Pottsville,  and  died  in  the  borough.  He  is  buried  in  the  Presbyterian  ceme- 
tery. His  children  were:  Seth,  Charles,  Peggin,  Henry,  Jeremiah,  Isaac, 
William  and  Frank,  all  of  whom  lived  and  died  at  Pottsville. 

Henry  Lord,  father  of  Mrs.  Shellhammer,  was  bom  Dec.  23,  1819,  at 
Pottsville,  and  passed  all  his  life  there,  dying  Feb.  7,  1889,  as  the  result  of 
injuries  received  in  an  accident.  He  was  a  carpenter,  and  followed  contract- 
ing to  the  end  of  his  days.  His  first  wife,  Ann  (Williams),  born  Dec.  7,  1822, 
died  Nov.  7,  1855,  leaving  four  children:  William,  who  was  killed  at  the 
battle  of  Gettysburg;  Susan,  who  married  Charles  Seaman,  a  veteran  of  the 
Civil  war ;  Ellen,  wife  of  Joseph  R.  Sowers ;  and  Albert,  now  living  at  Shamo- 
kin.  Pa.  Mr.  Lord  subsequently  married  (second)  Lucretia  Hagar,  of  Orwigs- 
burg.  Pa.,  born  Jan.  15,  1834,  daughter  of  Peter  Hagar.  She  survived  him  a 
year,  dying  March  19,  1890.  To  this  union  also  were  born  four  children: 
Minnie  H.,  Mrs.  James  M.  Shellhammer;  Carrie,  wife  of  Edward  Boyer; 
Lulu,  Mrs.  Charles  Hummel ;  and  Hagar,  who  married  Emma  Brennaman. 

WILLIAM  G.  STITZER,  proprietor  of  Stitzer's  Cafe  at  Schuylkill  Haven, 
was  bom  in  that  borough  May  27,  1866,  and  is  a  son  of  William  F.  Stitzer. 
The  family  is  of  German  ancestry. 

David  Stitzer,  the  first  of  the  family  on  record  in  America,  was  bom 
March  12,  1750,  in  Nova  Scotia,  whence  he  came  to  Philadelphia.  He  served 
in  the  Revolutionary  war  and  at  its  close  moved  to  Reading,  Berks  Co.,  Pa. 
His  wife,  Barbara  Ann  Elizabeth  (Pafenhouser),  was  a  native  of  Nova 
Scotia,  bom  March  10,  1754,  and  came  to  Philadelphia  in  1757.  Among  the 
children  of  this  couple,  was  John  D.,  the  grandfather  of  William  G.  Stitzer. 

John  D.  Stitzer  was  bom  at  Reading,  April  18,  1799,  and  learned  the  trade 
of  shoemaker.  For  a  time  he  lived  at  Rehrersburg,  Berks  county,  removing 
thence  in  1844  to  Schuylkill  Haven,  where  he  followed  his  trade  for  a  num- 
ber of  years.  He  died  at  Mahanoy  City,  June  27,  1879,  aged  eighty  years. 
He  was  originally  a  Whig,  but  became  a  Republican  after  the  ^formation  of 
that  party,  although  he  took  no  active  part  in  politics.  He  was  a  member  of 
the  Lutheran  Church.  On  Sept.  22,  1822,  Mr.  Stitzer  was  married  by  Rev. 
Mr.  Muhlenberg,  of  Reading,  to  Sarah  Hockaman,  who  was  born  Jan.  29, 
1806,  in  Tulpehocken,  Berks  county,  and  died  Sept.  18,  1884,  at  Minersville, 
Schuylkill  county.  Her  father,  Henry  Hockaman,  of  Stouchsburg,  Berks 
county,  was  a  soldier  in  the  war  of  1812,  and  died  in  1833  at  the  age  of 
seventy-eight.     Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stitzer  were  the  parents  of  thirteen  children: 


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688  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

George  W.,  born  Nov.  17,  1823,  at  Reamstown,  Lancaster  county,  died  Oct. 
28,  1901 ;  Amelia  E.,  born  Nov.  19,  1825,  married  Morton  Swartz,  and  died 
Jan.  6,  1906;  Mary,  bom  Feb.  28,  1827,  married  Anthony  Lerch,  and  died  in 
Ohio,  June  14,  1904;  Harriet  S.,  bom  Oct.  31,  1828,  died  unmarried,  April 
6,  1847;  Sarah  Frances,  bom  Jan.  21,  1831,  married  En|^elbert  Geiger,  and 
died  Oct.  14,  1902;  John  Andrew,  bom  Feb.  i,  1833,  died  June  14,  i860; 
William  Foster  was  bom  Jan.  2,  1835;  a  daughter,  bom  Feb.  6,  1837,  died  in 
infancy;  Ann  Delilah,  bom  April  19,  1838,  lives  in  the  South;  Francis  A., 
born  Aug.  29,  1840,  at  Rehrersburg,  became  a  private  in  the  Union  army 
April  17,  1861,  and  served  throughout  the  war,  being  mustered  out  as  a  major 
July  27,  1865  (he  served  as  deputy  collector  of  internal  revenue  at  Easton,  Pa., 
for  fifteen  years,  and  Feb.  20,  1886,  removed  to  Cheyenne,  Wyo.,  becoming 
active  in  business  and  military  circles  in  that  State,  and  is  at  present  servii^f 
as  mayor  of  Laramie)  ;  David  Henry,  bom  June  7,  1843,  served  throujghout  the 
Civil  war,  afterwards  had  charge  of  the  Gordon  Plane  in  Schuylkill  county 
for  a  time,  and  then  removed  to  Kansas  and  engaged  in  farming,  dying  in 
that  State  Sept.  17,  191 1 ;  Catherine  E.,  bom  Sept.  25,  1845,  married  Solomon 
HoflFas  and  is  living  in  the  South;  Samuel,  bom  E^.  21,  1847,  di^d  Dec- 
6,  1900. 

William  Foster  Stitzer  was  bom  at  Rehrersburg,  Berks  county,  and 
attended  the  common  schools  there.  When  he  was  but  nine  years  of  age  he 
became  driver  of  a  towing  team  on  the  Schuylkill  canal,  following  that  line 
of  work  for  the  next  twenty-three  years,  becoming  a  captain  in  1855.  His 
boats  plied  between  Schuylkill  Haven  and  New  York  City.  In  1868  Mr. 
Stitzer  was  elected  constable  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  served  thereafter  for 
twenty-four  consecutive  years,  until  he  resigned.  In  1869  he  became 
borough  tax  collector,  discharging  his  duties  with  such  ability  as  to  be  chosen 
tax  collector  of  North  Manheim  township  three  times  and  of  Port  Qinton 
once.  In  1878  he  collected  $10,000  in  Shenandoah,  and  he  attained  the  repu- 
tation of  an  expert  collector  of  public  money.  He  also  followed  auctioneer- 
ing and  real  estate  selling,  for  eighteen  years  being  special  officer  for  the 
Reading  Railway  Company,  part  of  the  time  being  active  in  the  prosecution 
of  the  **Molly  Maguires,"  a  dangerous  business  in  those  times.  On  Feb.  9, 
1892,  Mr.  Stitzer  became  proprietor  of  a  hotel  and  restaurant — Stitzer  s 
Cafe — ^which  soon  developed  into  a  popular  place  under  his  management. 
In  1904  he  sold  out  to  his  son  William  G.  and  retired. 

In  1858  William  F.  Stitzer  was  married  to  Emma  Hammas,  daughter  of 
the  late  John  Hammas,  of  Oley,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  afterwards  of  Pottsville, 
where  he  died.  To  this  marriage  have  been  bom  eleven  children,  viz.: 
Charles  A.,  bom  Jan.  11,  1859,  a  dmggist,  living  in  Nebraska,  married  Grace 
Traver;  Horace  E.,  bom  June  i,  i^,  a  saddler,  is  residing  in  Nebraska? 
Sarah,  bom  March  7,  1869,  died  at  the  age  of  fourteen ;  Annie  E.,  bom  Sept. 
21,  1863,  married  Benjamin  Kline,  of  Philadelphia;  a  daughter,  bom  June 
23,  1865,  died  in  infancy;  William  G.  is  mentioned  below;  Katie  M.,  bom 
Oct.  24,  1867,  married  Lewis  A.  Graeff,  of  Pottsville;  Emma  R.,  bom 
April  14,  1870,  died  in  infancy;  Mrs.  Frank  Heiser,  bom  Nov.  14,  1871, 
died  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  leaving  three  children ;  Ella  L.,  bom  July  8,  1874, 
is  a  deaconess  at  the  Lutheran  Mother  House  at  Baltimore,  Md. ;  Carrie, 
bom  Jan.  18,  1876,  is  at  home;  Garfield  J.  A.  was  bom  March  4,  1881. 

William  F.  Stitzer  has  long  been  a  member  of  the  Lutheran  Church.    He 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  689 

has  been  a  lifelong  Republican,  and  has  taken  much  interest  in  local  politics. 
He  enlisted  for  the  Union  cause  July  4,  1863,  in  Company  I,  Thirty-ninth 
R^ment,  was  honorably  discharged  in  August  of  that  year,  and  is  a  member 
of  Hehns  Post,  No.  26,  G.  A.  R.,  of  Schuylkill  Haven. 

William  G.  Stitzer  attended  public  scHool  in  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  began 
his  business  career  by  clerking  in  the  hardware  store  of  J.  F.  Thompson  of 
that  town.  At  the  age  of  sixteen  he  went  to  Long  Tree  or  Central  City,. 
Nebr.,  where  he  spent  five  years  as  a  drug  clerk  and  five  years  as  a  clerk  in 
a  hardware  store.  Returning  to  Schuylkill  Haven  he  worked  with  his  father 
for  three  and  a  half  years,  going  then  to  Pottsville  to  work  for  Benjamin 
Zimmerman  for  a  time,  and  subsequently  for  six  years  with  Joseph  Klitch. 
In  1904  he  bought  the  cafe  in  Schuylkill  Haven  established  by  his  father 
and  conducted  it  at  the  old  stand  for  three  and  a  half  years.  He  next  pur- 
chased the  "Union  House,"  which  he  operated  for  a  year,  and  then  in 
November,  19 12,  bought  the  Huntzinger  property  on  Main  street,  which  is  a 
fine  location  for  his  business.  Here  he  has  developed  a  large  and  lucrative 
trade.  Mr.  Stitzer  is  a  member  of  the  Retail  Liquor  Dealers'  Association 
of  the  State  and  county,  and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Schuylkill  Haven  Hose 
Company. 

William  G.  Stitzer  was  married  Nov.  3,  1897,  to  Sarah  A.  Leitzel,  daugh- 
ter of  M.  E.  and  Elizabeth  (Weiser)  Leitzel,  the  latter  a  direct  descendant 
of  Conrad  Weiser,  one  of  the  early  settlers  of  the  State  of  Pennsylvania. 
To  this  couple  has  been  bom  one  daughter,  Marion  Leitzel,  bom  at  Pottsville 
May  23,  1901. 

CAPT.  HANS  C.  CHRISTESON,  deceased,  who  was  for  many  years  one 
of  the  leading  men  of  his  part  of  Schuylkill  county,  was  bom  in  Denmark 
March  13,  1825.  He  came  of  a  sea- faring  family,  and  was  brought  up  on  a 
vessel,  so  that  he  was  familiar  with  his  calling  from  childhood.  For  many 
years  he  followed  the  sea,  rising  to  be  captain,  and  became  the  owner  of  a  ves- 
sel that  carried  merchandise  between  San  Francisco  and  China  ports,  and 
between  New  York  and  South  American  ports,  and  also  made  several  voyages 
round  the  world.  When  the  gold  excitement  was  at  its  height,  in  1849,  Cap- 
tain Christeson  went  to  Calif omia,  and  for  several  years  thereafter  was  en- 
gaged in  prospecting.  Until  after  his  marriage  he  followed  the  sed,  and  then 
spent  some  time  in  New  York  City.  Subsequently  he  came  to  Pennsylvania, 
and  with  Charles  E.  Molly  embarked  in  general  merchandising  at  Pine  Grove. 
He  was  also  interested  in  a  furnace  at  this  point,  and  became  a  man  of  large 
affairs.  After  disposing  of  his  mercantile  interests  Captain  Christeson  went 
to  Mifflin,  now  Suedberg,  where  he  bought  a  large  tract  of  land,  and  opened 
a  general  store.  He  also  conducted  a  hotel,  and  took  an  active  part  in  hav- 
ing the  Lebanon  &  Tremont  branch  of  the  Pennsylvania  railroad  built  through 
this  section  of  the  county.  Not  only  did  he  secure  a  post  office  for  the  station, 
but  served  as  postmaster  until  his  death,  on  Jan.  26,  1878.  The  name  of  the 
post  office  was  changed  from  Mifflin,  as  it  was  originally  known,  to  Suedberg 
in  1882. 

Captain  Christeson  was  married  to  Louisa  Wies,  of  New  York  City,  who 
was  bom  in  Alsace-Lorraine,  France,  Nov.  24,  1836,  and  died  at  Suedberg, 
Pa.,  Feb.  3,  1912.  She  succeeded  her  husband  in  the  post  office,  and  continued 
to  operate  his  other  lines  of  business,  being  a  woman  of  unusual  capability. 


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690  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

The  following  children  were  born  to  this  couple :  Charles,  who  is  a  traveling 
salesman  living  at  Annville,  Lebanon  Co.,  Pa.,  was  at  one  time  postmaster  at 
Suedberg;  George  lives  at  St.  Louis;  Louisa,  who  spends  a  portion  of  her  time 
in  the  old  homestead  at  Suedberg,  was  appointed  postmistress  of  the  post 
office  at  this  point  April  i,  191 5;  six  other  children  are  deceased. 

Captain  Christeson  was  a  member  of  the  Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fel- 
lows. In  religious  faith  he  was  a  Lutheran,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  buried  in 
the  Lutheran  cemetery  at  Pine  Grove.  Few  people  of  their  day  stood  any 
higher  in  public  esteem  than  these  two,  and  they  are  remembered  with  affec- 
tionate reverence  by  those  who  had  the  honor  of  their  acquaintance. 

SAMUEL  OHI-  ranks  among  the  progressive  farmers  in  Rush  township, 
where  he  is  operating  a  valuable  farm  of  150  acres.  He  was  born  in  West 
Penn  township,  Schuylkill  county,  and  the  family  has  long  been  established 
in  this  section,  his  grandfather,  Samuel  Ohl,  having  lived  at  Lizard  Creek,  near 
the  border  line  of  Schuylkill  and  Carbon  counties.  He  followed  farming,  and 
died  there. 

John  Ohl,  son  of  Samuel  Ohl,  lived  for  a  number  of  years  in  West  Penn 
township,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  was  engaged  at  farming  and  carpenter 
work.  He  afterwards  moved  to  Ohio,  where  he  died.  To  his  marriage  with 
Sarah  Behler  were  bom  the  following  children :  Christina,  who  lives  in  Ohio ; 
Moses,  living  in  Berks  county,  Pa. ;  Samuel ;  Charles ;  Rosie ;  and  Elizabeth, 
wife  of  William  Balliett,  living  in  Ohio. 

Samuel  Ohl,  son  of  John  and  Sarah  (Behler)  Ohl,  was  bom  in  1857,  and 
grew  to  manhood  in  his  native  township,  becoming  fahiiliar  with  agricultural 
work  as  his  father's  assistant  on  the  home  place.  When  twenty  years  old  he 
married  and  went  out  to  Ohio,  where  he  remained  for  a  time,  returning  to 
Schuylkill  county  and  locating  in  Tamaqua,  in  which  borough  he  resided  for 
eight  years.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  moved  to  Rush  township,  where  he 
had  bought  a  farm  of  150  acres  from  Schmit  &  Campion,  and  he  has  since 
been  engaged  in  general  farming.  He  is  favorably  known  among  his  neighbors, 
who  appreciate  his  substantial  qualities  and  the  enterprise  he  has  shown  in 
developing  his  own  property,  which  reflects  credit  upon  the  entire  locality. 

Mr.  Ohl  married  Sarah  Dietrich,  daughter  of  Jacob  Dietrich,  and  seven 
children  have  been  born  to  them,  namely :  Cora,  who  is  living  in  the  South ; 
Gertrude,  who  is  now  the  wife  of  Charles  Rank,  of  Mahanoy  City;  Earl,  Roy, 
Emma,  Dewey  and  Carrie,  all  living  at  home.  The  family  attend  the  Reformed 
Church. 

ALBERT  BALDINGER,  proprietor  of  a  general  store  and  confectionery 
at  Cressona,  in  North  Manheim  township,  Schuylkill  county,  was  bom  Jan. 
16,  1862,  in  Albany  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  son  of  Frederick  Baldinger,  a 
native  of  Germany. 

Frederick  Baldinger,  the  father  of  Albert  Baldinger,  came  to  America 
when  a  young  man  and  settled  at  Jacksonville,  Lehigh  Co.,  Pa.  He  was  a 
tailor  by  trade,  and  conducted  an  establishment  in  Jacksonville  until  his  death. 
He  married  Polly  Bolmer,  who  died  in  Albany  township,  Berks  county.  To 
this  marriage  was  bom  but  one  child,  Albert. 

Albert  Baldinger  was  reared  to  farm  work,  and  was  employed  by  neighbor- 
ing farmers  throughout  his  childhood.     Until  six  years  old  he  lived  with 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  691 

George  Greenawald,  and  he  was  employed  in  Albany  township  until  twelve 
years  old.  He  then  came  to  Auburn,  Schuylkill  county,  and  followed  carpet 
weaving  for  one  year,  and  was  with  Dr.  Quail  for  a  year.  He  next  turned  to 
railroad  work,  being  in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway 
Company  from  Jan.  lo,  1881,  until  July  28,  1913.  He  came  to  Cressona 
April  25,  1896,  and  opened  his  present  store  on  Railroad  street  in  191 1.  Mr. 
Baldinger  carries  a  complete  line  of  goods  such  as  are  usually  found  in  a  gen- 
eral store,  besides  handling  ice  cream  and  confectionery. 

Mr.  Baldinger  was  married  at  Jefferson,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  to  Alice  Wike, 
of  this  county,  and  /to  them  have  been  bom  five  children :  Charles,  Irvin, 
Foster,  William  and  Frederick;  the  two  last  named  are  deceased.  Mr.  Bald- 
inger is  a  Republican  in  politics.  He  was  elected  councilman  of  Cressona  in 
^91 3»  ^y  ^  large  majority,  and  takes  a  keen  interest  in  local  politics.  He  is  a 
popular  man  in  his  borough  and  is  known  as  an  enterprising  and  progressive 
citizen.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Reformed  Church,  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Read- 
ing Relief  Association,  and  of  the  Brotherhood  of  Railroad  Trainmen. 

J.  F.  MINOGUE,  attorney  at  law,  Ashland,  Pennsylvania. 

JOSEPH  E.  BOE,  of  Tower  City,  who  has  recently  taken  the  position  of 
inside  foreman  at  the  West  Brookside  colliery,  has  had  a  thorough  experience 
in  that  capacity  in  the  course  of  his  long  employment  at  local  operations.  He 
is  very  well  known  in  fraternal  circles,  and  highly  esteemed  among  all  his 
acquaintances.  ^ 

Daniel  Boe,  father  of  Joseph  E.  Boe,  was  bom  in  the  Lebanon  valley,  in 
this  State,  whence  he  removed  to  Schuylkill  county.  He  had  followed  the 
blacksmith's  trade  for  some  time,  and  was  here  employed  as  engineer  at  vari- 
ous collieries,  first  at  the  Lorberry,  later  at  Rausch  Creek  and  the  Lincoln 
colliery.  He  died  at  Joliett,  in  Porter  township,  this  county.  To  his  marriage 
with  Mary  Fessler  were  bom  the  following  children:  Ida,  who  married  Henry 
Harvey;  Thopolius,  deceased;  Annie,  wiJFe  of  John  Minnig;  Joseph  E. ;  and 
Ellen  Amanda,  wife  of  Frank  Schell. 

Joseph  E.  Boe  was  bom  Jan.  3,  1870,  in  Tremont  township,  Schuylkill 
county,  and  attended  public  school  there  and  aliso  in  Porter  township.  He 
b^^n  mine  work  at  the  age  of  eleven  years,  picking  slate  at  the  breaker,  and 
was  advanced  to  more  responsible  jobs  as  he  became  competent  until  he  reached 
the  grade  of  regular  miner,  being  so  engaged  for  about  ten  years.  He  was 
then  made  assistant  inside  foreman  at  the  Lincoln  colliery,  serving  as  such 
until  1902,  when  he  was  promoted  to  inside  foreman  there,  holding  that  posi- 
tion to  the  entire  satisfaction  of  all  concerned  until  July,  191 5,  when  transferred 
to  a  similar  post  at  the  West  Brookside  colliery.  Mr.  Boe  has  attended  to 
his  duties  intelligently  and  conscientiously,  adding  constantly  to  his  good  repu- 
tation by  his  strict  adherence  to  the  highest  standards  of  efficiency  in  the  work 
carried  on  under  his  direction.  He  has  won  his  way  forward  entirely  on  his 
own  merit,  and  deserves  all  the  credit  for  his  steady  advancement.  Socially 
he  has  numerous  connections,  belonging  to  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  the  Knights  of 
the  Golden  Eagle,  Knights  of  Malta,  Red  Men  and  Royal  Arcanum. 

Mr.  Boe  married  Daisy  Shellenberger,  daughter  of  Alonzo  Shellenberger, 
of  Shenandoah,  this  county,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  four  children :  Daniel, 


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692  /      SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

William,  Jennie  and  Grace.    Their  home  is  at  Tower  City.    The  family  are 
members  of  the  English  Lutheran  Church. 

E.  C.  MALARKEY,  Girardville,  Pennsylvania,  district  manager  for  the 
Cunningham  Piano  Company. 

HARRY  p.  REED,  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  belongs  to  a  family  which  has 
been  resident  in  Schuylkill  county  for  several  generations  and  at  all  times  repre- 
sented among  the  best  citizenship  of  this  region.  He  himself  has  made  a  sub- 
stantial success  as  a  contractor  and  builder,  for  though  he  has  been  in  business 
on  his  own  account  only  a  few  years  he  has  established  a  reputation  for- 
reliable  work  and  conscientious  attention  to  his  obligations  which  inspires  the 
confidence  necessary  to  steady  patronage. 

John  Reed,  great-grandfather  of  Harry  D.  Reed,  lived  at  Reedsville,  Schuyl- 
kill county,  and  was  one  of  the  well  known  farmers  of  that  section  in  his  day. 
He  owned  the  tract  now  in  the  possession  of  Oscar  Mengle.  He  was  twice 
married,  his  second  wife  being  named  Kimmel,  and  they  are  buried  at  Reeds- 
ville. To  this  marriage  were  bom  children  as  follows :  George,  William,  Daniel 
K.,  Elias,  Hannah  (married  Peter  Reed)  and  Elizabeth  (married  William 
Fehr). 

I>anfiel  K.  Reed,  son  of  John,  above,  was  bom  at  Reedsville  and  like  his 
father  followed  farming.  He  was  also  an  auctioneer,  his  services  being  in 
great  demand.  After  his  marriage  he  removed  to  Wayne  township,  where 
he  had  a  farm  of  eighty  acres,  and  he  died  there  at  the  age  of  fifty-four  years; 
he  is  buried  in  the  cemetery  at  Friedensburg.  He  married  Susan  Berger, 
daughter  of  Ludwig  Berger,  of  North  Manheim  township,  and  they  became 
the  parents  of  the  following  children :  Lyman  G.  is  mentioned  below ;  Mendon 
died  at  Friedensburg,  this  county;  Elizabeth  married  Lewis  J.  Brown,  who 
lived  at  Cressona  ( he  was  a  school  teacher  for  sixteen  years,  served  as  steward 
at  the  county  almshouse,  was  at  one  time  county  commissioner,  and  was  a  justice 
of  the  peace)  ;  Arabella  married  William  W.  Berkheiser,  and  is  living  in  South 
Manheim  township;  Ida  married  Lewis  E.  Brown,  of  Washington  township, 
and  both  are  deceased;  Gordon  D.,  who  was  also  steward  at  the  Almshouse, 
is  the  father  of  Frederick  B.  Reed,  present  postmaster  of  Schuylkill  Haven; 
Sherman  H.  is  a  farmer  and  auctioneer,  living  near  Cressona  (he  was  jury 
commissioner  for  six  years),  Annie  married  George  Emerich. 

Lyman  G.  Reed  was  bom  at  Friedensburg,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  con- 
tinues to  resic^e,  engaged  in  farming  and  as  an  auctioneer,  in  the  latter  line 
having  been  in  partnership  with  his  brother  Shermjin  H.  Reed  for  over  thirty 
years ;  their  services  are  in  great  demand.  Lyman  G.  Reed  has  also  had  the 
contract  as  Star  route  carrier  from  Friedensburg  to  Schuylkill  Haven  for  eight 
years.  He  and  his  wife,  Elizabeth  (Werner),  have  spent  all  their  married 
life  on  the  farm.  Eight  children  have  been  bom  to  them,  namely :  ( i )  Harry  D. 
is  mentioned  below.  (2)  Ida  is  the  wife  of  Frank  Dietrich,  who  lives  on  the  old 
Neri  Dietrich  farm  near  Friedensburg  and  is  a  very  successful  agriculturist. 
They  have  one  son,  Claudie.  (3)  Katie  is  married  to  Robert  Fenstermaker, 
and  has  two  children,  Norman  and  Elizabeth.  They  reside  on  Centre  avenue, 
in  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  Mr.  Fenstermaker  is  engaged  as  a  carpenter  at  the 
Pottsville  Union  Traction  car  barn,  Palo  Alto,  holding  a  responsible  position; 
(4)  James  L.,  who  lives  with  his  parents,  is  engaged  as  a  carpenter  for  his 
brother,  Harry  D.  Reed,  and  gives  every  indication  of  becoming  a  successful 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  693 

mechanic.  (5)  Estella  is  the  wife  of  Samuel  L.  Weidner,  who  holds  a  lucrative 
position  in  an  iron  foundry  at  Reading,  and  they  reside  there,  at  No.  1654  North 
Tenth  street.  They  have  two  children,  Williard  and  Elizabeth.  (6)  George  L., 
who  is  living  at  home  on  the  farm,  first  attended  the  schools  of  Wayne  town- 
ship, graduated  from  Cressona  high  school,  subsequently  studied  at  the  Key- 
stone State  Normal  School  (Kutztown,  Pa.),  and  took  a  course  at  Conway 
Hall,  one  of  the  departments  of  Dickinson  College,  Carlisle,  Pa.,  graduating 
therefrom.  For  three  terms  he  taught  school,  l^ing  engaged  at  the  Reed's 
school  at  Friedensburg,  the  Drehersville  school  and  the  grammar  school  at 
Quakake,  and  is  now  a  law  student,,  reading  in  the  office  of  Charles  E.  Berger, 
Esq.,  one  of  the  best  lawyers  at  the  Schuylkill  county  bar.  For  a  brief  period 
he  was  employed  by  the  Rakestraw  Pyle  Company,  of  Kenneh  Square,  Pa.,  as 
salesman,  and  had  splendid  success.  During  the  existence  of  the  Pennsyl- 
vania Chestnut  Blight  Commission  he  was  appointed  as  field  agent  and  located 
in  western  Pennsylvania,  where  he  served  with  credit.  (7)  Robert  R.,  the 
youngest  son,  living  at  home,  helps  on  the  farm,  serves  as  assistant  mail  driver, 
and  has  also  put  in  considerable  time  at  carpenter  work  under  his  brother's 
direction.  (8)  Edna  M.,  the  youngest  of  the  family,  also  lives  at  home,  helping 
her  mother  and  following  dressmaking.  She  is  a  pianist  of  great  promise.  All 
of  the  family  but  Mrs.  Reed  and  Edna  have  affiliated  with  the  Reformed 
Church,  the  others  being  Lutherans. 

Harry  D.  Reed  was  bom  Aug.  i,  1877,  at  Friedensburg,  Schuylkill  county, 
was  reared  upon  the  home  farm,  and  attended  the  public  schools  of  the  locality. 
When  twenty-one  years  old  he  began  to  learn  the  trade  of  carpenter,  at  which 
occupation  he  has  since  been  engaged,  following  it  in  the  employ  of  others 
until  1910,  the  year  he  commenced  business  on  his  own  responsibility.  He  has 
had  a  number  of  contracts  for  houses  and  barns,  having  done  considerable 
work  in  Schuylkill  Haven,  which  stands  as  a  credit  to  his  workmanship  and 
intelligent  understanding  of  up-to-date  methods  and  ideas  in  his  calling.  He 
keeps  several  men  regularly  eipployed.  Mr.  Reed  has  his  residence  and  shop 
on  the  same  property,  at  Union  street  and  Avenue  A.  He  has  every  promise 
of  a  prosperous  cfereer. 

Mr.  Reed  is  married  to  Estella  Hughes,  daughter  of  Isaac  Hughes,  and 
they  have  three  children :  Melvin,  Gertrude  and  Frederick.  He  is  a  member 
of  the  Lutheran  Church,  and  fraternally  belongs  to  Washington  Camp,  No. 
264,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  at  Friedensburg ;  to  Page  Lodge,  No.  270,  F.  &  A.  M. ;  and 
to  the  Owls  and  Heptasophs  at  Schuylkill  Haven. 

IRVIN  L.  LAUTENBACHER,  member  of  the  firm  of  Schwenk  &  Co., 
whose  underwear  mill  at  Schuylkill  Haven  is  one  of  the  growing  industrial . 
plants  of  the  borough,  is  at  present  giving  all  his  time  to  the  direction  of  its 
operation,  though  until  recently  he  was  carrying  other  business  responsibilities 
as  well.  Mr.  Lautenbacher  is  a  native  of  Schuylkill  Haven  and  of  German 
descent,  being  the  youngest  son  of  the  late  Charles  Lautenbacher. 

Charles  Lautenbacher  was  born  July  15,  1832,  in  Germany,  being  a  native 
of  Ballafengen,  in  the  grand  duchy  of  Baden.  Coming  to  America  when  nine- 
teen years  old,  he  first  located  at  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  living  there  for  some  time, 
and  he  was  employed  in  the  construction  of  the  stone  work  of  the  well  known  ^ 
"Continental  Hotel'*  in  that  city.  Thence  he  removed  to  Baltimore,  Md.,  and 
subsequently  to  Alexandria,  Va.,  and  Camden,  N.  J.,  his  next  location  being  at 
Kutztown,  Pa.,  where  he  remained  some  time  and  married.     From  there  he 


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694  SChUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

came  to  Schuylkill  Haven,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  made  a  permanent 
home,  engaging  in  his  calling  of  marble  and  stone  cutter  until  his  death,  which 
occurred  Aug.  9,  1881.  At  Kutztown  he  met  and  married  Sarah  Ann  Graeff, 
who  was  bom  Dec.  17,  1831,  daughter  of  John  and  Mary  (Kutz)  GraeflF,  and 
died  Aug.  17,  1904.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lautenbacher  were  bom  three  children: 
Jeremiah  C,  Irvin  L.  and  Flora. 

Mrs.  Lautenbacher  was  a  native  of  Kutztown,  Berks  county,  which  place 
was  so  named  in  honor  of  her  maternal  ancestors,  who  were  early  pioneers  of 
that  county.  They  experienced  the  usual  hardships  and  dangers  of  the  days 
when  the  Indians  were  numerous  and  hostile,  and  there  is  a  well  established 
tradition  in  the  family  that  her  great-grandfather  had  a  secret  cave  to  which 
he  could  retire  with  his  family  in  emergency,  and  that  the  Indians  never  suc- 
ceeded in  locating  this  hiding  place.  George  Kutz  bought  a  tract  of  130  acres 
from  Peter  Wentz  in  1755,  and  there  in  1779  laid  out  the  town  which  has 
developed  into  one  of  the  important  boroughs  of  Berks  county  and  still  bears 
his  name.  The  first  tax  list  of  the  borough,  made  in  1817,  records  the  follow- 
ing Kutzes:  Peter,  tinsmith;  Adam,  carpenter;  Jacob,  mason;  John,  tailor; 
Peter  (who  was  a  Revolutionary  soldier)  ;  Daniel ;  and  Solomon,  butcher. 

Solomon  Kutz,  the  last  named,  was  the  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Lautenbacher. 
He  was  long  engaged  as  a  butcher  at  Kutztown,  and  lived  to  the  age  of  ninety- 
two  years.  Among  his  children  were  the  following :  Mary,  Mrs.  John  GraeflF, 
died  at  Kutztown  when  seventy-nine  years  old ;  her  children  were  Daniel,  John, 
Catherine  (Mrs.  John  Stickman)  and  Sarah  Ann  (Mrs.  Charles  Lautenbacher). 
Lydia,  who  died  at  West  Pemi,  Pa.,  was  the  wife  of  Oscar  Sheetz  and  mother 
of  Oscar,  Buchanan,  Tillie  and  Sara.  Reuben  lived  and  died  at  Ktitztown. 
Louisa  married  Daniel  Kutz,  son  of  Benjamin,  and  lived  at  Kutztown,  now 
(1914)  aged  eighty-six  years.  Susanna  married  Harry  Shide  and  lives  at 
Kutztown,  now  aged  eighty-four  years. 

Irvin  L.  Lautenbacher  was  bom  at  Schuylkill  Haven  Feb.  21,  1862,  and 
received  his  preparatory  education  in  the  public  schools  of  the  borough,  attend- 
ing high  school.  He  then  took  a  course  at  the  Philadelphia  College  of  Phar- 
macy, graduating  in  1885,  and  followed  his  calling  at  Schuylkill  Haven  for  the 
three  years  succeeding.  Removing  to  Williamstown,  Dauphin  county,  this 
State,  he  engaged  in  the  drug  business  on  his  own  account,  and  was  estab- 
lished there  for  a  period  of  seventeen  years.  At  the  end  of  that  time  he  re- 
tumed  to  his  native  place,  where  he  went  into  business  as  a  confectioner  and 
ice  cream  manufacturer,  continuing  in  this  line  until  the  fall  of  1913,  when  he 
sold  out  to  give  all  his  attention  to  the  knitting  mill  in  which  he  had  become 
interested  in  the  meantime.  It  was  in  1910  that  he  took  up  the  manufacture 
of  underwear  in  partnership  with  M.  G.  Schwenk,  and  they  have  since  been 
doing  business  as  Schwenk  &  Co.,  having  a  well  equipped  plant  at  Schuylkill 
Haven.  Their  building  is  40  by  75  feet  in  dimensions,  and  from  thirty  to  forty 
people  are  given  steady  employment  in  the  production  of  ladies'  Swiss  ribbed 
underwear,  for  which  the  firm  has  found  a  steady  demand.  Mr.  Lautenbacher 
and  his  partner  are  men  of  high  business  principle,  and  their  conscientious  en- 
deavors to  put  a  high-grade  product  on  the  market  have  met  with  substantial 
approval  in  the  form  of  wide  patronage.  Mr.  Lautenbacher  has  proved  his 
executive  qualities  and  versatility  in  the  success  he  has  made  of  his  various 
ventures,  diflfering  so  widely  in  nature,  and  in  all  his  associations  he  has  shown 
the  spirit  of  accommodation  to  patrons  and  efforts  to  meet  their  wants  which 
cannot  fail  to  attract  trade.    He  is  a  man  of  commendable  personal  character, 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  -695 

a  credit  to  a  name  which  has  always  been  synonymous  in  the  community  with 
honesty  of  purpose  and  dignified  labor. 

Mr.  Lautenbacher  married  Kate  E.  Schwenk,  daughter  of  Jacob  R.  and 
Mary  A.  (Crebs)  Schwenk  and  member  of  an  old  family  of  Schuylkill  Haven. 
They  have  had  three  children:  Ivan  L.,  now  a  clerk  in  the  railway  mail 
service  and  located  at  Tyrone,  Pa. ;  Ruth  A.  and  Kathryn,  both  at  home.  The 
family  reside  on  Main  street.  They  are  members  of  the  United  Evangelical 
Church. 

JAMES  H.  FISTER,  late  of  Pottsville,  passed  most  of  his  life  in  that 
borough,  having  moved  here  in  boyhood.  He  was  a  native  of  Bloomsburg, 
Columbia  Co.,  Pa.,  bom  in  183 1,  and  finished  his  schooling  at  Pottsville.  For 
several  years  he  was  in  the  employ  of  his  uncle,  Mr.  Silliman,  who  was  a  large 
coal  operator,  acting  for  some  time  as  superintendent  of  his  mines.  He  then 
became  a  mail  agent»  between  Pottsville  and  Philadelphia,  on  the  railroad, 
leaving  Pottsville  at  eight  in  the  morning  and  returning  at  eight  in  the  even- 
ing. He  was  so  engaged  for  many  years.  At  one  time  he  was  agent  for  the 
old  Howard  Express  Company,  when  its  offices  were  on  South  Centre  street, 
Pottsville,  where  the  Miller  automobile  store  is  now  located.  The  business 
of  this  company  was  eventually  taken  over  by  the  Adams  Express  Company. 
However,  he  was  best  known  as  justice  of  the  peace,  to  which  office  he  was 
first  elected  in  1890,  succeeding  Charles  G.  Reed,  who  had  been  appointed 
by  Governor  Beaver  to  succeed  his  father  upon  the  latter's  death.  Mr.  Fister 
continued  to  serve  as  justice  of  the  peace  until  that  office  was  abolished  several 
years  ago,  by  a  new  charter  which  Pottsville  received,  at  the  time  of  the 
annexation  of  Yorkville.  He  then  took  out  a  conmiission  as  notary  public, 
and  continued  to  act  as  such  until  his  death,  which  occurred  April  3,  1914,  at 
his  home.  No.  300  Mahantongo  street.  Mr.  Fister  also  maintained  his  office 
at  that  location,  where  he  had  been  established  for  many  years,  and  he  was 
widely  acquainted  in  Pottsville,  his  upright,  unassuming  life  gaining  him  the 
esteem  of  all  who  knew  him. 

Mr.  Fister  was  an  Odd  Fellow,  and  a  Republican  on  political  questions. 
He  never  married.  He  had  several  brothers  and  sisters  who  lived  in  Schuylkill 
county,  but  all  predeceased  him. 

CHARLES  K.  BOWEN,  engaged  in  the  coal  washing  business  at  Adams- 
dale,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  was  bom  in  North  Manheim  township,  that  county, 
Sept.  16,  1884,  and  is  a  son  of  Charles  K.  Bowen,  grandson  of  Martin  Bowen, 
and  great-grandson  of  John  Bowen,  the  latter  a  forgeman  and  pioneer  farmer 
of  Port  ainton,  Schuylkill  county. 

Marfin  Bowen  was  a  farmer  during  all  of  his  active  years.  At  the  death  of 
his  father  he  inherited  a  third  of  the  homestead  (sixty-five  acres),  which  he 
cultivated,  later  buying  the  old  Kershner  farm  of  fifty-four  acres.  Both  of 
these  properties  were  in  North  Manheim  township.  He  died  at  the  age  of 
eighty-four  years,  and  is  buried  in  the  cemetery  of  the  Jemsalem  Union  Church 
at  Schuylkill  Haven,  of  which  he  was  an  active  Lutheran  member  and  one  of 
the  building  committee  which  supervised  its  erection.  Mr.  Bowen  was  wedded 
to  Mary  Kershner,  and  to  them  these  children  were  bom:  Charles  K. ; 
Amanda,  deceased,  who  was  married  to  Jacob  Kirk ;  Matilda,  who  died  at  the 
age  of  sixty-nine  years;  Louis,  unmarried,  living  in  North  Manheim  town- 


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696  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

ship;  John  A.,  living  in  Schuylkill  Haven;  and  Morris  W.,  a  prominent  fanner 
of  North  Manheim  township. 

Charles  K.  Bowen,  father  of  Charles  K.  Bowen,  was  bom  on  the  home- 
stead in  North  Manheim  township,  and  was  an  agriculturist  all  of  his  days. 
He  married  Mary  Staller,  by  whom  he  had  ten  children,  viz. :  Harry,  Gussie, 
Edward,  William,  Howard,  Samuel,  Elsie,  Charles  K.,  and  two  who  died  young. 
Charles  K.  Bowen  died  in  his  forty-fifth  year,  and  after  his  death  the  widow 
married  Morris  W.  Bowen,  his  brother.  To  this  latter  union  two  children  were 
bom,  Warren  and  Lister. 

Charles  K.  Bowen,  son  of  Charles  K.,  attended  the  schools  of  North  Man- 
heim township  and  worked  upon  the  home  farm  for  a  time.  He  then  went  to 
Moimt  Carbon  and  worked  in  the  Pennsylvania  Railroad  car  shops  for  four 
years,  after  which  he  took  up  the  occupation  of  coal  washing,  which  he  has 
followed  ever  since.  He  has  his  washery  at  Landingville,  fitted  with  all  the 
latest  machinery,  and  is  doing  a  large  business,  selling  his  coal  both  wholesale 
and  retail.    He  was  formerly  associated  in  business  with  Irvin  Alsbach. 

Mr.  Bowen  is  a  public-spirited  man  and  is  popular  with  all  classes  of  pec^le 
in  his  vicinity.  He  resides  in  a  beautiful  home  at  Adamsdale.  He  is  fond 
of  automobiling  and  owns  a  fine  seven-passenger  touring  car,  from  which 
he  and  his  wife  obtain  a  great  deal  of  pleasure  and  recreation.  Mr.  Bowen 
was  married  to  Anna  Aulenbach,  daughter  of  Pierce  and  Mary  (Moyer)  Aulen- 
bach.  They  have  no  children.  He  is  a  member  of  Christ's  Lutheran  Church 
of  Schuylkill  Haven,  is  a  Democrat  in  politics,  and  a  member  of  the  Patriotic 
Order  Sons  of  America  at  Schuylkill  Haven. 

Pierce  Aulenbach,  father  of  Mrs.  Bowen,  resided  at  Adamsdale  and  was  a 
carpenter  by  occupation.  He  married  Mary  Moyer,  of  Bernville,  Berks  Co., 
Pa.,  and  they  had  children:  Samuel,  of  Schuylkill  Haven;  Anna,  wife  of 
Charles  K.  Bowen;  Cora,  wife  of  Irvin  Alsbach;  Sadie;  Robert;  Hartie;  Ray- 
mond, and  Hannah.  Mr.  Aulenbach  died  May  5,*  1906,  at  Adamsdale,  and  is 
buried  in  the  cemetery  of  Zion's  (Red)  Cliurch. 

CHARLES  QUANDEL,  at  present  serving  as  fire  chief  of  Minersville,  is 
also  one  of  the  respected  business  men  of  that  borough,  where  he  has  built 
up  a  profitable  contracting  business.  Formerly  he  was  also  engaged  in  the 
burning  of  lime.  He  was  bom  at  Minersville,  April  3,  1875,  son  of  Emil  Quan- 
del.  The  father  was  a  native  of  Berlin,  Germany,  came  to  America  when  a 
young  man,  and  first  settled  at  Ashland,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  Later  he  removed 
to  Minersville,  where  he  became  engaged  in  lime  burning,  following  this  busi- 
ness for  many  years.  His  death  occurred  suddenly  at  Shenandoah,  this  county, 
and  he  is  buried  at  Minersville.  By  his  marriage  to  Wilhelmina  Vonder-Heiden 
he  had  three  children :  F.  J.  R.,  who  is  now  a  resident  of  Philadelphia,  Pa. ; 
William,  of  New  Jersey ;  and  Charles. 

Charles  Quandel  grew  up  to  manhood  at  Minersville  and  attended  the 
public  schools  in  his  boyhood.  In  his  early  life  he  became  employed  at  lime 
burning  for  a  time,  and  also  in  the  cement  and  concrete  business,  and  in  191 2 
engaged  in  the  lumber  business,  to  which  he  has  since  added  contracting  and 
building.  His  combined  interests  oflfer  him  steady  employment,  and  he  is  well 
known  in  his  line  for  reliable  dealings  and  uprightness  in  all  his  transactions. 
Since  191 2  Mr.  Quandel  has  been  fire  chief  at  Minersville,  an  honor  which 
indicates  unquestionably  the  confidence  which  his  fellow  citizens  repose  in  him. 
He  is  well  known  in  the  local  fratemal  bodies,  being  a  member  of  Minersville 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  697 

Lodge,  No.  222,  F.  &  A.  M. ;  of  the  chapter  at  Minersville ;  commandery  at 
Pottsville,  and  Philadelphia  Consistory,  having  attained  tfie  thirty-second 
d^ee;  he  also  belongs  to  Rajah  Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.,  at  Reading,  Pa. 
Besides  his  Masonic  connections  he  holds  membership  in  the  Independent  Order 
of  Odd  Fellows,  the  Royal  Arcanum  and  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A. 

Mr.  Quandel  married  Bessie  Noble,  of  Pottsville,  daughter  of  William 
Noble,  of  Pottsville,  Pa.,  and  granddaughter  of  the  late  John  T.  and  Sarah 
Noble;  John  T.  Noble  was  the  proprietor  of  the  iron  works  which  bore  his 
name.  The  children  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Quandel  are :  Adda  M.,  Doris  May 
and  C.  Nobel. 

MAJ.  JOHN  F.  OWENS,  of  Pottsville,  has  the  distinction  of  being  the 
oldest  member  of  the  National  Guard  in  the  State  of  Pennsylvania.  He  has 
been  on  the  retired  list  of  that  body  since  1909,  but  he  is  still  connected  with 
the  service,  being  at  present  caretaker  of  the  new  State  Armory  at  Pottsville. 
Major  Owens  was  bom  in  this  city  Aug.  16,  1851,  son  of  Thomas  Owens,  a 
native  of  Wales,  who  came  to  the  United  States  in  young  manhood  and  settled 
in  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  followed  mining.  He  died  at  Potts- 
ville, and  is  buried  in  the  Odd  Fellows  cemetery  there.  His  wife  was  Hannah 
Mitchel. 

Major  Owens  received  a  common  school  education,  and  in  his  youth  did 
day^s  work  until  he  entered  the  employ  of  Mr.  Spark,  with  whom  he  learned  the 
trade  of  boilermaker.  Subsequently  he  entered  the  shops  of  the  Philadelphia 
&  Reading  Company,  where  he  was  employed  at  boilermaking  until  191 1 — a 
long  period  of  service  with  the  same  concern.  Then  for  a  few  years  he  was 
tipstaff  at  the  courthouse,  and  in  January,  1914,  he  became  caretaker  at  the 
new  State  Armory  in  Pottsville,  which  position  he  now  holds.  Major  Owens 
is  particularly  well  known  in  his  long  association  with  the  Pennsylvania  National 
Guard,  in  which  he  enlisted  Oct.  i,  1870,  as  a  member  of  Company  G,  7th  Regi- 
ment, Light  Infantry  of  Pottsville.  His  record  is  as  follows :  "Corporal,  Com- 
pany G,  7th  Regiment,  N.  G.  of  Pa.,  Feb.  10,  1877;  Corporal,  Company  F, 
1st  R^ment,  Inf.  Vol.,  Aug.  23,  1877;  Sergeant,  Company  G,  7th  Regiment, 
N.  G.  of  Pa.,  Dec.  8,  1877 ;  First  Sergeant,  Company  H,  8th  Regiment,  N.  G. 
of  Pa.,  June  5,  1882;  second  lieutenant,  Company  H,  8th  Regiment,  N.  G.  of 
Pa.,  July  2,  1889 ;  first  lieutenant.  Company  H,  8th  Regiment,  N'.  G.  of  Pa,,  July 
19,  1889;  captain,  Company  H,  8th  Regiment,  N.  G.  of  Pa.,  April  23,  1894; 
Major,  8th  Regiment,  Oct.  18,  1892."  On  Aug.  12,  1909,  Major  Owens  was 
placed  on  the  retired  list.  He  has  a  fine  medal,  presented  to  him  in  recognition 
of  his  extended  service.  His  association  with  Good  Intent  Fire  Company  has 
covered  almost  as  long  a  period,  he  having  joined  that  organization  forty  years 
ago. 

On  Dec.  16,  1875,  Major  Owens  married  Mary  McGinley,  by  which  union 
he  had  three  children:  Frances,  John  and  Anna  (deceased).  His  second  mar- 
riage was  to  Emma  Heffner,  daughter  of  the  late  Edward  Heffner,  who  at  one 
time  served  as  burgess  of  Pottsville,  and  to  them  were  bom  two  children: 
Harry,  a  civil  and  mining  engineer,  now  located  at  Wiikes-Barre,  Pa.;  and 
Arthur,  a  machinist,  in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Coal  and 
Iron  Company  at  Pottsville.  For  his  third  wife  Major  Owens  married  Mary 
Flummer,  and  four  children  were  bom  to  this  marriage:  William,  Anna, 
Thomas  and  Elizabeth. 

The  Major  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Church.    He  does  not  identify 


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698  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

himself  with  any  political  party,  voting  independently  on  all  questions.  He  is 
a  citizen  who  holds  the  unqualified  respect  of  his  fellow  men  wherever  known, 
and  has  made  a  record  of  faithful  service  in  every  capacity  of  which  he  may 
well  be  proud  and  which  entitles  him  to  high  regard. 

ELVIN  W.  KEITH,  M.  D.,  of  Minersville,  though  just  at  the  outset  of 
his  professional  career  has  every  promise  of  success  in  his  chosen  calling,  for 
which  he  has  had  the  good  fortune  to  be  thoroughly  prepared.  He  is  a  native 
of  Luzerne  coimty,  Pa.,  born  Aug.  26,  1886,  at  Stockton.  His  father,  George 
Keith,  came  to  America  from  Germany  when  a  child  and  made  his  home  in 
Luzerne  coimty,  Pa.,  for  many  years.  By  trade  he  was  a  carpenter,  and  for 
many  years  was  engaged  in  contracting  in  that  line  where  he  now  resides. 
He  is  carpenter  foreman  at  the  Pine  Hill  coUiery.  He  married  Martha  Schnei- 
der, and  they  have  the  following  children :  Orthia,  Mrs.  Georee  Pettit ;  Anna, 
Mrs.  Eilus  Saylor ;  George,  of  Nazareth,  Pa. ;  Regina,  wife  of  Frank  Snyder, 
postmaster  of  Minersville;  Harry,  of  Minersville;  Elvin  W.;  Stanley,  of  South 
Bethlehem,  Pa. ;  and  Hilda,  Mrs.  Fred  German,  of  Paterson,  New  Jersey. 

Elvin  W.  Keith  attended  public  school  and  was  graduated  from  the  Miners- 
ville high  school  in  the  class  of  1907.  He  then  took  his  professional  course, 
at  the  Jefferson  Medical  College,  Philadelphia,  from  which  inkitution  he  was 
graduated  in  1913.  During  the  year  following  he  was  stationed  at  the  Potts- 
ville  Hospital,  on  June  i,  1914,  locating  at  Minersville,  where  he  has  since  been 
engaged  in  general  practice.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Schuylkill  County  Medical 
Society  and  the  American  Medical  Association.  Dr.  Keith  has  made  an 
excellent  start  and  is  gaining  steadily  in  the  confidence  and  esteem  of  the  resi- 
dents of  Minersville  and  vicinity.  He  is  married  to  Helen  C.  Dougherty.  The 
Keith  family  are  Methodists  in  religious  faith. 

MANUEL  W.  BROMMER,  of  Landingville,  Schuylkill  county,  seems  to 
have  found  the  solution  of  being  "pleasantly  and  profitably  employed"  for  him- 
self, at  any  rate,  and  his  beautifully  kept  little  property  is  one  of  the  features 
of  the  neighborhood,  where  enterprises  similar  to  his  are  rare.  For  a  ntunber 
of  years  Mr.  Brommer  was  an  employee  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Rail- 
road Company,  and  in  that  capacity  and  as  hotelkeeper  at  Landingville,  he  has 
a  very  wide  acquaintance.  Bom  Nov.  6,  1857,  in  South  Manheim  township, 
Schuylkill  county,  he  is  a  son  of  Lewis  Brommer  and  grandson  of  Henry 
Brommer.  The  latter  came  to  this  country  from  Germany  with  his  wife  and 
one  child,  and  settled  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  By  trade  he 
was  a  carpenter,  and  as  such  was  employed  at  the  locks  when  the  Schuylkill 
canal  was  under  construction. 

Lewis  Brommer,  father  of  Manuel  W.  Brommer,  was  bom  in  Wayne 
township.  While  living  in  Schuylkill  county  he  followed  farming,  and  in  1879 
he  moved  out  to  Missouri,  settling  at  Boonville,  where  he  continued  agricultural 
pursuits,  also  making  a  specialty  of  hog  raising.  He  prospered  and  continued 
to  reside  there  until  his  death.  His  wife  was  Eliza  Reber,  daughter  of  Samuel 
Reber,  and  they  had  children  as  follows :  Manuel  W.,  Morris,  Harry,  Robert, 
Francis,  Fulton,  Carrie,  Jennie  and  Pearl. 

Manuel  W.  Brommer  attended  public  school  during  his  boyhood,  and  later, 
in  1874-75,  was  a  student  of  the  Keystone  State  Normal  School  at  Kutztown, 
Pa.  In  his  young  manhood  he  taught  six  terms  of  school  in  Schuylkill  county, 
after  which  he  entered  the  service  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railroad 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  699 

Company.  Following  a  short  experience  as  brakeman  he  became  conductor  of 
a  freight  train,  and  soon  afterwards  a  passenger  train,  for  eight  years  being 
so  engaged  on  the  best  train  on  his  division,  the  "Cannon  Ball,"  running 
between  Pottsville  and  Philadelphia.  His  emplo)mient  with  the  railroad  com- 
pany extended  over  a  period  of  twenty  vears,  and  he  retired  in  1899,  at  which 
time  he  bought  the  hotel  at  Landingville.  He  conducted  it  as  proprietor  for 
seven  years,  leasing  the  property,  and  made  a  thorough  success  of  his  business, 
but  gave  it  up  to  enter  his  present  line,  the  raising  of  high-grade  chickens. 

Mr.  Brommer  has  bought  the  small  piece  of  ground  on  the  road  running 
west  from  Landingville,  a  short  distance  from  the  railroad  station,  two  and  a 
quarter  acres,  which  was  all  woodland  when  it  came  into  his  possession.  He 
put  up  a  little  two-story  house,  where  he  has  since  resided,  and  during  the  inter- 
vening years  has  improved  the  place  with  the  idea  of  making  it  an  ideal  poultry 
establishment.  Most  of  his  land  is  on  a  hillside,  and  at  the  foot  of  the  hill  is 
a  fine  stream  of  clear  water,  a  great  advantage  for  his  purpose.  He  has  eight 
pens,  8  by  10  feet  in  size,  with  wire  inclosures  10  by  100  feet  for  each,  the 
latter  extending  down  the  slope  of  the  hill  to  the  creek  at  the  bottom.  The 
houses  are  of  the  open  front  variety,  protected  in  the  winter  by  muslin  curtains. 
After  considerable  study  of  the  various  breeds  of  poultry,  Mr.  Brommer 
decided  on  the  White  Leghorns,  which  he  keeps  exclusively,  and  after  import- 
ing a  pen  of  Tom  Barron  Single  Comb  White  Leghorns  from  Preston,  England, 
he  had  such  favorable  results  that  he  has  tried  no  other  kind  since.  At  present 
he  has  about  one  himdred  and  fifty  chickens,  old  and  young,  and  the  effect 
of  scientific  feeding  and  unremitting  care  is  very  well  demonstrated,  for  often, 
even  during  the  winter  season,  he  gathers  as  many  eggs  daily  as  there  are  hens 
in  the  pens.  The  ^gs  are  always  very  large,  averaging  nearly  two  pounds  to 
the  dozen,  and  he  has  been  unable  to  supply  the  demand  for  hatching  purposes. 
In  one  season  from  his  small  flock  he  has  disposed  of  more  than  one  hundred 
and  fifty  dollars  worth  in  eggs  for  hatching  purposes.  Mr.  Brommer  has  made 
a  thorough  study  of  feed,  housing  and  the  ideal  conditions  for  his  stock,  and 
though  he  has  taken  infinite  pains  and  neglected  no  precautions  to  keep  the 
chickens  in  the  best  condition,  his  arrangements  have  been  so  perfected  that  he 
is  able  to  accomplish  all  the  necessary  work  with  the  minimum  of  labor. 
Qeanliness  is  the  prime  consideration,  whitewash  is  used  plentifully  wherever 
needed,  and  all  of  the  property  is  kept  in  a  most  attractive  state,  neatness  and 
true  economy  being  the  most  conspicuous  characteristics.  The  feed  house  is  one 
of  the  best  arranged  in  the  country.  Mr.  Brommer  erected  it  especially  for  his 
purpose  and  it  is  admirably  equipped,  about  20  feet  square  and  three  stories 
high.  The  lower  floor  is  used  for  the  mixing  of  the  feed  and  provided  with 
two  large  mixing  troughs,  a  grinder  and  a  gasoline  engine.  After  being  mixed 
in  the  trough  the  feed  is  ground,  and  then  placed  in  the  hopper  and  fed.  The 
hoppers  are  large  enough  to  hold  a  week's  supply  of  grain,  thus  eliminating 
much  of  the  work  of  feeding.  The  second  floor  is  so  arranged  that  a  team  can 
back  up  against  the  front  from  the  road  and  deliver  the  bags  of  feed  right  on 
the  floor.  The  bins,  six  in  number,  with  a  capacity  of  400  bushels,  are  on  this 
floor,  three  on  either  side  of  the  aisle.  These  bins  are  equipped  on  the  bottom 
with  chutes,  leading  into  and  operated  from  the  basement,  and  when  Mr. 
Brommer  wants  a  certain  kind  of  grain,  he  simply  taps  it  from  the  bin.  The 
third  floor  is  used  for  storage  purposes.  Here  he  keeps  his  incubators  when 
not  in  use,  and  various  other  articles. 

Along  with  the  raising  of  poultry  Mr.  Brimmer  has  continued  the  clearing 


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700  SCHUYLKILL  QOUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

of  his  land  and  its  improvement  in  other  lines.  He  plants  a  fair  sized  garden, 
raising  enough  vegetables  for  his  own  use,  and  he  has  set  out  fifty  peach  trees, 
principally  to  supply  shade  for  the  chickens  when  the  brush  and  trees  originally 
on  the  land  have  all  been  cleared  away.  Last  year  he  set  out  a  strawberry  bed, 
20  by  100  feet  in  size.  His  little  establishment  is  a  model  of  its  kind,  and 
though  he  has  expended  much  time  and  means  on  its  development  the  venture 
is  paying  him  weU.  Combining  study  with  intelligent  labor  he  has  worked  out 
many  problems  of  the  business  to  which  he  now  devotes  his  time,  making  experi- 
ments which  assist  his  neighbors  as  well  as  himself,  and  showing  the  possibili- 
ties of  the  industry  in  this  section  he  has  accomplished  at  least  one  thing  of 
distinct  value  to  his  neighborhood. 

Mr.  Brommer  is  a  skillful  watchmaker  and  jeweler,  and  while  on  the  rail- 
road he  was  well  known  as  a  reliable  repairman,  many  of  his  fellow  trainmen 
bringing  their  watches  to  him  for  care  and  adjustment.  He  continues  to  follow 
this  trade  as  occasion  demands.  Mr.  Brommer  is  a  member  of  the  Improved 
Order  of  Red  Men. 

JOHN  F.  SCHNEIDER,  late  of  Pottsville,  was  a  typical  member  of  the 
thrifty  German  stock  from  which  he  came,  a  skillful  tradesman,  industrious, 
honorable  in  all  his  dealings  and  prosperous  in  business,  as  a  result  of  trust- 
worthy methods  and  steady  service  to  his  patrons.  He  was  one  of  a  family  of 
five  children,  of  whom  August  died  at  Minersville,  Pa. ;  Lena  married  a  Mr. 
Burkhart ;  Sophia  married  Carl  Spaulding ;  Catherine  married  August  Orf . 

Mr.  Schneider  was  born  in  Saxony,  Germany,  in  1840.  He  grew  up  in  his 
native  country  and  was  a  young  man  when  he  came  to  America.  From  the 
time  of  his  settlement  in  this  country  he  lived  in  Schuylkill  county.  Pa.,  first 
at  Minersville  and  later  at  Pottsville,  where  he  resided  until  his  death.  A  shoe- 
maker by  trade,  he  followed  that  occupation  throughout  his  active  years,  and 
by  frugality  and  good  management  he  became  the  owner  of  several  valuable 
pieces  of  property.  Mr.  Schneider  was  a  man  of  fine  qualities  and  became  well 
and  favorably  known  in  this  regioi,  for  whose  interest  he  always  had  close 
concern.  His  death  occurred  Jan.  22,  1914,  at  his  residence  in  Pottsville,  No. 
214  North  Third  street,  and  he  is  buried  in  the  Odd  Fellows  cemetery.  He  was 
a  zealous  member  of  Trinity  Lutheran  Church,  and  in  his  will  bequeathed  one 
hundred  dollars  to  that  church  and  a  like  amount  to  the  Third  Brigade  Band 
of  Pottsville. 

Mr.  Schneider  married  Elizabeth  Klein,  who  was  bom  June  17,  1855,  ^^  the 
northwestern  part  of  Germany,  daughter  of  Joseph  and  Margaret  (Barnhart) 
Klein,  both  of  whom  died  in  Germany ;  they  had  six  children,  Mrs.  Schneider's 
brothers  and  sisters  being :  Frederick,  John,  Bernhart,  Josephine  and  Catherine. 
Mrs.  Schneider  came  to  America  when  fourteen  years  old,  and  lived  in  New 
York  City  for  five  years,  at  the  end  of  that  time  coming  to  Pottsville,  where 
she  has  since  made  her  home.  She  continues  to  occupy  the  old  residence  on 
North  Third  street.  Five  children  were  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Schneider:  John 
Frederick,  who  lives  at  Pottsville ;  August  F.,  who  died  when  twenty-two  years 
old ;  Charles,  who  died  young ;  Mary  EHzabeth,  who  married  John  W.  Brown, 
and  has  two  children :  Elma  E.  and  Robert  P. ;  and  Charles  F.,  living  at  home. 
The  family  are  members  of  Trinity  Lutheran  Church  at  Pottsville. 

CHARLES  H.  KRAMMES,  proprietor  of  the  "Auburn  Hotel,''  was  bom 
in  Wayne  township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  Feb.  12,  1851,  son  of  Benjamin  B. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  701 

Krammes  and  grandson  of  Andrew  Krammes.  The  family  is  one  of  the  oldest 
of  Gennan  ancestry  in  the  State.  Andrew  Krammes  lived  in  Wayne  township 
and  followed  farming  until  the  end  of  his  days.  He  is  buried  at  Summer  Hill 
cemetery.  His  children  were:  Moses,  Daniel,  Benjamin  B.,  Sarah,  Elizabeth, 
Louisa  and  Matilda. 

_  Benjamin  B.  Krammes  was  bom  in  Wayne  township,  and  followed  boating 
on  the  Schuylkill  canal  during  all  of  his  active  life.  He  died  in  Wayne  town- 
ship, and  is  buried  near  the  old  Summer  Hill  Church  there.  By  his  marriage 
to  Lucy  Ann,  daughter  of  Daniel  Krammes,  he  had  these  children :  Benjamm 
L.,  W.  W.,  Frank  S.,  Levi  (deceased),  Charles  H.,  James,  David,  Milton  and 
Polly  Ann  (who  married  Levi  Ditzler,  of  Washington  township).  After  the 
death  of  Mr.  Krammes  Mrs.  Krammes  married  Benjamin  Heimbach.  She  is 
now  deceased. 

Charles  H.  Krammes  obtained  his  education  in  the  public  schools.  He 
followed  boating  on  the  canal  for  eight  years,  after  which  he  took  up  the 
occupation  of  carpenter,  which  he  continued  for  ten  years.  He  then  went 
into  the  hotel  business,  which  he  has  carried  on  for  the  past  nineteen  years  at 
the  following  places :  Summit  Station ;  "Red  Lion  Hotel,"  Washington  town- 
ship; Rock  Station;  Friedensburg ;  "Half- Way  House,"  North  Manheim  town- 
ship; "Springer  Hotel,"  Cressona;  and  the  "Auburn  House,"  which  he  bought 
of  John  H.  Fahl  Feb.  i,  191 1.  He  is  conducting  the  most  popular  house  in  the 
borough  of  Auburn  and  caters  to  the  best  trade  of  the  county.  Mr.  Krammes 
is  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade  of  Auburn  and  in  every  way  is  a  citizen 
of  public  spirit  and  enterprise.  He  is  a  member  of  the  I.  O.  O.  F.  lodge  at 
Summit  Station,  and  also  of  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  camp  at  the  same  place.  In 
religious  affiliation  he  is  a  Lutheran.  Fraternally  he  is  a  Mason,  with  member- 
ship at  Pottsville. 

Mr.  Krammes  was  married  to  Sarah  Jane  Roeder,  daughter  of  Anthony 
Roeder,  of  Wayne  township,  and  they  have  had  twelve  children,  as  follows: 
( I )  Carrie  V.  is  the  wife  of  Jacob  W.  Qauser,  of  Auburn,  Pa.  (2)  Mabel  A., 
wife  of  Frank  Wilson,  is  living  in  Reading,  Pa.  (3)  Qora  M.,  wife  of  J.  D. 
Kantner,  died  at  the  age  of  twenty-five  years.  (4)  Sallie  A.  married  Henry 
H.  Emerich,  of  Summit  Station.  (5)  Fronie  J.  is  the  wife  of  Alvin  Maiden- 
ford,  of  Washington  township,  this  county.  (6)  Richard  E.  lives  at  Frack- 
ville.  Pa.  (7)  Rufus  V.  lives  at  Schuylkill  Haven  and  is  the  proprietor  of  the 
"Columbus  Hotel."  (8)  Mary  L.  is  the  wife  of  Edward  Moyer,  of  Pine 
Grove.  (9)  Elerttie  E.  married  Walter  Fegley,  of  Palo  Alto,  Pa.  (10)  Brua 
C.  lives  at  Pottsville,  Pa.  (11)  Curtis  E.  lives  at  Schuylkill  Haven.  (12) 
Hattie  F.  died  at  the  age  of  four  years. 

HENRY  YERGER,  retired  resident  of  Palo  Alto,  was  in  the  employ  of 
the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company  for  about  forty-eight  years. 
Mr.  Yerger  was  bom  April  i,  1844,  at  Leesport,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  son  of  George 
B.  Yei^er,  and  his  grandfather  lived  and  died  at  Reading,  Berks  county.  The 
latter  had  a  family  of  six  children,  namely :  John,  Benjamin,  George  B.,  Mary, 
Lydia  and  ElizatKBth. 

George  B.  Yerger,  father  of  Henry  Yerger,  was  bom  March  15,  1820,  at 
Reading,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  followed  butchering.  In  1845  ^^  came  to 
Pottsville,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  found  employment  with  Mr.  Spohn,  who 
had  a  meat  market  here  for  many  years.  Mr.  Yerger  finally  entered  the  busi- 
ness on  his  own  account,  and  continued  it  until  his  death,  in  1893.    He  married 


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702  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Esther  Shuck,  and  their  family  consisted  of  twelve  children:  Henry  is  the 
eldest;  Ellen,  born  May  26,  1845,  niarried  a  Mr.  Marshall;  Annie,  bom  April 
30,  1846,  married  Philip  Smith,  and  is  deceased;  Frank,  bom  Feb.  i,  1848,  is 
living  at  Norristown,  Pa.;  Charles,  born  Oct.  17,  1849,  died  in  Iowa;  Mary, 
bom  Feb.  7,  1853,  married  Edw.  Taylor,  of  Illinois ;  Alice,  bom  Jan.  16,  1855, 
married  a  Mr.  Applegate,  and  is  living  in  Iowa ;  Agnes,  twin  of  Alice,  is  un- 
married and  makes  her  home  at  Pottsville;  William  B.,  bom  Nov.  24,  1857, 
lives  near  Reading,  Pa.;  George,  bom  Feb.  2,  i860,  is  living  in  Iowa;  Sallie 
married  Thomas  C.  Williams,  of  Pottsville;  John,  bom  June  5,  1866,  died 
in  1913  in  Iowa. 

Henry  Yerger  was  but  one  year  old  when  his  parents  came  to  Pottsville, 
and  he  grew  up  here,  attending  the  public  school  during  his  boyhood.  He  found 
his  first  regular  employment  in  the  Snyder  foundry,  and  did  that  kind  of 
work  for  about  three  years.  He  then  spent  one  year  in  the  rolling  mill  at 
Palo  Alto,  was  at  the  car  shop  in  the  employ  of  the  Reading  Company  one 
year,  and  for  another  year  held  the  position  of  brakeman.  He  afterwards 
served  successfully  as  conductor  and  fireman,  and  in  1874  began  running  an 
engine,  continuing  with  that  company  in  that  capacity  until  his  retirement, 
April  I,  1914.  He  is  now  on  the  pension  list.  For  about  twenty  years  he  ran 
an  engine  on  the  Frackville  and  Mahanoy  division,  and  he  was  one  of  the 
oldest  engineers  on  the  road  at  the  time  of  his  retirement.  His  trustworthiness 
and  his  intelligent  attention  to  his  important  work  were  properly  valued  by  his 
employers.  He  is  a  member  of  Anthracite  Lodge,  No.  285,  F.  &  A.  M.,  and 
of  Mountain  City  Chapter,  No.  196,  R.  A.  M.,  of  Pottsville,  Pa.  By  reason  of 
his  service  in  the  Civil  war  Mr.  Yerger  is  entitled  to  membership  in  the 
G.  A.  R.,  belonging  to  Gowen  Post,  No.  23,  of  that  body,  as  well  as  to  Union 
Veteran  Legion,  No.  19,  of  which  he  is  a  past  colonel.  He  has  also  been  prom- 
inent in  the  "First  Defenders"  Association,  serving  as  president  in  1900.  and 
as  vice  president  from  1969  to  1914: 

On  April  18,  1861,  Mr.  Yerger  enlisted  in  Company  D,  25th  Regiment, 
National  Light  Infantry,  for  three  months,  under  Captain  McDowell,  being 
one  of  the  "first  defenders."  He  was  discharged  July  27,  1861,  at  the  expiration 
of  this  term,  and  reenlisted  Oct.  ist,  following,  for  three  years,  becoming  a 
member  of  Company  G,  48th  Pennsylvania  Regiment,  from  which  he  received 
his  discharge  Oct.  i.  1864.  From  Sept.  i,  1861,  to  Oct.  i,  1864,  it  was  attached 
to  Batteries  L  and  M,  3d  Artillery,  U.  S.  A.  Mr.  Yerger  received  one  slight 
wound  while  in  the  service,  being  wounded  at  Charleston,  W.  Va.,  in  the  right 
ankle.  In  1866  Mr.  Yerger  was  married  to  Sarah  Jane  Lashom,  daughter  of 
Daniel  Lashom,  who  was  a  native  of  Virginia.  Five  children  have  been  bom 
to  this  marriage :  William  D.  is  an  engineer  in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia 
&  Reading  Company,  and  resides  at  Reading,  Pa. ;  Morris  E.  is  a  member  of 
the  well  known  firm  of  Yerger  &  Jones,  clothiers  at  Pottsville ;  George  H.,  who 
lives  at  home,  is  a  machinist  in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Com- 
pany ;  Frank  H.  is  a  telegrapher  in  the  employ  of  the  Pennsylvania  Railroad 
Company ;  Mary  E.  is  the  widow  of  Harry  G.  Miller,  and  resides  at  home.  Mr. 
Yerger  has  served  as  a  member  of  the  council  of  Palo  Alto. 

ELWOOD  T.  FILER  has  been  a  recognized  influence  in  the  musical  circles 
in  Schuylkill  Haven  for  a  number  of  years,  devoting  practically  all  of  his  life 
to  such  interests,  for  he  is  not  only  a  musician,  but  also  engaged  in  business 
as  a  dealer  in  musical  instmments  and  such  merchandise.     Mr.  Eiler  is  the 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  703 

leader  of  the  Schuylkill  Haven  Band  and  also  plays  comet  in  the  Third  Brigade 
Band  of  Pottsville. 

The  Eiler  family,  to  which  Elwood  T.  Eiler  belongs,  traces  its  ancestry 
to  Johannes  Eyler,  who  was  bom  Dec.  6,  1772,  and  died  Dec.  21,  1843.  He 
settled  at  what  became  known  as  Eyler's  Hollow  (in  Pennsylvania  German  as 
"Noosadaul"),  in  North  Manheim  township,  Schuylkill  county,  followed  farm- 
ing, and  died  upon  his  farm,  and  is  buried  in  the  old  cemetery  at  Schuylkill 
Haven.  His  children  were:  John;  Daniel  (1811-1869)  ;  Henry;  Betsy,  wife  of 
Frank  Mellon;  and  Kate,  wife  of  Peter  Strause.  His  children  changed  the 
name  to  its  present  form. 

John  Eiler,  grandfather  of  Elwood  T.  Eiler,  and  son  of  John,  above,  was 
a  large  landowner  in  what  is  now  known  as  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  also  at  Eiler's 
Hollow.  He  was  born  on  the  homestead  in  North  Manheim  township,  and  died 
in  that  township  at  the  advanced  age  of  eighty-three  years.  He  leamed  the 
trade  of  carpet  weaver  and  followed  it  throughout  his  active  life.  His  wife, 
Hannah  (Schappell),  daughter  of  Jacob  Schappell,  died  at  the  age  of  forty-six 
years,  and  they  are  buried  in  the  old  cemetery  at  Schuylkill  Haven.  They  had 
the  following  family :  Mary  married  John  Bubeck ;  Maria  married  Levi  Reich- 
ert ;  Hannah  married  John  Krietzel,  who  was  killed  during  the  Civil  war,  while 
serving  as  a  member  of  the  48th  Pennsylvania  Regiment,  and  she  afterwards 
married  Samuel  Bonberger,  who  was  also  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war ;  Emaline 
married  Joseph  Freeman ;  Susan  married  William  Killian,  a  soldier  of  the  Civil 
war ;  Israel  died  while  serving  as  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war ;  Frank  is  the  father 
of  Elwood  T.  Eiler.     Three  children  died  young. 

Frank  Eiler,  son  of  John  and  Hannah  Eiler,  was  born  April  13,  1840,  in 
North  Manheim  township,  and  is  now  living  retired  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  after 
a  long  service  in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railroad  Company. 
He  began  work  for  that  company  as  a  switchman,  later  becoming  brakeman, 
and  three  years  afterwards  was  promoted  to  fireman,  finally  becoming  an 
engineer.  He  was  thus  engaged  for  thirty-five  years,  most  of  the  time  on  the 
Mine  Hill  road,  and  he  brought  the  old  yellow  cars  then  in  use  to  the  Mine 
Hill  crossing,  where  they  were  loaded  on  the  canalboats.  Thus  he  has  seen 
the  development  of  the  railroads  from  the  complicated  but  inferior  methods  of 
the  early  aays  to  the  splendid  system  now  in  operation.  Mr.  Eiler  was  retired 
by  the  company  April  13,  1910.  He  has  been  a  member  of  the  Philadelphia 
&  Reading  Veterans  since  the  organization  of  that  body,  and  has  also  belonged 
to  the  Relief  Association  since  its  organization.  Mr.  Eiler  married  Leah 
Baker,  daughter  of  John  Baker,  and  the  following  children  were  bom  to  their 
union :  Elwood  T.  Eiler  is  mentioned  below ;  Harry  and  Clayton  are  barbers 
at  Schuylkill  Haven ;  George  died  young ;  Frank  is  a  barber  and  music  dealer 
at  Spring  City,  Pa. ;  Robert,  also  a  barber,  is  located  at  Landingville,  Pa. ;  May 
is  married  to  Arthur  Rich,  of  Pottsville,  Pa.  The  mother  died  Dec.  11,  1909, 
and  is  buried  in  the  Union  cemetery  at  Schuylkill  Haven. 

Elwood  T.  Eiler  was  bom  Nov.  24,  1861,  and  obtained  his  education  in 
the  public  schools.  When  a  youth  he  learned  the  trade  of  barber,  which  he 
followed  until  1903.  He  has  since  been  in  business  at  Schuylkill  Haven  as  a 
dealer  in  musical  instmments  and  music,  selling  pianos,  player  pianos,  organs 
and  other  such  instruments,  phonographs  and  records.  Mr.  Eiler  has  made 
a  thorough  success  in  his  mercantile  venture,  his  understanding  of  the  require- 
ments of  his  customers  and  his  familiarity  with  music  fitting  him  to  accommo- 
date his  trade  to  the  best  advantage.    His  store  on  Main  street  is  up-to-date 


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704  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

and  well  stocked.  Mr.  Eiler  began  taking  violin  lessons  when  twelve  years  old, 
and  later  had  instruction  on  other  instruments,  and  has  become  an  accomplished 
performer.  He  organized  Filer's  Band,  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  which  had  an 
existence  of  about  eighteen  years,  and  was  its  leader  during  that  time.  Later 
he  became  the  leader  of  the  Schuylkill  Haven  Band,  which  he  is  still  conduct- 
ing, and  he  plays  the  cornet  in  the  Third  Brigade  Band,  of  Pottsville,  which 
was  led  by  the  late  Frederic  Gerhard  until  his  death;  Mr.  Braun  is  the  present 
leader.  For  the  last  twenty-seven  years  Mr.  Eiler  has  been  a  member  of  the 
choir  of  the  Second  Reformed  Church,  to  which  he  belongs,  and  has  taken  part 
in  all  the  local  enterprises  of  this  nature.  He  has  a  high  reputation,  his  work 
being  of  the  best  quality.  Socially  he  is  a  member  of  Page  Lodge,  No.  270, 
F.  &  A.  M.,  of  the  I.  O.  O.  F.  and  of  the  Sons  of  America. 

Mr.  Eiler  married  Annie  Rupp,  daughter  of  John  Rupp.  They  have  no 
children. 

Mrs.  Filer's  grandfather  brought  his  family  to  this  country  from  Germany, 
settling  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  where  he  died.  His  children  were:  Joseph, 
Thomas,  Mary,  Barbara  and  Jdin. 

John  Rupp,  the  father  of  Mrs.  Eiler,  was  bom  in  Wurtemberg,  Germany, 
and  came  to  America  with  his  patents.  He  learned  blacksmithing,  which  he 
followed  throughout  his  active  life  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  his  death  occurred 
there.  By  his  marriage  to  Charity  Reed,  daughter  of  Thomas  Reed,  he  had  the 
following  children :  Margaret,  who  married  Frank  Heiser ;  Joseph ;  and  Emma, 
Mrs.  Frank  Sterner.  For  his  second  wife  he  married  Catherine  Himmel,  and 
the  children  of  this  union  were:  Sarah,  Annie  (Mrs.  Eiler),  Barbara  (de- 
ceased), Elizabeth  (deceased),  Charles,  Thomas,  Frank  and  (jeorge. 

DAVID  VETTER,  one  of  the  best  known  citizens  of  New  Ringgold, 
Schuylkill  county,  is  now  living  retired  after  a  lifetime  of  useful  labor  in 
business  and  public  service,  assisting  his  fellow  citizens  in  the  upbuilding  of 
the  town  and  county,  to  whose  interests  he  has  become  deeply  attached  in  long 
years  of  intimate  association.  Mr.  Vetter  was  born  at  Pottsville,  Schuylkill 
county,  Feb.  22,  1843,  ^^^  *s  of  CJerman  lineage,  his  g^ndfather,  John  Vetter, 
having  spent  the  whole  of  his  life  in  Germany. 

John  Vetter,  father  of  David  Vetter,  was  bom  in  the  Grand  Duchy  of 
Baden  Feb.  26,  1815,  and  with  his  wife,  Mary  (Hetzel),  who  was  also  a  native 
of  (jermany,  emigrated  to  America  in  the  year  1828.  He  first  settled  in  the 
State  of  New  York,  and  in  1840  removed  to  Pottsville,  where  he  carried  on 
the  occupations  of  brickmaking  and  farming  until  1864.  In  the  latter  year  he 
moved  to  New  Ringgold,  where  both  he  and  his  wife  died,  the  former  on  Aug. 
8,  1885,  and  the  latter  on  April  20,  1883.  In  religious  association  Mr.  Vetter 
was  a  member  of  the  Lutheran  (Thurch.  He  had  a  family  of  six  children,  three 
sons  and  three  daughters,  all  of  whom  grew  to  maturity. 

David  Vetter  attended  school  at  Pottsville  and  soon  after  leaving  school 
became  employed  on  the  Schuylkill  and  Erie  canal  as  boatman.  When  the 
Civil  war  b^an  he  became  enthused  with  the  prospect  of  fighting  for  his  coun- 
try and  enlisted  on  Aug.  22,  1862,  in  Company  H,  120th  Regiment,  New  York 
Volunteers,  at  Kingston,  N.  Y.  This  regiment  was  assigned  to  the  2d  Brigade, 
2d  Division,  3d  Corps,  Army  of  the  Potomac,  with  which  he  served  until  the 
close  of  the  war,  participating  in  the  battles  of  Chancellorsville,  Fredericksburg, 
Cold  Harbor,  Wilderness,  Spbttsylvania,  Gettysburg,  and  others  of  minor  im- 
portance.   After  the  war  Mr.  Vetter  returned  to  New  Ringgold  and  learned 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  705 

tel^;raphy,  in  1870  entering  the  employ  of  the  Reading  Company,  and  serving 
for  over  twenty-one  years  as  night  operator.  In  1891  he  was  promoted  to  the 
position  of  station  agent  at  New  Ringgold,  which  he  held  until  he  was  retired, 
in  191 3,  with  a  pension,  after  a  continuous  service  of  over  forty-three  years 
with  the  company  at  that  point.  He  was  also  agent  for  the  United  States 
Express  Company  at  New  Ringgold.  Mr.  Vetter  was  formerly  a  Republican, 
but  soon  after  its  organization  joined  the  Washington  Progressive  party,  and 
was  its  candidate  for  sheriff  of  Schuylkill  county  in  1913,  being  defeated  by  a 
small  margin.  He  was  also  the  Washington  party  candidate  for  General  As- 
semblyman in  1914,  but  was  again  defeated  by  a  small  majority. 

Mr.  Vetter  was  elected  to  the  office  of  justice  of  the  peace  in  1878,  and  has 
served  continuously  in  that  position  ever  since.  He  was  a  member  of  the 
borough  school  board  for  thirty-five  years,  being  secretary  during  this  entire 
period  of  service,  and  was  a  member  of  the  borough  council  for  five  years.  He 
has  been  a  member  of  Washington  Camp  No.  100,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  for  forty- 
seven  years,  is  a  past  president,  has  been  recording  secretary  for  many  years, 
and  has  been  representative  to  the  State  camp  a  number  of  times.  He  has 
also  been  a  member  of  East  Brunswick  Lodge  No.  802, 1.  O.  O.  F.,  for  the  last 
forty-three  years,  is  a  past  grand,  and  has  held  all  the  offices  within  the  gift  of 
the  lodge.  By  virtue  of  his  Civil  war  service  he  is  a  member  of  the  G.  A.  R., 
having  been  connected  with  Doubleday  Post,  No.  189,  of  Tamaqua,  for  over 
thirty  years.  He  is  a  member  of  the  General  Council  branch  of  the  Evangelical 
Lutheran  Church,  has  held  all  the  church  offices,  and  is  also  interested  in  the 
Sunday  school,  having  been  superintendent  of  the  same  for  many  years,  and 
a  teacher  as  well. 

On  June  15,  1863,  Mr.  Vetter  married  Mary  C.  Hetzel,  a  daughter  of  John 
and  Christina  Hetzel,  of  Ulster  county,  N.  Y.,  and  to  them  were  bom  these 
children:  (i)  Sarah  Esther,  bom  Aug.  19,  1870,  married  Christian  Miller, 
formerly  of  Mahanoy  City,  now  an  employee  at  the  Bethlehem  Steel  Works, 
and  they  have  six  children,  Lottie,  Carrie,  Gertrude,  Ella,  Edward  and  Barbara, 
(2)  Mary  Rebecca,  born  April  27,  1873,  married  George  Sassaman,  at  one 
time  a  farmer  of  Bamesville,  this  county,  now  engaged  as  a  carpenter  at 
Tamaqua,  Pa.  They  have  two  children,  Goldie  and  Gladys.  (3)  Flora  Louisa, 
bom  April  27,  1873  (twin  of  Mary),  married  Alvin  Fussieman,  a  carpenter,  for 
a  time  a  resident  of  Slatington,  Lehigh  Co.,  Pa.,  now  of  Tamaqua,  Pa.  They 
have  two  children,  David  and  Clarence.  (4)  John  Howard,  bom  Oct.  2,  1875, 
a  shoemaker  of  Lititz,  Pa.,  married  Carrie  E.  Miller,  and  they  have  two  chil- 
dren, William  and  Mary  Ellen.  (5)  George  William,  bom  Aug.  14,  1878,  a 
telegraph  operator  at  Cbnnellsville,  Pa.,  is  married  to  Emma  Schwender,  and 
they  have  one  child,  Helen.  (6)  Katie  Magdalena,  born  Jan.  22,  1880,  married 
E.  R.  Neiswender,  station  agent  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Com- 
pany at  New  Ringgold,  Pa.,  and  they  have  one  child,  Florence.  (7)  Carrie 
Emma,  bom  May  10,  1884,  married  George  F.  Knittle,  State  health  officer  and 
telegraph  operator,  and  they  have  three  children,  Robert,  Miriam  and  Alma. 
(8)  Lottie  Pearl  Altie,  bom  April  27,  1889,  married  Walter  Neiswender,  a  lum- 
berman of  New  Ringgold,  and  they  have  two  children,  Mary  and  Dorothy.  All 
of  Mr.  Vetter's  children  were  bom  at  New  Ringgold  and  all  of  them  are  mem- 
bers of  the  Lutheran  Church. 

Mrs.  Mary  C.  (Hetzel)  Vetter,  wife  of  David  Vetter,  was  born  Nov.  3, 
1842,  at  Rondout,  near  Kingston,  Ulster  Co.,  N.  Y.,  was  educated  in  that  part 
Vol.  n— 7 


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706  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

of  the  Empire  State,  and  resided  at  home  until  her  marriage.  She  died  Sept. 
IS,  1912,  and  is  buried  at  the  Frieden's  Church,  New  Rin|[goId,  Pennsylvania. 
John  Hetzel,  father  of  Mrs.  David  Vetter,  was  bom  m  Germany,  and  by 
occupation  was  a  quarryman,  employed  at  the  Rosendale  Cement  Quarries  in 
Ulster  County,  N.  Y.  He  married  Christina  Steigmire,  and  they  had  the 
following  children :  John,  the  only  survivor  of  the  family,  is  a  boatman  on  the 
North  river  for  the  Delaware,  Lackawanna  &  Western  Railroad  Company  (he 
has  two  children) ;  Georee,  Mary  C.  and  William  are  deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Hetzel  were  members  of  the  Lutheran  Church.  Both  are  buried  at  Rondout, 
New  York. 

THEODORE  D.  SCHNEIDER,  proprietor  of  what  is  known  as  the 
Schneider  Pharmacy,  in  Pottsville,  has  been  operating  on  his  own  account  only 
a  short  time,  but  his  varied  experiences  with  responsible  drug  houses  covering 
a  lonff  period  of  his  business  life  should  be  a  sufficient  guaranty  that  he  is  well 
qualified  for  his  chosen  line.  He  has  recently  taken  over  the  old  established 
trade  of  George  G.  Hinterleitner. 

The  Schneiders  are  of  German  extraction.  Theodore  D.  Schneider,  the 
grandfather  of  Theodore  D.  Schneider,  was  born  in  Hanover,  Germany,  and 
when  a  young  man  left  his  country  to  escape  the  military  service,  taking  refuge 
in  France,  whence  he  sailed  for  America.  Locating  at  Ashland,  in  Schuylkill 
county.  Pa.,  he  became  engaged  as  a  butcher  and  drover,  established  a  large 
business,  and  remained  there  imtil  his  death. 

Lewis  Schneider,  father  of  Theodore  D.  Schneider,  was  bom  in  Schuylkill 
county.  Pa.,  and  passed  his  entire  life  here,  dying  in  September,  191 3.  From 
boyhood  he  was  associated  with  his  father  in  business  as  a  butcher  and 
drover,  continuing  to  follow  that  line  successfully  at  Ashland  all  his  life. 
Politically  he  was  a  Democrat,  and  active  in  party  and  political  affairs  in  his 
locality,  serving  ten  years  as  a  member  of  the  borough  council.  He  belonged 
to  the  German  Reformed  Church.  He  married  Clara  Hetherington,  whose 
father,  Jonathan  Hetherington,  was  an  Englishman,  who  was  engaged  in  the 
mule  and  mine  timber  business  at  St.  Clair,  Schuylkill  county,  later  moving 
to  Ringtown,  this  county,  where  he  followed  farming.  Mrs.  Schneider  is  still 
living,  at  Ashland,  Pa.  Two  children  were  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Schneider, 
namely :  Theodore  D.  and  Lottie,  the  latter  dying  when  six  years  old. 

Theodore  D.  Schneider  was  bom  at  Ashland  in  1880,  and  received  an 
excellent  education  in  the  public  schools  of  that  place,  graduating  from  the 
high  school  in  1898.  He  received  his  first  training  in  the  drug  business  under 
L.  C.  Voshage,  of  Ashland,  where  he  remained  for  eighteen  months.  His  next 
position  was  at  Sunbury,  where  he  was  in  the  employ  of  a  Mr.  Kelley  for 
three  years,  after  which  he  spent  four  months  at  Bellefonte,  Pa.,  and  five 
months  at  Harrisburg.  In  January,  1904,  Mr.  Schneider  came  to  Pottsville, 
where  he  spent  seven  years  in  the  employ  of  William  S.  Cowen.  His  next 
change  was  to  Hazleton,  Pa.,  where  he  was  connected  with  the  Eble  Pharmacy, 
as  manager,  for  two  years  and  three  months.  Returning  to  Pottsville,  he 
purchased  the  well  known  drug  store  of  George  G.  Hinterleitner,  at  No.  300 
North  Centre  street,  which  he  has  since  been  conducting.  Mr.  Schneider  has 
a  thorough  grasp  of  modern  business  methods,  has  kept  up  with  the  best  ideas 
in  his  particular  line,  and  has  a  high  sense  of  responsibility  attaching  to  his 
chosen  calling,  an  important  point  which  has  gained  him  the  absolute  confidence 
of  his  townsmen  in  Pottsville.    The  wide  acquaiiitance  and  high  reputation  he 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  707 

gained  during  his  association  with  Mr.  Cowen,  at  Pottsville,  haa  aided  him 
greatly  in  establishing  himself  since  he  started  business  on  his  own  account. 
Personally  he  is  regarded  as  an  excellent  citizen  in  every  respect,  and  is  highly 
thought  of  by  his  fellow  members  in  Ashland  Lodge,  No.  384,  B.  P.  O.  Elks, 
He  belongs  to  the  Reformed  Church.  Mr.  Schneider  is  an  independent  voter, 
supporting  the  candidates  he  thinks  best  fitted  for  the  office  and  the  measures 
which  in  his  opinion  will  confer  the  greatest  benefit  on  the  community. 

On  Sept.  16,  1913,  Mr.  Schneider  married  Elsie  L.  KHne,  daughter  of  Wil- 
liam H.  Kline.  Her  father  formerly  conducted  the  well  known  Kline's  cafe,  on 
Centre  street,  Pottsville ;  he  is  now  residing  at  Yellow  House,  Berks  Co.,  Pa. 
Mrs.  Schneider  was  bom  at  Farmersville,  in  Lancaster  county,  this  State. 

WALTER  WINFIELD  SCOTT,  a  prosperous  farmer,  owning  the  only 
farm  between  Pottsville  and  Schuylkill  Haven,  was  bom  Oct.  i,  1868,  at 
Wadesville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  son  of  John  Alexander  Scott.  The  family  is 
an  old  and  honored  one  in  England. 

John  Alexander  Scott,  father  of  Walter  W.  Scott,  was  bom  at  Greatbridge, 
Staffordshire,  England,  and  came  to  America  when  he  was  thirty-one  years 
of  age.  He  settled  at  Summer  Hill,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  was  employed  by 
a  man  named  Brown  in  a  small  mine  near  there.  He  then  went  to  Wadesville^ 
where  he  sank  the  first  mining  shaft  in  this  section,  by  contract,  the  superin- 
tendent of  the  mine  being  a  Mr.  Althouse.  After  a  time  Mr.  Scott  became 
mine  boss,  having  at  one  period  four  hundred  men  under  his  direct  super- 
vision. He  took  a  trip  to  his  old  home  in  England  after  a  number  of  years 
of  labor  in  the  mines,  and  upon  his  return  went  to  Wilkes-Barre,  Pa.,  where 
he  followed  mining  for  a  time,  but  eventually  retumed  to  the  Wadesville  shaft, 
remaining-there  until  1875.  Mr.  Scott  then  bought  the  old  Minnich  homestead 
of  seventy-three  acres  at  St.  Clair,  a  mile  above  Schuylkill  Haven,  on  the  main 
road,  and  there  followed  farming  until  his  death,  which  occurred  Aug.  30, 
1880,  at  Cape  Horn,  on  the  Reading  railroad,  through  an  accident.  He  is 
buried  in  the  borough  cemetery  at  St.  Clair. 

John  A.  Scott  was  married  to  Matilda  Reid,  daughter  of  Joseph  Reid.  She 
was  bom  half  a  mile  from  her  husband's  birthplace,  and  died  June  30,  191 2, 
and  is  buried  in  the  Charles  Baber  cemetery  at  Pottsville,  Pa.  The  following 
children  were  bom  to  John  A.  Scott  and  his  wife:  John  A.,  of  Schuylkill 
Haven;  Mary,  wife  of  William  Yeager,  of  Reading,  Pa.;  Walter  W.;  Ella; 
Frank ;  Edward ;  and  two  who  died  in  infancy. 

Walter  W.  Scott  was  born  at  Wadesville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  lived  upon 
his  father's  farm  imtil  he  was  twenty-seven  years  old.  He  then  obtained  a 
position  with  the  Atlantic  Refining  Company  at  Mount  Carbon,  where  he 
remained  for  two  years.  Returning  to  the  home  farm  he  spent  nine  months 
there,  after  which  he  accepted  the  position  of  assistant  farmer  at  the  county 
almshouse  farm,  continuing  there  for  one  year.  Again  he  retumed  home,  for 
one  year,  next  working  on  the  local  trolley  road  as  motorman,  for  seven  years, 
and  then  after  five  years'  residence  on  the  home  farm  he  reentered  the  service 
of  the  Atlantic  Refining  Company,  for  eight  and  a  half  months.  Having  ac- 
cimiulated  a  competency,  he  invested  in  land,  buying  first  the  f^imily  homestead 
of  sixty-eight  and  a  half  acres  in  1913,  and  also  thirteen  acres  of  the  old  Mellet 
farm,  and  ten  acres  of  the  John  Womer  tract,  adjoining.  Mr.  Scott  now  has 
one  of  the  finest  farms  in  the  county,  all  good  land,  and  the  only  one  on  the 
road  between  Pottsville  and  Schuylkill  Haven.     His  farm  and  buildings  are 


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708  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

kept  in  up-to-date  condition,  and  he  has  adopted  modern  methods  of  cultivating 
the  soil. 

On  Jan.  ii,  1898,  Mr.  Scott  was  married  to  Anna  Doretta  Kear,  daughter 
of  William  Kear,  and  they  have  had  children  as  follows :  Camilla  May,  Walter 
W.,  Elmer  N.,  Luther  R.  and  Mary  Matilda.  Mr.  Scott  is  a  Republican,  and 
has  served  upon  the  school  board  of  North  Manheim  township,  and  as  commit- 
teeman and  delegate  to  the  county  conventions.  He  and  his  family  attend 
the  Lutheran  Church. 

JEREMIAH  FESSLER,  one  of  the  most  respected  residents  of  Cressona 
borough,  now  living  retired,  was  bom  Jan.  28,  1845,  i^  Panther  valley,  Wayne 
township,  Schuylkill  coimty.  He  belongs  to  an  old  family  of  German  origin 
which  has  been  in  this  county  for  several  generations,  his  grandfather  having 
been  a  pioneer  in  Long  Run  valley,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  followed 
farming  and  lived  until  his  death.  He  was  twice  married,  by  the  first  union 
having  two  children,  Joseph  and  John,  and  his  second  wife,  whose  maiden  name 
was  Confer,  was  the  mother  of  the  following:  Andrew  died  in  Schuylkill 
county ;  Michael  died  in  Berks  county ;  Abraham  died  in  Shamokin,  Pa. ;  Wil- 
liam and  George  died  in  Schuylkill  county ;  Molly  married  Solomon  Luckenbill ; 
Rebecca  married  Daniel  Minich. 

Of  the  above  family,  William  Fessler,  well  known  in  his  day  as  **01d  Bill 
Fessler,"  was  the  father  of  Jeremiah  Fessler.  He  was  bom  in  Long  Run  valley. 
Living  in  this  section  in  the  pioneer  era  he  was  a  tjrpical  man  of  his  day,  a 
great  hunter  and  fisherman,  and  shot  several  deer  and  bear  in  the  Second  Moun- 
tain district  in  Pennsylvania.  He  did  railroad  work  during  the  early  days  of 
the  railroad  in  this  region,  being  one  of  the  first  men  employed  on  the  Mine 
Hill  road,  helping  to  lay  the  track,  later  hauling  coal,  and  still  later  acting  as 
roadmaster,  whidi  position  he  held  until  1866.  At  that  time  he  retired  to  his 
land,  owning  two  farms  in  this  section,  and  continued  to  live  there  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  when  he  was  eighty-five  years  old ;  he  is  buried  in  the 
Union  cemetery  at  Friedensburg,  this  county.  Few  men  in  this  part  of 
Schuylkill  county  were  better  or  more  favorably  known.  He  and  William  Lark 
built  the  Union  Church  at  Friedensburg,  and  he  never  lost  his  interest  in  church 
work,  in  which  he  took  an  active  part.  Politically  he  was  a  Republican.  In  his 
early  days  Cressona  was  known  as  West  Haven.  By  his  marriage  to  Elizabeth 
Luckenbill,  daughter  of  Solomon  Luckenbill,  he  had  a  large  family,  namely: 
WiUiam,  who  died  in  Wayne  township,  Schuylkill  county ;  Catherine,  who  died 
young;  four  who  died  in  infancy;  Esther,  deceased,  wife  of  George  Lark; 
George,  who  died  at  Cressona ;  Elias,  who  was  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war ;  Jere- 
miah, now  one  of  the  oldest  residents  of  Cressona ;  Elizabeth,  widow  of  William 
Breininger;  Henry  and  James,  who  live  in  Wisconsin;  Josiah,  a  resident  of 
Cressona ;  and  Amanda,  who  married  John  Lengle,  and  lives  at  Cressona.  The 
mother  of  this  family  lived  to  the  age  of  eighty  years. 

Jeremiah  Fessler  began  work  for  the  Mine  Hill  Railroad  Company  in  1858, 
and  when  the  Reading  Railway  Company  took  over  the  ownership  of  the  road 
continued  in  the  same  employ.  In  1864  he  became  fireman  on  the  engine  of 
a  passenger  train  on  the  Mine  Hill  road,  and  in  1873  was  promoted  to  engineer, 
in  which  capacity  he  was  engaged  until  1909.  In  191 1  he  was  pensioned,  and 
has  since  lived  retired  at  Cressona.  Mr.  Fessler  was  a  charter  member  of  the 
Reading  Relief  Association,  and  well  known  in  that  organization.  In  the 
course  of  his  industrious  life  he  has  made  many  friends  in  the  borough,  and  is 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  709 

highly  esteemed  by  all  who  know  him,  as  he  deserves  to  be.  Mr.  Fessler  is  a 
member  of  the  United  Evangelical  Church,  and  has  always  been  an  active 
and  interested  worker  in  that  direction.  For  over  fifteen  years  he  served  as 
superintendent  of  its  Simday  school. 

By  his  first  marriage,  to  Louisa  Kantner,  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Elizabeth 
(Snyder)  Kantner,  Mr.  Fessler  had  one  child,  Ida  May,  who  married  Dr. 
Frank  Merkle;  he  died  in  Bucks  county,  and  Mrs.  Merkle  now  resides  at 
Cressona  and  -is  engaged  as  a  public  school  teacher.  Mrs.  Louisa  Fessler  died 
when  twenty-seven  years  old,  and  Mr.  Fessler  subsequently  married  her  sister, 
Caroline  E.  Kantner,  by  whom  he  has  had  three  children :  Charles,  who  died 
when  seven  months  old;  Thomas  W.,  a  merchant,  of  Minersville,  Pa.;  and 
Beulah,  wife  of  Willard  Weaver,  of  Cressona. 

WILLIAM  MARDIS,  a  venerable  citizen  of  Pottsville,  now  living  in 
retirement,  has  been  a  resident  of  Schuylkill  coimty  since  1845.  He  was  bom 
Oct.  10,  1822,  in  Cambria  county.  Pa.,  son  of  Samuel  Mardis,  a  native  of  the 
State  of  Maryland  and  of  Scotch  descent.  Samuel  Mardis  followed  farming 
in  Cambria  county,  and  died  in  Indiana  county.  Pa.  To  his  marriage  with 
Abbie  Yost  were  born  the  following  children :  Joseph  died  in  Cambria  county ; 
John  died  in  California;  Jacob  died  in  Cambria  county;  James  is  a  resident  of 
Iowa ;  George  was  killed  by  a  robber  in  California ;  William  is  next  in  the  order 
of  birth ;  Samuel  died  young ;  Mary  and  Catherine  complete  the  family. 

William  Mardis  obtained  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Cambria 
county,  where  he  was  reared  upon  a  farm.  Coming  to  Schuylkill  county  in 
June,  1845,  he  settled  in  Mahanoy  township.  His  first  mine  work  was  in  the 
soft  coal  fields  of  the  AUeghenies.  For  one  year  he  was  in  the  employ  of  the 
State,  engaged  at  railroad  building  over  the  Allegheny  mountains.  Besides 
mining  in  Schuylkill  county,  he  assisted  in  building  the  Tremont  railroad,  and 
was  also  engaged  on  the  work  of  widening  the  old  Schuylkill  canal.  For 
twenty  years  he  carried  on  farming  on  his  own  account,  and  for  several  years 
conducted  a  dairy  business  at  Pottsville.  He  moved  to  that  borough  about 
twenty-eight  years  ago,  and  for  a  few  years  was  an  employee  at  the  Philadelphia 
&  Reading  shops,  since  which  time  he  has  been  variously  engaged.  Though  over 
ninety  years  old  Mr.  Mardis  is  remarkably  active,  and  he  is  able  to  read  without 
the  aid  of  glasses.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Methodist  Church,  and  he  has 
always  been  among  the  most  respected  residents  of  the  borough.  His  home  is 
at  No.  710  West  Market  street. 

Mr.  Mardis  married  Margaret  Hudson,  who  died  in  1886,  and  is  buried  in 
the  Odd  Fellows  cemetery  at  Pottsville.  They  had  one  daughter,  Catherine, 
who  is  the  wife  of  John  Mertz,  and  resides  on  East  Market  street,  Pottsville. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Mertz  have  one  son,  William  Mertz,  now  a  resident  of  Phila- 
delphia, Pa.,  who  married  a  Miss  Reikert ;  they  have  one  daughter,  Margaret. 

JOHN  W.  FREEMAN,  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  who  has  been  in  the  grocery 
business  at  Centre  and  Garfield  avenues  since  1907,  is  one  of  the  live  young 
business  men  of  the  borough,  and  has  shown  commendable  enterprise  in  the 
development  of  his  trade.  The  Freeman  family  is  an  old  and  honored  one 
in  Pennsylvania. 

•  Jurig  (George)  Freeman,  the  American  ancestor  of  the  family,  was  born 
in  Germany  in  1706,  and  came  to  this  country  in  his  thirty-third  year,  in  the 


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710  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

ship  "Samuel,"  commanded  by  Hugh  Percy,  landing  at  Philadelphia  Aug.  27, 
1739.    It  appears  that  he  settled  in  Cumru  township  some  time  after  1750. 

George  Freeman,  a  descendant  of  Jurig,  above,  was  bom  Jan.  10,  1783,  and 
died  in  1825.  He  married  Elizabeth  Gerhard,  bom  in  1786,  and  they  became 
the  parents  of  children  as  follows :  George,  born  Dec.  5,  1808;  John ;  Catherine, 
born  May  7,  181 1 ;  Jacob,  bom  Oct.  17\  1813;  Elizabeth,  bom  May  28,  1815; 
Benjamin,  bom  June  i,  1817;  Comelius,  bom  Nov.  29,  1819;  Peter;  and 
Samuel.  (It  seems  possible  the  son  John  of  this  family  was  the  great-grand- 
father of  John  W.  Freeman.) 

Johannes  (or  John)  Freeman,  great-grandfather  of  John  W.  Freeman,  was 
bom  in  Berks  county,  and  settled  in  Wayne  township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where 
he  followed  farming.  He  died  there,  and  is  buried  at  the  Summer  Mountain 
Church.  His  wife  was  Sarah  Fehr,  and  they  had  children  as  follows :  Joseph, 
William,  Jonathan,  Benjamin,  Mrs.  John  Reichert  and  Mrs.  Wert. 

Joseph  Freeman,  son  of  John,  was  bom  March  16,  1830,  in  Wayne  town- 
ship, Schuylkill  county,  leamed  the  trade  of  blacksmith,  and  followed  that 
calling  at  Schuylkill  Haven.  He  died  on  Centre  avenue,  in  that  borough,  and 
is  buried  in  the  Union  cemetery.  By  his  marriage  to  Emma  Eiler,  daughter 
of  George  Eiler,  he  had  the  following  children :  Sarah  married  Charles  Hoff- 
man ;  Emma  married  Adam  Moyer ;  Henry  is  living  at  Pottsville,  this  county ; 
John  is  mentioned  below;  Joseph  (2)  is  a  resident  of  Philadelphia,  Pa. ;  George 
and  Joseph  ( i )  are  deceased. 

John  Freeman,  son  of  Joseph,  was  born  Nov.  27,  i860,  at  Schuylkill  Haven, 
where  he  is  still  living.  For  several  years  he  was  engaged  in  boating  on  the 
Schuylkill  canal,  afterwards  entering  the  car  shops  in  the  borough,  where  he  is 
still  employed.  On  Dec.  29,  1884,  he  married  Clara  Shappell,,  daughter  of 
William  and  Sarah  (Ochenbach)  Shappell,  and  granddaughter  of  John  Shap- 
pell.  Three  children  have  been  bom  to  this  union :  John  W. ;  Mamie  S.,  wife  of 
John  Mengle,  living  at  Schuylkill  Haven ;  and  Sarah  A.,  who  died  when  nine 
days  old. 

John  W.  Freeman  was  bom  June  10, 1886,  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  obtained 
the  principal  part  of  his  education  in  the  public  schools  there.  He  has  also 
taken  a  course  at  the  Pottsville  business  college.  For  a  time  he  was  employed 
by  the  Walkover  Shoe  Company  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  on  Dec.  15,  1907, 
engaged  in  business  for  himself,  dealing  in  groceries,  dry  goods  and  notions. 
His  store  is  at  the  comer  of  Centre  and  Gadield  avenues,  and  he  has  a  very 
creditable  stock,  carrying  a  large  assortment  of  well  selected  goods,  which_ 
supply  the  needs  of  a  large  patronage.  Mr.  Freeman  deserves  his  prosperity, 
having  built  up  his  trade  by  unremitting  attention  to  the  wants  of  his  customers, 
accommodating  service  and  reliable  goods.  His  circle  of  patrons  is  widening 
steadily. 

Socially  Mr.  Freeman  belongs  to  the  Patriotic  Order  Sons  of  America  and 
the  Improved  Order  of  Heptasophs.  Politically  he  gives  his  support  to  the 
Democratic  party.  He  married  Grace  Violet  May  Donmoyer,  daughter  of 
Morris  W.  Donmoyer. 

G.  EDGAR  KLINE  has  proved  his  possession  of  stable  business  qualities 
in  the  management  of  the  hotel  and  cafe  at  Pottsville  which  receives  a  liberal 
share  of  the  local  patronage.  His  father,  who  operated  this  place  for  seven 
years,  had  a  long  and  successful  career  in  the  hotel  business  in  different  parts 
of  Pennsylvania,  and  the  son  had  the  benefit  of  first  hand  experience  from 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  711 

early  boyhood.  Its  value  may  well  be  inferred  from  his  intelligent  comprehen- 
sion of  the  requirements  of  the  business. 

The  Kline  family  are  of  old  Lancaster  stock.  Hiram  Kline,  grandfather 
of  G.  Edgar  Kline,  was  born  in  Lancaster  county,  Pa.,  and  lived  and  died 
there,  his  death  occurring  at  Lancaster  Dec.  26,  1885.  He  was  a  well-to-do 
farmer.  Hiram  Kline  married  Barbara  Beck,  who  still  survives.  Five  chil- 
dren were  bom  to  this  marriage :  William  H. ;  Emma,  born  Jan.  i,  1858,  the  wife 
of  Samuel  Miller,  a  farmer  in  Lancaster  county ;  Ezra,  who  was  born  Oct.  10, 
i860,  a  farmer  on  the  old  homestead  in  Warwick  township,  Lancaster  county; 
Hiram,  bom  Nov.  3,  1862,  also  a  farmer  in  Warwick  township;  and  Kate,  bom 
Jan.  21,  1865,  who  marriea  Horace  Sturgis  and  lives  in  the  town  of  Lititz. 

William  H.  Kline  was  born  Jan.  14,  1854,  at  Lititz,  Lancaster  county,  and 
received  a  public  school  education,  attending  in  the  home  locality  and  at  nearby 
town  schools.  He  was  reared  to  farming  and  followed  that  calling  during  his 
early  manhood,  until  three  years  ajFter  his  marriage.  His  next  venture  was  as 
a  merchant,  and  from  merchandising  he  turned  to  hotel  keeping,  being  so 
engaged  at  Farmersville  and  Lancaster  in  his  native  county  for  six  years. 
Moving  thence  to  the  vicinity  of  Pottsville,  he  conducted  the  "Tumbling  Run 
Hotel"  for  a  period  of  about  seven  years,  from  1892  to  1898,  and  was  the  first 
proprietor  there  to  have  a  license.  Mr.  Kline  was  next  located  at  Reading,  Pa., 
where  he  remained  for  three  years,  successfully  conducting  the  Spears  Cafe,  at 
No.  503  Penn  street,  which  attained  a  high  popularity,  during  his  ownership. 
In  1902  Mr.  Kline  came  to  Pottsville,  where  he  opened  a  hotel  and  cafe  which 
he  and  his  son,  in  turn,  have  since  kept  up.  Mr.  Kline  had  contemplated  remov- 
ing to  Pottsville  during  his  residence  at  Tumbling  Run,  which  gave  him  a 
chance  to  observe  the  business  in  the  borough,  and  his  experience  was  sufficient 
to  make  the  enterprise  a  success  as  long  as  he  handled  it.  Kline's  Cafe  under 
bis  management  became  the  most  popular  cafe  of  the  kind  in  the  town,  the 
quality  of  the  food  served  there  and  the  service  itself  attracting  many  who 
demand  the  best.  He  equipped  the  place  thoroughly  and  conveniently,  and 
during  the  seven  years  he  carried  it  on  kept  up  the  high  standard  which  he 
established  at  the  beginning.  Several  years  ago  he  gave  up  the  business,  and  has 
since  been  living  at  Yellow  House,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  has  a  farm  of 
seventy-five  acres. 

Mr.  Kline  was  married  Oct.  14,  1879,  ^^  Maggie  Bowman,  of  Ephrata, 
Lancaster  county,  daughter  of  George  L.  and  Fannie  (Steinmets)  Bowman. 
Mr.  Bowman  is  deceased.  Of  the  three  children  bom  to  Mr.  ana  Mrs.  Kline 
George  Edgar  is  the  eldest;  Elsie,  who  graduated  from  the  Reading  high  school, 
is  now  the  wife  of  Dr.  Theodore  D.  Schneider,  a  well  known  druggist  of  Potts- 
ville; William  McKinley,  who  lives  at  home,  was  bom  in  1897,  two  days  after 
the  inauguration  of  President  McKinley.  Mr.  Kline  is  a  Lutheran  in  religious 
faith,  while  his  wife  is  a  member  of  the  Reformed  Church.  Socially  he  belongs 
to  the  I.  O.  O.  P.,  Knights  of  Pythias,  Dramatic  Order  of  Knights  of  Khor- 
assan,  Pottsville  Gun  Club  and  the  Liederkranz. 

G.  Edgar  Kline  was  bom  Oct.  29,  1880,  in  Ephrata,  Lancaster  county,  and 
received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  the  various  localities  where  the 
family  resided  during  his  youth,  graduating  from  the  Pottsville  high  school 
when  sixteen  years  old.  He  assisted  his  father  from  boyhood,  thus  becoming 
familiar  with  the  details  of  the  hotel  business  from  an  early  age,  and  in  May, 
1910,  he  became  proprietor  of  Kline's  Cafe,  at  No.  18  South  Centre  street, 
Pottsville,  which  his  father  conducted  successfully  for  a  number  of  years.    He 


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712  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

succeeded  his  father  directly  in  the  ownership  of  this  place.  The  hotel  con- 
tains thirty  rooms,  including  several  dining  rooms,  the  restaurant  business  being 
still  the  specialty.  All  the  guest  rooms  are  very  desirable  and  well  kept  up, 
and  Mr.  Kline  has  the  faculty  of  making  the  traveling  public  feel  comfortably 
at  home  in  his  house.  He  has  kept  thoroughly  abreast  of  the  times  in  providing 
modem  conveniences  for  his  guests,  and  his  unflagging  zeal  in  catering  to  their 
wants  has  made  him  many  friends  among  his  patrons,  local  and  otherwise. 
Aside  from  his  hotel  business  Mr.  Kline  has  been  interested  in  the  raising  of 
fine  chickens,  and  has  been  highly  successful  in  this  field,  having  taken  many 
prizes  in  his  own  and  other  cities  with  his  Black  Orpingtcm  stock.  Though  he 
has  done  so  well  in  this  respect  and  has  become  widely  known  among  chicken 
fanciers,  he  has  followed  the  line  for  pleasure  only. 

Mr.  Kline  is  very  well  known  among  local  social  organizations,  belonging 
to  the  Elks  Lodge  at  Pottsville,  No.  207 ;  to  the  Fraternal  Order  of  Eagles ;  to 
the  Liquor  Dealers'  Association  of  Pennsylvania ;  and  to  the  Central  Republican 
Club,  Baxter  Club,  Turtle  Club  and  Pottsville  Game  and  Fish  Protective  Asso- 
ciation. 

J.  FRANKLIN  GEHRIG,  assistant  postmaster  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  was 
born  in  that  borough  Feb.  17,  1891,  son  of  George  E.  Gehrig.  He  belongs  to  a 
family  of  German  origin  which  has  long  been  established  in  Pennsylvania,- 
having  settled  in  Berks  county  at  an  early  date. 

John  Gehrig,  his  great-great-grandfather,  lived  at  Leesport,  Berks  Co.,  Pa., 
and  kept  hotel  at  that  point  while  the  turnpike  was  under  construction  in  that 
section.  He  died  there  in  1824.  His  children  were:  John,  George  E.,  Mrs. 
Beard  and  Mrs.  Sallie  Baker. 

George  E.  Gehrig,  son  of  John  Gehrig,  was  bom  at  Leesport,  Berks  Co., 
Pa.,  Jan.  17, 1801,  and  spent  his  early  life  in  Berks  county.  In  1829  he  removed 
to  Milton,  Pa.,  where  he  kept  the  "United  States  Hotel"  for  some  time  and 
later  engaged  in  the  milling  business,  which  he  continued  to  follow  for  a  number 
of  years.  His  death  occurred  in  1854.  His  wife,  Elizabeth  (Huey),  died  in 
1883.  They  had  these  children :  Jacob,  George,  B.  Frank,  Nice,  James,  Sophia, 
Joseph,  Isaac,  Albert,  Elizabeth,  Harrison  and  William. 

B.  Frank  Gehrig  was  bom  Oct.  25,  1832,  at  Milton,  Pa.,  and  attended  the 
public  schools  there.  When  a  young  man  he  learned  the  distilling  trade.  He 
came  to  Schuylkill  Haven  in  1852  and  clerked  for  three  and  a  half  years,  after 
which  he  engaged  in  the  clothing  and  notion  business,  continuing  same  with 
success  for  seven  years.  For  a  year  afterwards  he  shipped  coal,  and  was  then 
employed  in  the  shops  at  Schuylkill  Haven  for  one  year.  Then,  in  company 
with  David  Dreibelbis,  he  built  a  factory  and  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of 
soap,  Mr.  Gehrig  selling  out  to  his  partner  after  conducting  the  business  for 
one  year.  He  next  engaged  in  droving,  traveling  through  central  Pennsylvania 
buying  and  selling  stock,  and  was  so  occupied  for  several  years.  For  fifteen 
years  following  he  carried  on  farming  in  North  Manheim  township,  and  he 
has  since  lived  retired  except  for  his  duties  as  assessor  of  the  North  ward  of 
Schuylkill  Haven,  which  office  he  has  filled  for  the  last  sixteen  years.  For 
eighteen  years  he  was  a  member  of  the  borough  council,  his  long  continuance 
in  that  position  being  a  most  substantial  evidence  of  the  estimate  placed  upon 
his  services  by  his  fellow  citizens  and  their  confidence  in  his  trustworthiness 
and  ability  to  handle  the  affairs  of  the  borough.  Politically  he  is  a  Republican. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  Lutheran  Church. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  713 

Mr.  Gehrig  owns  the  old  John  Mackey  hotel  stand  at  Schuylkill  Haven, 
which  was  well  known  in  the  days  of  the  stagecoach.  It  is  still  a  fine  old 
building,  and  the  Gehrigs  have  a  comfortable  home  there.  He  married  Isabella 
Barr,  a  daughter  of  John  Barr,  formerly  of  Kutztown,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  later 
of  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  she  died  June  2,  1913.  They  had  a  family  of  six  sons : 
John  is  deceased ;  George  E.  is  mentioned  below ;  William  is  deceased ;  Harry 
is  at  home;  Robert  is  a  resident  of  Schuylkill  Haven ;  Edward  is  at  home. 

George  E.  Gehrig,  father  of  J.  Franklin  Gehrig,  was  bom  in  Schuylkill 
Haven  Nov.  i,  1861,  and  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  there.  He  worked 
for  a  time  as  a  woodchopper  with  the  Schuylkill  Navigation  Company,  later 
was  made  foreman  in  the  coal  storage  department  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading 
Coal  &  Iron  Company,  holding  that  position  for  a  considerable  period,  and  then 
became  car  inspector  ifor  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company  at  the 
Mine  Hill  Crossing,  Schuylkill  Haven;  he  is  now  a  foreman  in  the  Reading 
car  shops  at  that  place.  Mr.  Gehrig  was  married  to  Leonora  Gehrig,  who  was 
bom  Oct.  10,  1871,  a  daughter  of  J.  Brown  Gehrig,  a  coal  and  coke  dealer  of 
Milton,  Pa.  They  have  one  child,  J.  Franklin.  Mr.  Gehrig  is  a  Republican 
politically,  and  socially  a  member  of  Webster  Council,  No.  ^23,  Jr.  O.  U.  A.  M., 
of  Schuylkill  Haven,  of  which  he  is  a  past  councillor.  He  is  a  member  of  Christ 
Evangelical  Lutheran  Church,  member  of  the  church  council,  financial  secre- 
tary of  the  church,  and  has  also  been  active  in  the  work  of  its  Sunday  school. 

J.  Franklin  Gehrig  was  educated  in  the  grammar  and  high  schools  of  Schuyl- 
kill Haven,  and  Pottsville  business  college,  after  which  he  spent  about  three 
years  as  a  knitter  in  the  underwear  mills  of  the  borough  of  Schuylkill  Haven, 
first  with  D.  D.  Coldren  and  lastly  with  Jere  Lautenbacher.  On  March  i, 
1910,  he  entered  the  post  office  at  Schuylkill  Haven  as  assistant  postmaster, 
which  position  he  has  since  filled  with  satisfaction  to  all.  On  Sept.  28,  1913,  he 
was  appointed  a  member  of  the  board  of  civil  service  examiners. 

Mr.  Gehrig  was  married  to  Sarah  M.  Cripple,  who  was  bom  June  28, 
1894,  daughter  of  George  W.  and  Araminta  (Sierer)  Cripple,  natives  of  West 
Fairview,  Pa.  They  have  one  child,  Earl  A.  Mr.  Gehrig  is  an  adherent  of 
the  Republican  party.  He  holds  membership  in  Page  LcSge,  No.  270,  F.  & 
A.  M. ;  Mountain  City  Royal  Arch  Chapter,  No.  196 ;  Webster  Council,  No.  23, 
Jr.  O.  U.  A.  M. ;  Washington  Camp  No.  47,  P.  O.  S.  of  A. ;  and  Conclave  No. 
1087,  I.  O.  of  H.  He  belongs  to  Christ  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  of 
Schuylkill  Haven,  and  is  pianist  of  the  Sunday  School. 

THOMAS  B.  GOLDEN,  the  present  proprietor  of  the  "New  Park  Hotel," 
is  a  well  known  citizen  of  Pottsville  and  of  Schuylkill  county  as  well,  having 
been  associated  as  player  and  manager  with  local  baseball  teams  for  a  number 
of  years.    He  is  a  son  of  William  D.  Golden,  a  native  of  England. 

William  D.  Golden  came  to  America  when  twenty-two  }rears  of  age.  He 
first  settled  at  Pottsville,  Pa.,  being  engaged  as  a  mining  engineer.  Removing 
to  Canada  he  lived  there  for  a  time,  but  retumed  to  Pennsylvania  in  1874, 
locating  at  Stockton.  In  1877  he  went  to  Springfield,  III.,  where  he  remained 
until  his  death.  Before  coming  to  America,  he  married  Sarah  Wilkinson,  and 
to  them  were  bom  seven  children,  of  which  the  youngest  is  Thomas  B. 

Thomas  B.  Golden  attended  the  public  schools  and,  while  still  a  boy,  began 
work  at  a  breaker,  as  a  slate  picker.  He  worked  about  the  mines  for  several 
years,  later  leaming  the  trade  of  watchmaker.  In  1887  he  began  playing  ball 
as  a  professional,  a  contract  with  one  of  the  major  league  teams  bringing  him 


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714  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

East.  In  1894  he  came  to  Pottsville  to  play,  and  has  managed  teams  for  both 
Pottsville  and  Reading  during  the  existence  of  the  Atlantic  League.  In 
September,  1910,  Mr.  Golden  bought  the  "Park  Hotel,"  which  he  has  renovated 
and  improved.  It  comprises  sixty  rooms,  equipped  for  comfortable  service  to 
patrons.  Mr.  Golden's  sociable  nature  and  obliging  disposition  have  won  him 
many  friends  wherever  he  has  gone.  Fraternally  he  is  a  member  of  the  local 
lodge  of  the  B.  P.  O.  Elks.  He  is  a  citizen  of  unquestioned  worth  and  thor- 
oughly esteemed  in  his  home  city. 

Mr.  Golden  married  Emma,  daughter  of  Henry  and  Margaret  D.  Schwartz- 
hans,  of  Aurora,  111.  They  have  had  the  following  children :  Sarah  (a  teacher 
in  the  public  schools  of  Pottsville),  Thomas,  William,  Harry  and  Norman. 

IRVIN  W.  EMERICH,  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  is  a  native  of  South  Manheim 
township,  Schuylkill  county,  and  a  descendant  of  one  of  the  old  settled  families 
of  this  r^on.  His  grandfather,  Jacob  Emerich,  lived  in  South  Manheim  town- 
ship, where  he  was  a  pioneer,  and  followed  farming  on  the  place  where  he  con- 
tinued to  reside  until  his  death.  He  is  buried  in  the  Summer  Hill  cemetery. 
His  children  were  Morgan,  Jacob,  Jonathan  and  Joshua. 

Joshua  Emerich,  father  of  Irvin  W.  Emerich,  was  bom  in  South  Manheim 
township,  Schuylkill  county,  and  died  in  that  township  Oct.  5,  1895.  He  did 
day's  work  and  was  a  man  of  industrious  habits,  respected  by  all  his  neighbors. 
By  his  marriage  to  Pietta  Gruber  he  had  children  as  follows :  Nathan,  who  is 
deceased ;  Nathaniel,  deceased ;  Filmore,  who  died  when  seventeen  years  old ; 
Reuben,Na  resident  of  Pottstown,  Pa. ;  Alvin,  living  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  Pa. ; 
Irvin  W. ;  Lyman,  who  died  in  1898;  Sydney,  living  in  Reading,  Pa.;  Kate,  of 
Schuylkill  Haven ;  Deborah,  who  died  young ;  and  Alida,  of  Schuylkill  Haven. 

Irvin  W.  Emerich  was  bom  Jan.  19,  1870,  and  was  reared  in  his  native 
township,  where  he  attended  public  school.  Until  nineteen  years  old  he  was 
employed  among  the  farmers  of  the  district,  in  1890  starting  thebusiness  of 
painting  and  paperhanging  which  he  has  followed  ever  since.  He  is  estab- 
lished in  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  has  built  up  an  excellent  business,  having  a 
steady  patronage  which  requires  the  services  of  several  men.  Mr.  Emerich  ,has 
kept  up-to-date  in  his  work,  and  has  made  every  effort  to  give  his  patrons  desir- 
able service,  and  they,  in  turn,  have  shown  substantial  appreciation  of  his 
enterprise.  Personally  he  has  the  respect  of  all  his  associates.  He  is  a  member 
of  Page  Lodge,  No.  270,  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Schuylkill  Haven ;  of  the  I.  O.  O.  F., 
and  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  In  religious  connection  he  is  a  member  of  the  Reformed 
Church.  In  politics  he  is  independent,  supporting  the  men  and  measures  he 
considers  the  most  desirable  regardless  of  party  lines. 

Mr.  Emerich  married  £mma  Moyer,  daughter  of  William  J.  Moyer,  of 
South  Manheim  township,  Schuylkill  county,  and  they  have  two  children: 
Edith,  a  graduate  of  the  Schuylkill  Haven  high  school,  and  of  the  Keystone 
State  Normal  School  of  Kutztown,  Pa.,  is  now  a  public  school  teacher  at 
Schuylkill  Haven ;  Sallie,  also  a  graduate  of  the  Schuylkill  Haven  high  school, 
lives  at  home  and  is  engaged  in  sewing.    The  family  reside  on  Canal  street. 

NEWTON  M.  WONDERS,  of  Pottsville,  has  been  one  of  the  most  popular 
photographers  in  this  part  of  Schuylkill  county  for  over  twenty-five  years. 
Photography  has  been  his  life  work,  and  as  he  has  gone  in  for  all  the  different 
branches  of  the  art  he  has  been  able'to  keep  in  touch  with  the  advances  of  the 
business,  besides  acquiring  a  varied  experience  of  the  greatest  value.    Though 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  715 

he  has  done  well  from  the  commercial  standpoint,  his  success  has  meant  more 
than  mere  material  prosperity,  for  he  has  natural  taste  for  his  chosen  calhng 
which  has  developed  along  with  his  proficiency,  and  he  finds  keen  enjoyment  in 
his  vocation  and  the  great  progress  which  has  culminated  in  recent  years  in  un- 
dreamed of  accomplishments. 

Mr.  Wonders  was  bom  in  New  Franklin,  Stark  Co.,  Ohio,  Oct.  17,  1862. 
His  father,  Peter  D.  Wonders,  was  a  native  of  Berks  county,  Pa.,  and  settled 
in  Stark  coimty,  Ohio,  dying  at  Alliance,  that  county,  in  1877.  By  occupation 
he  was  a  carpenter  and  cabinetmaker.  He  married  Fredericka  Bammerlin,  who 
was  bom  in  Berlin,  Germany,  and  is  still  living,  at  the  age  of  over  ninety  years, 
making  her  home  in  Qeveland,  Ohio.  Of  the  twelve  children  bom  to  them 
five  are  deceased,  namely :  Mrs.  Lucy  L.  McGlone,  who  died  in  1898  at  Los 
Angeles,  Cal. ;  Allen,  who  died  of  fever  while  serving  in  the  Union  army  during 
the  Civil  war,  in  his  twenty-first  year;  Emma  J.,  who  died  when  eighteen 
years  old ;  and  Florence  and  Louise,  who  died  in  infancy ;  Lafayette  is  a  resident 
of  Alliance,  Ohio;  Benton  M.  Uves  in  Cleveland;  Mrs.  Marietta  Thomas,  in 
Qeveland;  Frances  M.  lives  at  Frankfort,  Ind.;  Mrs.  Laura  P.  Teeters  is  a 
resident  of  Cleveland ;  Solon  L.  is  at  Baltimore,  Md. ;  Newton  M.  completes  the 
family. 

Newton  M.  Wonders  had  common  school  advantages,  attending  at  Alliance, 
Ohio.  His  school  days  over  he  commenced  work  for  his  brother,  who  was  in 
the  photographic  business,  becoming  well  grounded  in  the  details  of  the  work 
during  this  association.  Subsequently  for  a  time  he  was  located  at  Cleveland, 
Ohio,  and  he  afterwards  spent  three  years  in  Chicago,  111.,  and  three  years  at 
Lebanon,  Pa.,  before  coming  to  Pottsville.  He  has  been  established  here  since 
1891,  in  which  year  he  purchased  his  studio,  the  location  being  at  No.  10  West 
Market  street  until  he  removed  to  his  present  quarters,  No.  7  South  Centre 
street.  Mr.  Wonders  has  built  up  a  large  business  by  strict  attention  to  the 
wants  of  his  customers,  and  by  giving  them  the  best  that  photography,  as  it  is 
now  understood,  offers.  He  has  probably  the  largest  clientele  in  this  section, 
and  deservedly.  Mr.  Wonders  is  a  member  of  the  National  Photographers' 
Association  of  America. 

In  1889  Mr.  Wonders  was  united  in  marriage  with  Anna  E.  Weitzel,  of 
Lebanon,  Pa.,  daughter  of  H.  P.  and  Emma  E.  Weitzel,  both  of  whom  are 
deceased.  Three  children  have  been  born  to  this  union:  Dorothy,  who  died 
when  eight  years  old ;  and  Jettie  L.  and  Henry  P.,  surviving.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Wonders  are  members  of  the  English  Lutheran  Church. 

JOHN  H.  LENGEL,  who  is  now  serving  as  president  of  the  school  board 
of  the  borough  of  Cressona,  has  given  his  fellow  citizens  excellent  service  in 
that  capacity.  He  is  a  man  of  estimable  character,  a  member  of  a  family  which 
has  been  well  and  favorably  known  in  Schuylkill  county  for  several  generations, 
his  grandfather,  John  Lengel,  living  and  dying  in  Washington  township,  this 
county,  near  Hetzel's  Church,  where  he  is  buried.  By  occupation  he  was  a 
farmer,  one  of  the  prosperous  men  of  his  day,  owning  three  large  farms.  His 
children  were:  John,  Reuben,  Adam,  David,  Daniel,  Mrs.  Catherine  Zimmer- 
man, Mrs.  Rebecca  Zimmerman  and  Mrs.  Sarah  Hein. 

Daniel  Lengel,  son  of  John,  was  bom  in  Washington  township,  and  learned 
the  trade  of  wheelwright.  He  was  also  a  farmer  for  many  years,  in  his  later 
life  settling  at  Friedensburg,  this  county,  where  he  conducted  a  shop,  following 
his  trade  while  living  there.    He  died  at  Friedensburg  when  seventy-two  years 


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716  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

old,  and  is  buried  at  Cressona,  where  his  wife  also  rests.  She  too  passed  away 
at  the  age  of  seventy-two  years.  Her  maiden  name  was  Catherine  Berkheiser, 
daughter  of  William  Berkheiser.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Lengel  had  a  family  of  seven 
children:  Mary,  deceased,  who  was  the  wife  ^of  Peter  C.  Bittle;  John  H.; 
Daniel,  Kate  and  Sallie,  all  three  of  whom  died  young ;  Charles,  deceased ;  and 
Carrie,  who  married  John  Heffner  and  (second)  Oscar  Bemheisel. 

John  H.  Lengel  was  born  Dec.  29,  1861,  in  Washington  township,  this 
county,  and  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Cressona.  lie  was 
reared  upon  the  farm,  where  he  remained  imtil  twenty  years  old,  in  1882 
entering  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company,  as  a 
track  repairman.  By  efficient  work  he  was  promoted  from  time  to  time,  and 
is  now  an  engineer,  which  position  he  has  held  for  over  twenty  years.  Since 
1892  he  has  been  running  between  St.  Clair  and  Philadelphia.  His  home  is 
at  Cressona.  Mr.  Lengel  has  always  been  interested  in  local  activities,  being 
a  member  of  Phoenix  Lodge,  No.  75,  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Phoenixville,  and  of  the 
Independent  Order  of  Americans,  and  in  politics  he  is  associated  with  the 
Washington  party.  His  principal  work  in  public  affairs  has  been  along  the  line 
of  improvements  in  the  school  system,  and  he  has  been  faithful  to  his  duties  as 
member  of  the  school  board,  on  which  body  he  has  been  serving  since  191 1. 

In  1884  Mr.  Lengel  married  Amanda  Fessler,  daughter  of  William  Fessler, 
of  Cressona,  and  member  of  a  pioneer  family  of  this  locality.  They  have 
three  children :  Florence,  James  and  Daniel,  all  of  whom  are  at  home  with  their 
parents. 

CHARLES  F.  LONG  was  engaged  during  his  earlier  years  at  mining,  a 
vocation  which  occupies  a  large  proportion  of  the  workers  in  Schuylkill  county, 
but  for  a  number  of  years  past  he  has  been  a  hotel  proprietor,  now  success- 
fully ^conducting  the  "United  States  Hotel"  at  Minersville.  Under  his  capable 
management  it  has  become  one  of  the  leading  hotels  in  the  borough. 

Mr.  Long  is  of  German  parentage,  his  father,  Charles  Long,  having  been 
bom  in  Prussia,  about  forty  miles  from  Berlin.  He  served  in  the  Carman 
army  in  1848,  and  was  shot  in  the  leg  while  marching  through  Poland.  After 
his  dischaiige  from  the  service  he  came  to  America,  in  18^,  and  settled  at 
Wiconisco,  Dauphin  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  passed  the  remainder  of  his  life.  After 
coming  to  this  country  he  followed  mining,  and  he  died  in  Dauphin  county, 
where  he  is  buried,  at  Lykens.  His  wife,  Christian  (Seifert),  was  a  native  of 
the  same  place  as  her  husband,  died  at  Wiconisco,  and  is  also  buried  at  Lykens. 
Of  the  six  children  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Charles  Long,  Otto  and  one  sister 
continue  to  reside  on  the  old  homestead  at  Wiconisco. 

Charles  F.  Long  was  born  July  6,  1862,  at  Lykens,  Dauphin  county.  His 
early  advantages  were  meager,  for  though  he  attended  the  common  schools 
he  was  only  eight  years  old  when  he  commenced  to  pick  slate  at  the  Big  Lick 
colliery,  at  Williamstown,  Dauphin  county.  As  he  grew  up  he  was  given 
different  kinds  of  work  at  the  mines,  advancing  himself  steadily  by  applica- 
tion to  his  duties,  and  he  subsequently  took  a  course  on  mining  at  the  Scranton 
Correspondence  Schools,  which  assisted  him  greatly  in  his  work.  For  several 
years  Mr.  Long  was  inside  foreman  at  the  Silberton  colliery,  and  was  later 
similarly  employed  at  the  Buck  Run  colliery,  where  he  did  his  last  work  as 
a  miner.  In  1902,  having  decided  to  change  his  calling,  he  purchased  the 
"Decort  Hotel"  at  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  county,  which  he  conducted  for  two 
years,  in  Febmary,  1904,  buying  the  "United  States  Hotel"  at  Minersville,  to 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  717 

which  he  has  since  given  all  his  time.  Mr.  Long  has  proved  himself  well 
adapted  for  this  business,  and  the  hotel  has  continued  to  draw  a  profitable 
patronage  since  he  took  charge.  He  has  become  very  favorably  known  in  the 
borough  as  a  straightforward  business  man,  and  personally  has  the  good  will 
of  a  wide  circle  of  acquaintances.  Mr.  Long  was  made  a  Mason  Sept.  28, 
1890,  belonging  to  Ashlar  Lodge,  No.  570,  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Lykens,  PennsyU 
vania. 

Mr.  Long  married  Amelia  Kendter,  daughter  of  George  Kendter,  of  Tre- 
mont,  Schuylkill  county,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  six  children,  namely: 
Edward,  now  of  Pottsville,  this  county ;  and  Arthur,  John,  Otto,  Matilda  and 
Alma,  at  home. 

WILLIAM  FRANCIS  GERHARD,  of  Orwigsburg,  is  one  of  the  best 
known  residents  of  the  lower  end  of  Schuylkill  county.  As  an  agriculturist  he 
has  been  thoroughly  successful  in  cultivating  a  very  valuable  piece  of  property 
in  North  Manheim  township  and  he  has  also  undertaken  other  work,  as  oppor- 
tunity offered,  his  industrious  nature  and  proved  reliability  being  appreciated 
wherever  he  has  been  employed. 

Mr.  Gerhard  was  bom  March  11,  1855,  in  West  Brimswick  township,  son 
of  Henry  Gerhard  and  grandson  of  Henry  Gerhard.  His  great-grandfather, 
Jacob  Gerhard,  was  bom  in  Germany,  and  on  coming  to  America  when  a 
young  man  settled  at  Rehrersburg,  in  Tulpehocken  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa., 
where  he  followed  farming  and  his  trade,  that  of  wheelwright.  He  lived  there 
until  his  death.  His  children  were:  Peter,  Heinrich  (Henry),  John,  Jaccrf), 
William,  Catherine,  Lydia,  Polly,  Sarah,  Elizabeth  and  Lavina. 

Heinrich  (Henry)  Gerhard,  grandfather  of  William  Francis  Gerhard,  born 
May  I,  1798,  at  Rehrersburg,  die'd  Nov.  22,  1871.  Like  his  father  he  was  a 
fanner  and  wheelwright.  Coming  to  Schuylkill  county  in  1828,  he  bought  a 
farm  in  West  Brunswick  township  April  5th  of  that  year,  the  old  Abraham 
Werner  property,  comprising  263  acres,  155  perches.  He  continued  to  farm 
there  the  rest  of  his  life,  dying  at  that  place,  and  is  buried  in  the  Reformed 
cemetery  at  Orwigsburg.  His  wife,  Maria  Sarah,  daughter  of  Philip  and 
Mana  (Gilbert)  Hoy,  was  bom  in  1800,  and  died  in  1863,  at  the  age  of  sixty- 
three  years,  nine  months,  twenty-three  days.  They  were  the  parents  of  six 
children:  Maria,  who  married  Daniel  Alspach;  Sarah,  Mrs.  Samuel  Yost; 
Henry ;  Priscilla,  who  married  James  Anderson  and  (second)  Edward  Mengel ; 
William;  and  Edward,  the  last  named  dying  young. 

Henry  Gerhard,  father  of  William  F.  Gerhard,  was  born  Aug.  25,  1829,  in 
West  Bnmswick  township,  in  the  house  where  he  still  resides.  Part  of  this 
house  was  standing  when  his  parents  moved  here,  his  father  adding  to  it  subse- 
quently. Mr.  GeAard  has  been  living  retired  since  191 2.  He  attended  school 
in  the  neighborhood,  and  farmed  throughout  his  active  years.  After  the  death 
of  his  father  he  bought  148  acres  of  the  home  property,  his  brother  William 
taking  eighty-three  acres,  and  their  brother-in-law,  Daniel  Alspach,  also  owning 
a  tract.  The  latter  engaged  in  the  undertaking  business.  While  the  cultivation 
of  the  property  was  under  Mr.  Gerhard's  direct  management  he  was  one  of  the 
prominent  farmers  in  his  vicinity  and  attended  the  markets  of  Schuylkill  Haven, 
Pottsville  and  Orwigsburg,  where  he  was  known  as  a  thoroughly  reliable  dealer, 
all  his  transactions  being  above  reproach.  He  is  a  Democrat,  serving  many 
years  as  school  director  of  his  township,  and  was  one  of  the  prominent  members 


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718  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

of  the  Reformed  Church,  in  which  he  held  the  offices  of  elder  and  deacon  for 
many  years. 

On  June  19,  1852,  Mr.  Gerhard  married  Diana  Mengel,  who  died  Jan.  3, 
1857.  She  was  the  mother  of  three  children:  Charles,  born  July  16,  1853, 
died  Oct.  8,  1854;  William  Francis ;  and  Diana,  born  Nov.  5,  1856,  died  Nov.  10, 
1857.  O^  Nov.  5,  1859,  Mr.  Gerhard  married  (second)  Eliza  Yost,  daughter 
of  Samuel  and  Betsy  (Merkel)  Yost.  Eleven  children  have  been  bom  to  this 
union,  as  follows:  Elwood  P.,  born  May  31,  i860,  is  living  in  Port  Carbon; 
Mary  E.,  bom  Aug.  2,  1862,  is  married  to  Joel  Degler,  and  lives  at  Orwigsburg; 
Henry  Y.,  born  Oct.  5,  1864,  is  a  shoe  manufacturer  of  Orwigsburg ;  Samuel, 
bom  April  6,  1867,  died  aged  nine  years;  Frank,  bom  Feb.  5,  1869,  is  a  farmer 
of  West  Bmnswick  township;  Emma  M.,  bora  Feb.  22,  1871,  married  Jacob 
Zuber,  and  is  living  at  Allentown,  Pa. ;  George  A.,  bom  April  11,  1873,  is  a  shoe 
manufacturer  at  Orwigsburg,  with  his  brother;  John,  bom  March  11,  1875,  is 
farming  at  Orwigsburg;  Calvin  L.,  bom  July  2,  1876,  is  farming  in  the  borough 
of  Orwigsburg;  Hannah  S.,  bom  Jime  20,  1881,  married  George  Seltzer,  and  is 
living  at  McKeansburg,  Schuylkill  county;  and  Edwin  R.,  born  Oct.  20,  1884, 
is  farming  the  homestead  place  in  West  Brunswick  township. 

William  Francis  Gerhard  attended  the  public  schools  of  the  township  and 
remained  at  home  until  twenty-one  years  old.  At  that  time  he  located  in 
Orwigsburg  and  undertook  the  cultivation  of  his  father-in-law's  farm,  carrying 
it  on  until  Mr.  Moyer's  death.  He  now  has  fifty  acres  of  the  place  and  thirty- 
six  acres  purchased  from  Daniel  Moyer,  and  he  operates  the  place  very  profit- 
ably, his  up-to-date  methods  of  cultivation  having  brought  it  to  a  most  desirable 
state.  Mr.  Gerhard  is  also  engaged  in  hauling  coal,  doing  considerable  in  this 
line,  and  he  is  a  busy,  prosperous  man,  well  liked  and  respected  in  the  com- 
munity where  he  has  had  so  creditable  a  career.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Evan- 
gelical Church,  and  has  always  taken  an  active  part  in  its  work,  at  present  serv- 
mg  as  trustee  and  class  leader.  Socially  he  holds  membership  in  the  P.  O. 
S.  of  A. 

Mr.  Gerhard  married  Susanna  Moyer,  daughter  of  George  K.  and  Susanna 
(Hoy)  Moyer,  and  they  reside  at  the  old  homestead  of  her  parents.  Two  chil- 
dren have  been  bom  to  them :  Laura  died  when  two  years  old ;  Sadie  married 
Ralph  Kauffman,  and  has  two  children,  Marie  and  Leroy.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
KauflFman  reside  with  her  parents. 

PAUL  R.  NAFFIN,  one  of  the  rising  young  business,  men  of  Schuylkill 
Haven,  where  he  is  engaged  in  general  contracting  and  is  proprietor  of  the 
roller  skating  rink,  was  born  Jan.  24,  1886,  at  Colwalk,  Pommern,  North  Ger- 
many, and  is  a  son  of  Albert  Naffin. 

Albert  Naffin,  the  father,  was  bom  May  20,  1844,  in  Germany,  where  he  was 
a  contractor  and  builder.  He  came  to  America  with  his  family,  landing  at 
Pier  No.  53,  Philadelphia,  July  27,  1896,  and  soon  thereafter  located  in  Reading, 
Pa.  Remaining  in  Reading  until  July  4,  1897,  he  then  retumed  to  Germany, 
where  he  remained  until  November,  1912.  Coming  back  to  America  at  that 
time  he  stayed  in  this  country  only  until  Sept.  27,  191 3,  when  he  again  went 
back  to  his  Fatherland,  dying  there  Dec.  12,  1913,  at  the  age  of  sixty-nine.  He 
is  buried  at  Belgard,  Germany.  Mr.  Naffin  was  married  to  Wilhelmina,  daugh- 
ter of  Frederick  Rabe,  and  a  native  of  the  same  county  as  her  husband,  bom 
Dec.  3,  1848.  She  is  now  residing  at  Schuylkill  Haven.  To  Albert  and  Wil- 
helmina Naffin  were  bom  five  children :     Theodore,  living  at  Riverside,  N.  J. ; 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  719 

William,  living  at  Camden,  N.  J.;  Paul  R.;  Gustave,  residing  in  Schuylkill 
Haven ;  and  Frieda,  residing  at  home. 

Paul  R.  Naffin  was  but  ten  years  old  when  his  father  came  to  America.  He 
had  obtained  some  schooling  in  Germany,  to  which  he  has  since  added  by  study 
and  observation.  His  first  work  was  in  the  Mohns'  hat  factory,  at  Reading, 
Pa.,  where  he  remained  for  about  five  years.  He  then  went  to  the  Reading 
Hardware  Company  for  a  time,  afterwards  working  at  various  places  and 
learning  the  trade  of  carpenter,  which  he  commenced  July  i8,  1904.  He  came 
to  Schuylkill  Haven  July  20,  1907,  and  worked  at  his  trade  until  October,  when 
he  began  in  partnership  with  his  brother  William  to  build  the  roller  skating 
rink,  completing  it  April  28,  1908.  The  rink  is  two  stories  in  height  and  67  by 
140  feet  in  size,  having  one  of  the  largest  floors  in  this  part  of  the  State.  Mr. 
Naffin  also  conducted  a  rink  at  Minersville,  Pa.,  for  two  seasons  with  success, 
and  ran  a  portable  rink  for  two  seasons.  The  firm  was  known  as  Paul  R.  Naffin 
&  Bro.  until  March,  1913,  when  Gustave,  the  other  partner,  withdrew,  leaving 
Paul  R.  Naffin  as  the  sole  owner.  Mr.  Naffin  also  does  considerable  contracting 
and  building  in  Schuylkill  Haven  and  vicinity.  He  resides  at  Schuylkill  Haven, 
where  he  attends  Christ  Lutheran  Church.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Carpenters' 
Union  of  Pottsville. 

On  Oct.  I,  1914,  Mr.  Naffin  was  married  to  Helen  Louisa  MuUdore, 
who  was  born  in  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  June  23,  1891.  They  have  one  child, 
Richard  Spindler,  bom  July  27,  191 5. 

SOLOMON  A.  BARKET,  of  Pottsville,  has  exepiplified  in  his  prosperous 
business  career  that  the  era  of  opportunities  for  willing  workers  is  not  over. 
Coming  to  this  county  in  1893,  he  has  without  the  aid  of  friends  or  advan- 
tages, made  his  way  to  a  substantial  position  in  local  business  circles,  conduct- 
ing a  useful  industry,  which  has  been  valuable  to  the  town  as  well  as  profitable 
to  him. 

Mr.  Barket  was  born  in  Tripoli,  Syria,  in  1876,  and  came  to  America  when 
seventeen  years  old,  landing  at  New  York  City  in  1893.  Proceeding  thence 
to  Pottsville,  Pa.,  he  began  to  work  as  a  peddler  in  Schuylkill  county,  being 
so  engaged  for  two  years  and  ten  months.  By  that  time  he  felt  that  he  could 
take  the  responsibility  of  a  store,  and  he  engaged  in  the  wholesale  dry  goods 
and  notion  business  at  No.  401  West  Minersville  street,  where  he  has  since 
been  located.  He  continued  his  original  line  for  twelve  years,  and  in  1910 
commenced  the  manufacture  of  hosiery,  which  he  started  June  27th.  He 
has  an  up-to-date  knitting  mill  and  is  engaged  in  the  production  of  men's  half- 
hose,  the  eighty-four-needle  hose,  known  as  the  miner's  sock,  and  the  one 
himdred  and  seventy-six-needle  hose,  a  fine  grade.  Beginning  with  five 
machines  Mr.  Barket  has  so  increased  his  trade  that  he  now  has  over  sixty 
and  employs  from  fifteen  to  twenty  people  steadily,  the  growing  demand  for 
his  goods  being  a  sure  evidence  of  the  satisfaction  they  have  given  to  con- 
stuners.  The  product  is  disposed  of  mostly  through  jobbers.  Mr.  Barket  has 
acquired  the  ownership  of  the  property  where  his  factory  is  located,  and  also 
of  No.  405  West  Minersville  street. 

On  June  19,  1909,  Mr.  Barket  married  Matilda  Ashwood,  like  himself  a 
native  of  Syria,  daughter  of  Faress  Ashwood,  the  ceremony  being  performed 
at  Pottsville  by  Fathers  McGovem,  Malley  and  Fiatt.  Mrs.  Barket  was 
taken  to  Brazil  when  nine  years  old,  and  came  to  America  two  years  later. 
Three  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Barket:     EHas,  April  18, 


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720  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

191 1 ;  Gertrude,  June  27,  1913,  and  Alfred  Peter,  April  29,  1915.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Barket  are  members  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Church. 

.  BRITTON  W.  SATERLEE  (deceased)  was  stationed  at  Cressona,  Schuyl- 
kill county,  from  1903  until  his  recent  death,  acting  as  assistant  trainmaster 
for  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company  at  that  point,  to  which  he 
was  transferred  from  Allentown.  He  was  in  the  service  of  the  company  from 
1890,  and  his  various  promotions  during  the  quarter  of  a  century  he  remained 
in  its  employ  attested  the  value  placed  upon  his  ability  and  trustworthiness. 

Mr.  Saterlee's  grandparents,  Edward  N.  and  Lucy  (Falkner)  Saterlee, 
were  natives  of  northeast  New  York  and  northern  Pennsylvania,  respectively. 
His  father,  Britton  W.  Saterlee,  Sr.,  was  a  soldier  in  thie  Civil  war,  enlisting 
in  March,  1864,  in  Company  L,  7th  Pennsylvania  Cavalry.  The  following 
month  he  died  of  typhoid  fever.  He  married  Lucy  Fenderson,  daughter  of 
John  and  Lucy  (Clemens)  Fenderson,  the  former  born  in  Bangor,  Maine, 
and  the  latter  in  Massachusetts ;  Mrs.  Fenderson  was  a  first  cousin  of  Edward 
Everett,  the  historian.  After  Mr.  Saterlee's  death  his  widow  became  the 
wife  of  John  C.  East,  who  was  a  member  of  the  146th  Virginia  Confederate 
Infantry  in  the  Civil  war,  but  who  took  the  oath  of  allegiance  prior  to  the 
cessation  of  hostilities.  By  this  union  she  had  three  sons  and  three  daughters : 
Martha  M.,  Mildred  E.  (deceased),  John  L.,  William  T.,  Carrie  S.  and 
James  E. 

Britton  W.  Saterlee  was  bom  Sept.  4,  1864,  at  Karthaus,  Clearfield  Co., 
Pa.  He  attended  public  school  in  New  York  State  from  1869  to  1875,  and 
was  at  the  soldiers'  orphans'  school  at  White  Hill,  Cumberland  Co.,  Pa.,  from 
1875  to  1880.  His  first  employment  was  as  a  mechanic  with  the  Lycoming 
Rubber  Company,  of  Williamsport,  where  he  remained  for  eight  years.  For 
one  year  he  was  with  the  Perkins  &  Miller  Lumber  Company,  of  Westlake, 
La.,  and  in  1890  entered  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Company 
as  clerk  at  Williamsport.  In  1893  he  was  made  freight  agent  at  Shippens- 
burg,  Pa.,  and  six  years  later  was  promoted  to  the  position  of  assistant  train- 
master, at  Palo  Alto.  The  next  year  he  went  to  Allentown,  in  the  same 
capacity,  and  in  1903  was  assigned  to  Cressona,  where  he  was  first  assistant 
trainmaster.    He  died  suddenly  at  his  home  in  Cressona,  March  5,  1915. 

Mr.  Saterlee  proved  a  desirable  citizen  of  the  community,  where  he  gained 
respect  and  esteem  by  his  strict  attention  to  duty  and  integrity  in  all  his  rela- 
tions with  his  fellow  townsmen.  He  was  a  Mason,  belonging  to  Cressona 
Lodge,  No.  426,  F.  &  A.  M.,  and  a  member  of  the  Royal  Arcanum  (Potts- 
ville  Council,  No.  965).  Politically  he  did  not  pledge  himself  to  the  support 
of  any  particular  party,  voting  as  his  conscience  dictated.  ' 

On  Sept.  10,  1882,  Mr.  Saterlee  was  married  to  Eda  L.  Managan,  daughter 
of  Thomas  and  Harriet  (Bixby)  Managan,  of  Tioga,  Pa.  Of  the  nine  chil- 
dren born  to  this  marriage  four  are  deceased;  Arietta,  the  eldest,  is  married 
to  William  H.  Hansford,  of  Philadelphia,  formerly  of  Richmond,  Va. ;  Har- 
riet B.  is  the  wife  of  Rev.  R.  E.  Vellines,  of  Minersville;  Ida  M.  is  at  home; 
Gerald  B.  lives  at  Reading;  Eda  Hilma  has  received  her  higher  education  at 
the  Wilson  College  for  Women.  The  Saterlees  ire  members  of  the  First 
Methodist  Episcopal  Church  of  Cressona,  to  which  Mr.  Saterlee  also  belonged. 

CARL  FREDERICK  HOLDERMAN,  late  of  Shenandoah,  held  an 
estimable  place  among  his  associates  in  every  relation  of  life.  His  worth 
might  be  measured  by  the  respect  they  showed  in  recognition  of  his  substan- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  721 

tial  qualities,  and  no  less  by  the  friends  he  made  through  his  admirable  personal 
traits,  which  endeared  him  to  many  in  social  ties. 

Mr.  Holderman  was  a  native  of  Baden,  Germany,  bom  Sept.  7,  1854,  at 
Mosbach,  son  of  Karl  Frederick  and  Marie  Holderman  and  grandson  of 
George  and  Anna  Holderman.  George  Holderman  owned  a  large  bakery  at 
Mosbach,  following  that  business  all  his  life.  He  and  his  wife  are  buried  at 
that  place.  Their  children  were :  Henry,  George,  Karl  Frederick,  Anna,  and 
Marie.  The  parents  were  members  of  the  German  Evangelical  Lutheran 
Church,  and  active  in  its  work. 

Karl  Frederick  Holderman,  son  of  George,  was  born  at  Mosbach,  and 
died  when  about  thirty-six  years  old.  He  was  well  educated,  p^aduatingf  with 
honors  from  the  Gymnasium  at  Karlsruhe,  Baden,  where  his  picture  was  htmg 
in  tribute  to  his  scholarship.  He  became  a  civil  engineer.  His  wife,  whose 
maiden  name  was  Marie  Mueller,  lived  in  Mosbach  until  ten  years  before 
her  death,  then  removing  to  Karlsruhe,  where  she  passed  away  at  the  age 
of  sixty-three  years.  She  is  buried  at  Karlsruhe,  Mr.  Holderman  at  Mosbach. 
They  were  members  of  the  German  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  at  Mosbach. 
The  following  children  were  bom  to  them:  Carl  Frederick;  Marie,  Mrs. 
Wieland,  whose  husband  was  overseer  for  the  Duke  of  Baden;  Helena,  who 
was  married  to  the  late  Albert  Mueller,  Chancellor  to  the  Duchess  of  Baden ; 
and  Frederick  L.,  who  was  Private  Secretary  to  Baron  von  Rothschild. 

Carl  Frederick  Holderman  was  reared  at  Mosbach,  receiving  his  educa- 
tion there  ancf  at  Karlsmhe,  where  he  leamed  his  trade  of  watchmaker.  He 
followed  it  in  his  home  town  for  some  time,  and  later  in  Vienna,  Austria, 
where  he  remained  until  after  his  marriage,  which  took  place  in  1876.  In 
November  of  that  year  he  came  with  his  wife  to  this  country,  where  he  first 
found  employment  in  the  Hitchcock  jewelry  establishment  on  Broadway,  New 
York  City.  Later  he  worked  for  Bailey,  Banks  &  Biddle,  in  Philadelphia, 
and,  in  the  year  1879  he  arrived  at  Shenandoah,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where 
he  made  a  permanent  home.  He  began  work  at  his  trade  with  T.  Cassidy, 
at  No.  40  North  Main  street,  remaining  with  him  until  he  bought  the  estab- 
lishment, in  1880,  to  continue  it  on  his  own  account.  Subsequently  he  removed 
the  jewelry  business  to  No.  131  North  Main  street,  and  a  few  years  later 
purchased  the  site  at  No.  112  North  Main  street,  where  it  has  since  been 
conducted.  His  home  was  also  at  that  location.  Mr.  Holderman,  though 
interested  in  the  business  until  his  death,  had  been  in  poor  health  for  six 
months  previously,  and  in  the  latter  part  of  1914  underwent  an  operation  at 
the  State  Hospital  at  Fountain  Springs,  Pa.  Though  his  condition  seemed 
hopeful  at  times  he  never  really  rallied,  and  he  passed  ft  way  at  his  home  on 
Jan.  II,  1915.  Mr.  Holderman  traveled  and  read  extensively  and  was  a 
most  interesting  conversationalist,  his  active  mind  and  keen  powers  of  obser- 
vation betokening  unusual  intelligence.  In  disposition  he  was  genial  and 
kindly,  and  his  friendly  attitude  attracted  many  to  him  who  will  cherish  his 
memory  among  their  delightful  experiences.  Mr.  Hofderman  is  buried  in  the 
Odd  Fellows'  cemetery  at  Shenandoah.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Evangelical 
Lutheran  Church,  and  in  politics  was  identified  with  the  Republican  party. 

On  April  12,  1876,  Mr.  Holderman  was  married  in  Vienna,  Austria,  by  a 
Lutheran  clergyman,  to  Anna  Louise  Holderman,  who  was  bom  in  that  city 
June  I,  1857,  and  received  her  education  there.  Children  as  follows  were 
bom  to  this  marriage:  Charles  Frederick,  bom  March  15,  1877,  in  Phila- 
delphia, now  engaged  as  traveling  auditor  for  the  S.  &  S.  Packing  Co.,  of 
Chicago,  III;  Frederica  Louise,  bom  Nov.   1^7,  1878,  in  Philadelphia,  who 

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722  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANL\ 

died  when  seventeen  days  old;  Frederick  William,  bom  Oct.  17,  1879,  in 
Philadelphia,  now  a  resident  of  Hazleton,  Pa.,  engaged  as  a  mining  engineer 
for  the  Lehigh  Valley  Coal  Company ;  Emil  Otto,  bom  Sept.  25,  1883,  a  min- 
ing engineer  in  the  employ  of  the  Lehigh  Valley  Coal  Company  at  Centralia, 
living  at  home ;  Bertha  Anna  Marie,  bom  Feb.  9,  1882,  who  graduated  from 
the  State  Normal  School  at  Bloomsburg,  Pa.,  from  the  Hazleton  (Pa.)  Busi- 
ness College,  and  from  the  Rochester  (N.  Y.)  Business  Institute,  and  now  the 
commercial  teacher  in  the  Shenandoah  High  School;  Henry  Otto,  bom  Jan. 
5,  1886,  who  died  when  four  months  old;  and  Hei-bert  Helmuth,  bom  April 
I,  1893,  a  student  in  the  Jefferson  Medical  College,  Philadelphia,  class  of 
1916.  All  of  this  family  hold  membership  in  the  Reformed  Church. 

There  are  four  grandchildren,  all  children  of  Charles  F.  and  Jennie  Holder- 
man,  as  follows:  Anna  Louise,  bom  at  Pottsville,  Pa.,  June  28,  1901 ;  Marie 
Bertha,  bom  April  3,  1903,  at  Shenandoah,  Pa.;  Karl  Frederick,  bom  at 
Chicago,  111.,  Oct.  8,  1905 ;  Frances  Marguerite,  bom  at  Chicago,  111.,  Jan.  28, 
1914. 

Mrs.  Holderman  now  lives  at  116  North  Jardin  street,  Shenandoah,  Penn- 
sylvania. 

ALFRED  HEHN,  a  merchant  and  assessor  of  Pine  Groye  township,  was 
bom  in  Wayne  township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  Oct.  13,  1849,  son  of  William 
and  Esther  (Scheaffer)  Hehn,  and  grandson  of  Jacob  Hehn.  The  American 
founder  of  the  Hehn  family  (also  spelled  Hain  in  the  early  days),  was  a 
native  of  France,  and  leaving  that  land  reached  the  New  World  after  a  long 
and  stormy  voyage.  He  located  near  Hain's  Church,  in  Berks  county,  Pa., 
where  he  spent  the  remainder  of  his  life. 

Jacob  Hehn  was  bom  in  Berks  county.  Pa.,  and  in  young  manhood  moved 
to  Schuylkill  county,  locating  in  Wayne  township  on  a  farm  known  as  the 
Farrabee  property.  There  he  carried  on  farming  for  many  years,  becoming 
one  of  the  well  known  men  of  his  community.  When  Schuylkill  county  was 
taken  from  Berks  county,  Jacob  Hehn  was  made  one  of  the  first  county  com- 
missioners, and  he  always  took  a  deep  interest  in  its  growth. 

William  Hehn,  a  son  of  Jacob  Hehn,  was  born  in  Wayne  township,  and 
like  his  father  was  a  farmer.  His  farm  was  located  in  Washington  township, 
where  he  died  at  the  age  of  fifty-eight  years.  He  and  his  wife  had  these 
children:  Mary  M.,  Angeline,  Alfred,  Matilda,  Susan,  Lucinda,  John,  Peter 
and  Sallie. 

After  completing  his  studies  in  the  schools  of  his  district,  Alfred  Hehn 
became  a  farmer,  but  within  a  few  years  began  working  in  the  Lincoln  col- 
liery, where  he  continued  for  twenty-two  years.  He  then  saw  an  opening  for 
a  general  store  at  Pleasant  Valley,  in  Pine  Grgve  township,  and  embarked 
in  this  line,  in  which  he  has  since  continued  very  profitably.  Not  only  is  Mr. 
Hehn  serving  in  his  second  term  as  assessor  of  his  township,  but  he  was  a 
constable  of  the  township  for  four  years,  and  is  one  of  the  well  known  men 
of  his  part  of  the  county. 

By  his  first  wife,  Annie,  Mr.  Hehn  had  one  daughter,  Annie.  He  married 
(second)  Elizabeth  Satticaln,  daughter  of  Peter  Satticaln,  and  they  became  the 
parents  of  four  children :  Matilda,  Sallie,  William  A.,  and  Paul  S.  Mr.  Hehn 
belongs  to  the  Reformed  Church,  in  which  he  is  held  in  high  esteem.  Frater- 
nally he  is  affiliated  with  the  Order  of  Odd  Fellows,  and  enjoys  his  connection 
in  this  direction.  An  eamest,  steadfast,  hardworking  man,  he  has  eamed  all 
his  possessions,  and  can  well  be  proud  of  what  he  has  accomplished. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  723 

EDWIN  R.  NEISWENDER,  of  New  Ringgold,  has  become  well  known 
to  the  residents  of  the  borough  and  vicinity  in  his  long  service  at  that  point 
in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company.  He  has 
been  located  there  since  1900,  as  station  agent  since  March  i,  1913.  Mr. 
Neiswender  is  a  native  of  Ohio,  but  the  family  is  of  old  Schuylkill  coimty 
stock. 

George  Neiswender,  his  grandfather,  was  bom  about  the  year  1794,  near 
Orwigsburg,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  He  was  a  farmer  all  his  life,  and  the 
owner  of  a  large  tract  in  West  Brunswick  township.  His  wife,  Mary 
(Keim),  bom  in  1800,  died  in  1878,  was  a  daughter  of  Peter  Keim.  To  Mr. 
and  Mrs .  Neiswender  were  born  children  as  follows :  George  married 
Hannah  Riegel ;  Daniel  married  Eliza  Tyson ;  Samuel  is  the  father  of  Edwin 
R.  Neiswender ;  Polly  married  John  Bensinger ;  Lydia  married  John  Weaver ; 
Sallie  married  Nathan  Zimmerman;  Hannah  married  Henry  Geiger;  Levina 
married  Samuel  Hillibish.  The  father  was  a  Republican  on  political  ques- 
tions. His  religious  connection  was  with  the  Lutheran  Church  at  Orwigs- 
burg. 

Samuel  Neiswender  was  bom  at  Tumbling  Run,  near  Pottsville,  April 
28,  1834,  was  educated  at  Orwigsburg,  and  assisted  his  father  on  the  home 
farm.  After  his  father's  death  he  bought  the  home  place,  a  tract  of  100 
acres,  and  later  came  to  own  another  farm,  of  fifty  acres.  After  farming 
successfully  in  that  section  for  a  number  of  years,  he  lost  all  he  had  accumu- 
lated through  a  bank  failure.  Moving  to  Bowling  Green,  Ohio,  he  tenanted 
a  number  of  farms  there,  returning  to  Schuylkill  county  in  1886.  There- 
after he  tenanted  farms  for  several  years,  and  also  did  work  on  the  neigh- 
boring farms,  but  for  the  last  ten  years  he  has  been  living  retired  in  his  home 
at  New  Ringgold.  Mr.  Neiswender  dealt  in  horses  for  some  time  and  was 
an  excellent  judge,  having  been  a  jockey  in  his  early  days.  On  Oct. '27,  1862, 
he  enlisted  from  Schuylkill  county,  and  was  mustered  in  at  Reading,  Pa.,  in 
Company  I,  167th  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Infantry,  to  serve  nine  months. 
He  was  under  Capts.  J.  M.  ShoUenberger  and  Charles  Knoder,  and  Col.  J.  D. 
Davis.  The  regiment  was  assigned  to  the  ist  Brigade,  ist  Division,  and 
attached  to  the  ist  and  6th  Army  Corps  of  the  Army  of  the  Potomac.  The 
command  went  to  Harrisburg  and  then  to  Baltimore,  later  to  Washington, 
D.  C,  and  to  Suffolk,  and  was  engaged  in  guard  duty  at  the  fortifications 
there.  In  the  expedition  to  the  Black  Water  his  regiment  engaged  the  enemy 
at  Deserted  Farm,  Jan.  30,  1863;  was  in  the  siege  of  Suffolk,  April  12  to 
May  4,  1863;  and  joined  in  the  pursuit  of  Lee  on  his  retreat  from  Gettys- 
burg. Mr.  Neiswender  shared  in  all  its  movements  and  fortunes,  and  was 
honorably  discharged  at  Reading,  Pa.,  Aug.  12,  1863.  He  reenlisted  Febi.  23, 
1864,  for  three  years  or  during  the  war,  in  Company  I,  48th  Pennsylvania 
Volunteer  Infantry,  serving  under  Capts.  B.  B.  Schuck  and  N.  B.  Koch, 
and  Cols.  G.  W.  Gowen  and  I.  N.  Brannon.  Under  this  enlistment  he  was 
in  the  engagements  of  the  Wildemess,  May  5,  1864;  Spottsylvania,  May 
8-18,  1864;  North  Anna  River,  May  23-27,  1864;  Cold  Harbor,  June  1-12, 
1864;  Petersburg,  June  15-30,  1864;  Mine  Explosion,  July  30,  1864;  Poplar 
Spring  Church,  Sept.  30,  1864;  Fort  Sedgwick,  Nov.  5,  1864;  fall  of  Peters- 
bui^;  and  was  discharged  at  Petersburg  July  17,  1865. 

Mr.  Neiswender  was  first  married  to  Priscilla  Halderman,  who  was  bom 
in  West  Penn  township,  this  county,  April  23,  183-,  a  daughter  of  Abra- 
ham Halderman.     She  died  aged  thirty-three  years,  the  mother  of  the  fol- 


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724  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

lowing  children:  Moses,  bom  Sept.  24,  1856,  who  married  Kate  Dreher; 
Jonas,  bom  July  17,  i8|9;  Mary,  bom  Aug.  24,  1861,  wife  of.  Jacob  Frantz; 
Rena,  bom  July  i,  1866,  who  married  a  Mr.  Henderson  and  is  deceased; 
Rosie,  bom  May  11,  1868,  widow  of  Nicholas  Yocum;  Eli,  bom  in  1869;  and 
Ida,  bom  Aug.  18,  1870.  For  his  second  wife  Mr.  Neiswender  married 
Katie  Ehzabeth  Smith,  who  was  born  April  15,  1858,  in  the  State  of  New 
Hampshire,  a  daughter  of  John  and  Elizabeth  (Smith)  Smith.  Children 
as  follows  were  born  to  this  marriage:  Edwin  R.;  William  H.,  born  Nov.  3, 
1878,  who  died  Sept.  18,  1904;  Minnie  F.,  bom  Feb.  22,  1880,  wife  of  Wil- 
liam M.  Koch;  Lewis  R.,  bom  Aug.  15,  1883,  who  married  Gertmde  Sel- 
grath ;  and  Agnes  M.,  bom  Aug.  6,  1894,  wife  of  Charles  Hepler.  Mr.  Neis- 
wender is  a  member  of  the  Frieden's  Lutheran  Church  at  New  Ringgold. 
He  is  a  Republican  in  politics.  '  • 

Edwin  R.  Neiswender  was  bom  March  20,  1875,  at  Bowling  Green,  Ohio, 
was  educated  in  the  public  schools  there  and  at  Jacksonville,  Lehigh  Co.,  Pa., 
and  Hecla,  in  East  Bmnswick  township,  Schuylkill  county.  He  spent  six 
years  at  farm  work,  assisting  on  the  farms  of  Daniel  Schroeder,  at  Lynnport, 
Lehigh  Co.,  Pa.;  John  Fetherolf,  Jacksonville,  Lehigh  Co.,  Pa.;  James 
Braucher,  near  Wessnersville,  Lehigh  Co.,  Pa. ;  Jacob  Frantz,  of  New  Ring- 
gold, Schuylkill  county;  Geor^re  Stamm,  of  East  Bmnswick  township;  and 
Alvin  Frantz,  of  East  Bmnswick  township.  On  Nov.  5,  1894,  he  entered  the 
station  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company  at  New  Ringgold  to 
leam  telegraphy  with  George  W.  Vetter.  At  the  end  of  eleven  months  he 
was  appointed  extra  operator  and  again  agent  for  the  company  and  served 
two  years  between  Port  Qinton  and  Mahanoy  City,  also  on  the  Catawissa 
division  as  far  north  as  Lofty,  Schuylkill  county.  On  Nov.  14,  1897,  he  went 
on  duty  as  regular  night  operator  in  the  Q.  X.  office  at  the  Tamaqua  yard, 
remaining  there  until  April  i,  1899.  On  that  date  he  changed  to  Tunnel  Scale, 
where  he  was  stationed  until  April  6,  1900,  when  he  went  on  duty  as  regular 
night  operator  at  Z.  office,  Tamaqua.  He  was  there  until  transferred,  June 
I,  1900,  as  regular  night  man  at  New  Ringgold,  holding  that  position  until 
April  I,  1905,  when  he  was  appointed  regular  day  operator  at  New  Ringgold. 
He  was  retained  in  that  capacity  until  March  i,  1913,  when  he  was  appointed 
station  agent  at  New  Ringgold,  succeeding  David  Vetter,  retired.  He  also  acts 
as  agent  for  the  American  Express  Company. 

Mr.  Neiswender  has  identified  himself  with  the  best  interests  of  New 
Ringgold,  and  in  recognition  of  his  activity  has  been  honored  with  various 
offices.  He  has  been  councilman  of  New  Ringgold  for  six  years,  and  State 
health  officer  for  the  townships  of  West  Penn  and  East  Bmnswick  for  three 
years.  He  has  been  a  zealous  Republican,  has  acted  as  judge,  inspector 
and  clerk  of  elections,  and  he  has  been  a  delegate  to  county  conven- 
tions a  number  of  times.  He  is  a  prominent  member  of  Washing- 
ton Camp,  No.  100,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  at  New  Ringgold,  is  a  past  pres- 
ident and  at  present  tmstee;  and  has  been  delegate  from  his  camp  to  the 
State  convention.  Mr.  Neiswender  also  belongs  to  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading 
Relief  Association.  A  Lutheran  in  religious  faith,  he  is  one  of  the  most 
valued  members  of  the  Frieden's  Church  at  New  Ringgold,  and  has  been 
honored  with  its  most  important  offices.  Formerly  he  was  a  deacon,  and  he 
is  now  serving  his  sixth  year  as  elder,  and  is  also  church  treasurer.  He  was 
secretary  of  the  church  council  for  a  number  of  years,  and  superintendent  of 
the  Sunday  school  for  a  long  period.     His  varied  experience  in  church  work 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  725 

has  qualified  him  for  effective  service  and  he  is  conscientious  in  the  perform- 
ance of  all  his  duties. 

Mr.  Neiswender  married  Catherine  Magdalena  Vetter,  bom  Jan.  22,  1880, 
a  daughter  of  David  and  Mary  C.  (Hetzel)  Vetter,  and  they  have  had  two 
children:  (i)  Florence  May,  bom  Dec.  20,  1895,  began  her  education  in  the 
schools  of  New  Ringgold  and  is  a  graduate  of  the  Keystone  State  Normal 
School,  class  of  1913.  She  is  now  teaching  the  primary  grade  in  the  New  Ring- 
gold schools.     (2)  Luther  Edwin,  bora  Dec.  9,  1900,  died  March  28,  1902. 

Mrs.  Neiswender  obtained  her  literary  education  in  the  schools  of  New 
Ringgold,  and  spent  seven  years  as  a  private  pupil  of  Gilbert  R.  Coombs, 
principal  of  the  South  Broad  Street  Conservatory  of  Music,  Philadelphia, 
graduating  from  the  conservatory  in  piano,  theory,  harmony,  history  and 
ensemble,  analysis,  sight  reading,  and  the  normal  training  course.  Subse- 
quently she  started  a  class  of  piano  students  in  Tamaqua,  Pa.,  which  she 
continued  for  four  months,  imtil  because  of  illness  she  was  obliged  to  discon- 
tinue it,  having  contracted  blood  poisoning.  After  a  lapse  of  one  year  she 
resumed  teaching,  at  New  Ringgold.  She  is  now  organist  and  chorister  of 
Frieden's  Lutheran  and  Reformed  Church. 

Mrs.  Neiswender  is  of  German  lineage  on  both  sides,  being  a  daughter  of 
David  and  Mary  C.  (Hetzel)  Vetter,  granddaughter  of  John  and  Mary 
(Hetzel)  Vetter  and  great-granddaughter  of  John  Vetter.  Her  father  was 
station  agent  at  New  Ringgold  for  over  twenty  years,  and  is  now  living  retired 
in  that  borough.  An  account  of  the  Vetter  and  Hetzel  families  appears  in  his 
biography  in  this  work. 

JOHN  O.  J.  BOYER,  a  popular  engineer  in  the  employ  of  the  Phila- 
delphia &  Reading  Railway  Company,  located  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  was  bora 
Jan.  7,  1877,  in  that  borough,  son  of  Edward  Boyer  and  grandson  of  Philip 
Isaac  Boyer,  all  natives  of  Schuylkill  county,  Penns}H[vania. 

Philip  Isaac  Boyer,  the  grandfather,  was  bora  May  2,  1805,  in  Manhetm 
township,  this  county,  and  was  a  farmer  by  occupation,  residing  in  South  Man- 
heim  township  for  a  number  of  years.  He  then  removed  to  Schuylkill  Haven, 
where  he  died  May  16,  1863,  and  is  interred  in  the  Union  cemetery  there.  He 
was  twice  married,  his  first  wife,  Maria,  bora  in  South  Manheim 
township  Jan.  22,  181 1,  dying  in  Schuylkill  Haven  Nov.  15,  1829;  she  is  buried 
in  the  Union  cemetery  at  Schuylkill  Haven.  Edward  Boyer  was  bora  to  this 
union.  For  his  second  wife  Philip  Isaac  Boyer  married  Catharine  Heffner, 
and  she  was  tht  mother  of  a  daughter,  Maria,  who  married  Daniel  Moyer. 

Edward  Boyer  was  bora  May  16,  1828,  in  South  Manheim  township, 
Schuylkill  county,  and  followed  farming  during  the  earlier  years  of  his  work- 
ing life.  He  spent  some  years  in  railroading,  but  most  of  his  work  was 
agricultural  in  character.  His  death  occurred  on  the  street  in  Pottsville, 
while  he  was  waiting  for  a  car  to  go  on  a  visit,  and  before  he  could  be  con- 
veyed to  the  hospital  for  treatment  he  passed  away.  His  remains  He  in  the 
Union  cemetery  at  Schuylkill  Haven.  Mr.  Boyer  was  married  to  Sarah  Ann 
DeLong,  a  daughter  of  Isaac  DeLong,  of  Cressona,  blacksmith  and  wheel- 
wright. '  Nine  children  were  bora  to  this  union :  Celia,  Philip,  Catherine,  Ed- 
ward, Calvin,  Mary,  Luther,  Mabel  and  John  O.  J. 

John  O.  J.  Boyer  attended  the  public  schools  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  as 
soon  as  he  was  permitted  to  go  to  work  selected  the  occupation  of  railroading. 
At  the  age  of  eighteen  years  he  began  to  fire  an  engine,  and  in  1904  was  given 


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726  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

charge  of  his  first  engine,  on  the  run  between  Pottsville  and  Philadelphia.  All 
of  his  railroad  experience  has  been  with  the  same  company,  and  he  has  gained 
the  respect  of  his  employers  and  the  friendship  of  his  fellow  employes  and  the 
traveling  public.  After  running  a  passenger  train  on  the  Reading  division 
of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  road  successfully  he  was  promoted  to  the  posi- 
tion of  road  foreman  of  engines  on  the  Reading  division,  and  is  so  engaged  at 
the  present  time.  Mr.  Boyer  resides  on  Dock  street,  in  Schuylkill  Haven,  and 
is  one  of  the  respected  citizens  of  the  borough. 

Mr.  Boyer  was  united  in  marriage  to  Lillie  I.  Brownmiller,  a  daughter  of 
Thomas  Daniel  Brownmiller,  of  Lebanon  county.  Pa.,  a  sketch  of  whose 
family  follows.  Mrs.  Boyer  was  bom  in  Lebanon  county,  June  7,  1877.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Boyer  have  two  children,  Paul  and  Edward.  Mr.  Boyer  is  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Reformed  Church,  while  his  wife  is  an  attendant  of  the  Lutheran 
Church.  Socially  Mr.  Boyer  is  a  member  of  Page  Lodge,  No.  270,  F.  & 
A.  M. ;  a  charter  member  of  Reading  Lodge  of  Perfection  (fourteenth  d^^e)  ; 
belongs  to  Philadelphia  Consistory  (thirty-second  degree),  and  to  Rajah 
Temple,  A.  A.  O.  N.  M.  S.  He  is  also  a  member  of  the  Jr.  O.  U.  A.  M.  and 
the  P.  O.  S.  of  A. 

The  Brownmiller  family,  of  which  Mrs.  J.  O.  J.  Boyer  is  a  member,  was 
founded  in  America  by  Johannes  Braunmiller  who  was  bom  about  17 12  in 
Gexmany,  and  emigrated  to  this  country  on  the  ship  "Samuel,"  from  Rotter- 
dam, landing  in  Philadelphia  Aug.  27,  1739.  He  is  supposed  to  have  settled 
in  New  Jersey,  where  he  raised  a  large  family. 

Luttwick  Braunmiller  (Ludwig  Brownmiller),  son  of  the  emigrant 
Johannes,  located  in  Northampton  county.  Pa.,  before  the  Revolution,  and 
from  that  place  many  of  his  family  moved  to  Lenhartsville,  Berks  county.  Pa. 
Luttwick  Braunmiller  served  in  the  Revolutionary  war,  in  Capt.  Frederick 
Kern's  company,  and  since  that  time  the  family  has  been  represented  in  every 
war  in  which  this  country  has  been  involved. 

Nicholas  Brownmiller,  M.  D.,  son  of  Luttwick,  lived  near  Lenhartsville, 
Berks  county,  and  owned  what  is  now  called  the  Yenser  farm.  On  this,  farm 
is  a  private  burial  ground  where  many  of  the  family  are  interred.  His  chil- 
dren were :  Moses  and  Josiah,  of  Hamburg,  and  Nicholas,  of  Pottsville.  Penn- 
sylvania. 

Frederick  Brownmiller,  son  of  Luttwick,  lived  in  earlier  hfe  near  Bath, 
Northampton  county,  and  from  there  moved  to  Hokendauqua,  Lehigh  county, 
and  then  to  Lenhartsville.  He  was  married  to  Barbara  Nolf,  and  their  chil- 
dren were:  George,  Joseph,  Daniel,  Reuben,  Samuel  (died  in  the  Civil  war), 
Jeremiah  and  Benneville  (a  Methodist  minister).  All  of  the  earlier  members 
of  the  family  were  Lutherans. 

Joseph  Brownmiller,  son  of  Frederick,  was  born  Oct.  23,  1807,  at  Hoken- 
dauqua, Lehigh  county,  and  was  a  shoemaker.  He  was  organist  and  chorister 
of  Klopp's  Church,  in  Lebanon  county.  Pa.,  for  more  than  forty  years.  He 
died  April  7,  1895.  He  married  Hannah  Stein,  of  Greenwich,  Berks  county, 
who  died  May  i,  1877,  aged  sixty-four  years,  six  months,  twenty-six  days, 
and  they  had  ten  children:  Helena;  Maria,  wife  of  Gideoit  Botz;  Esther,  wife 
of  Eli  Wolever;  Amelia,  wife  of  Samuel  F.  Steiner;  Joel;  Susanna,  marned 
to  Jonathan  Miller;  Amanda,  married  to  Isaac  K.  Wolf ;  Emma,  wife  of  John 
H   Kreiser;  Ephraim  S.;  and  Thomas  Daniel,  father  of  Mrs.  Boyer 

'  Thomas  Daniel  Brownmiller  was  bom  May  14.  1856,  at  Hamlin,  Lebanon 
Co ,  Pa.,  and  his  death  occurred  Aug.  14,  191S.    He  was  a  graduate  of  Palat- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  727 

inate  Collie,  Myerstown,  Lebanon  county,  was  a  professor  of  music,  and  for 
forty-six  years  was  organist  and  chorister  in  the  Lutheran  Church.  He  mar- 
ried Fianna  Gerhart,  of  Hamlin,  and  their  union  was  blessed  with  6ve  chil- 
dren :  Lillie,  wife  of  John  O.  J.  Boyer ;  J.  Harry,  of  New  York  City,  at  present 
a  salesman  in  the  Wanamaker  store ;  Charles,  of  Cape  May  City,  Cape  May, 
N.  J. ;  Roy  and  Annetta,  living  at  home  in  Schuylkill  Haven. 

JOHN  M.  OREN,  of  Port  Carbon,  has  been  deputy  recorder  of  Schuyl- 
kill county  for  several  years,  and  his  intelligent  performance  of  the  duties 
of  that  position  has  given  much  satisfaction  to  his  fellow  citizens.  The  pains- 
taking attention  he  has  given  to  his  work  and  obliging  courtesy  to  all  who  have 
had  occasion  to  seek  his  services  have  made  him  deservedly  popular  at  the 
county  seat,  and  his  long  service  has  given  him  a  familiarity  with  the  records 
which  is  of  the  highest  value  in  the  correct  transaction  of  the  business  of  the 
office.  Mr.  Oren  was  bom  at  Palo  Alto,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  Feb.  5,  1856^  son 
of  James  Oren.  His  grandfather,  James  Oren,  was  a  native  of  Ireland,  and 
on  coming  to  America  settled  at  New  Cumberland,  in  Cumberland  county. 
Pa,,  where  he  followed  farming. 

James  Oren,  father  of  John  M.  Oren,  was  bom  in  New  Cumberland.  He 
was  only  a  boy  when  he  came  to  Palo  Alto,  where  he  was  in  the  employ  of  the 
Navigation  Company  for  many  years,  being  with  them  when  the  canal  was 
first  opened  until  it  was  discontinued  in  1871.  He  rose  to  the  position  of 
harbormaster.  After  the  canal  was  abandoned  he  was  engaged  as  a  railroad 
foreman  for  several  years,  and  he  died  at  Palo  Alto  at  the  age  of  sixty-seven 
years.  By  his  first  marriage,  to  Rosa  Krause,  of  Lebanon,  Pa.,  Mr.  Oren  had 
four  children,  Jennie,  Elizabeth,  John  M.  and  Cora.  By  his  second  wife, 
Luthena  (Chillson),  daughter  of  Squire  Walter  S.  Chillson,  of  Palo  Alto,  he 
had  a  family  of  six  children :  Jessie,  Elsie,  Edith,  Olive,  Mary  and  George. 

John  M.  Oren  had  common  school  privileges  during  his  youth,  but  was 
only  twelve  years  old  when  he  began  work,  loading  canalboats.  At  the  age  of 
fifteen  he  began  to  leam  the  trade  of  machinist,  with  Robert  Allison,  in  whose 
employ  he  continued  for  a  period  of  twenty-eight  years.  In  1901  he  took 
a  position  with  the  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Company,  and  he  was  also  employed 
at  his  trade  in  Virginia,  Ohio  and  various  places  in  Pennsylvania,  bemg  so 
occupied  until  January,  1909,  when  he  assumed  the  duties  of  his  present 
position,  to  which  he  was  appointed.  Mr.  Oren  has  proved  himself  worthy 
of  the  confidence  of  his  fellow  citizens,  and  is  looking  after  their  interests 
well.  He  is  a  Republican  on  political  questions,  and  socially  holds  member- 
ship in  the  local  lodge  of  Elks,  No.  207,  and  in  the  Sons  of  America. 

On  May  13,  1880,  Mr.  Oren  married  Annie  E.  Bailey,  sister  of  Samuel  S.^ 
Bailey,  recorder  of  Schuylkill  county.     No  children  have  been  bom  to  this 
marriage.    Mr.  and  Mrs.  Oren  reside  at  Port  Carbon. 

DANIEL  LOCH  is  the  owner  of  valuable  farm  property  in  West  Penn 
township,  and  is  busily  engaged  in  its  cultivation  and  in  lumbering,  which  he 
has  carried  on  successfully  for  a  number  of  years.  He  is  a  native  of  the 
township,  bom  Jan.  22,  1858,  on  the  place  now  owned  by  Daniel  L.  Miller, 
and  is  a  grandson  of  George  Loch,  who  founded  the  family  here. 

George  Loch,  the  grandfather,  came  to  this  section  from  Lehigh  county, 
and  settled  in  West  Penn  township,  where  he  worked  at  his  trade  of  weaver 
all  his  life.     He  and  his  wife  were  members  of  Zion's  Lutheran  Church  in 


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728  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

West  Penn  township,  and  they  are  buried  at  that  church.  He  was  a  Republi- 
can in  politics.  His  children,  all  now  deceased,  were:  Samuel,  Jonas  (who 
married  a  Holshoe),  George,  Mary  (wife  of  Daniel  L.  Miller,  of  West  Penn 
township),  Maria  (who  married  George  Schmidt,  both  dying  in  Philadelphia) 
and  Amos. 

George  Loch,  father  of  Daniel  Loch,  was  bom  and  grew  up  in  West  Penn 
township,  receiving  his  education  in  the  public  schools.  Fanning  was  his 
life  work.  AboUt  the  time  he  reached  his  majority  he  married,  and  after 
working  arotmd  among  farmers  he  bought  thirty  acres  from  John  Hartung, 
where  he  followed  general  agriculture  all  his  active  years,  retiring  some  five 
years  before  his  death,  whidi  occurred  at  Mantz,  in  West  Penn  township, 
when  he  was  fifty-nine  years  of  age.  He  was  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  war,  a 
stanch  Republican  in  politics,  and  a  sincere  Christian,  one  of  the  valued  mem- 
bers and  workers  of  the  Evangelical  Church  in  his  township,  which  he  served 
as  elder,  deacon  and  in  all  the  other  offices.  He  was  also  superintendent  of 
the  Simday  school.  Mr.  Loch  married  Kate  Beibleheimer,  daughter  of  George 
and  Kate  (Yeager)  Beibleheimer,  natives  of  West  Penn  township,  and  chil- 
dren as  follows  were  bom  to  them :  Joseph,  who  lives  in  West  Penn  township, 
married  Sarah  Lutz,  and  their  children  are  George,  Eva,  Qinton,  Pierce, 
Howard,  Mamie  and  Sadie;  Daniel  is  next  in  the  family;  Noah,  a  farmer 
and  lumberman,  residing  at  Sittler  (Andreas),  this  county,  married  Mary  A. 
Staudt,  and  they  have  had  two  children,  Charles  Edwin  (deceased)  and  William 
A.;  George  A.,  who  lives  at  Nesquehoning,  Carbon  Co.,  Pa.,  and  is  engaged 
as  a  section  foreman  on  the  Central  railroad  of  New  Jersey,  married  Emma 
Bachert,  and  their  children  are  Edward  and  Mabel;  Fred  B.,  proprietor  of 
the  "Lansford  House,"  at  Lansford,  Pa.,  married  Annie  Kemmerer,  and  they 
have  one  child,  Gertrude;  Kate,  wife  of  William  Freeman,  of  Allentown, 
Pa.,  fireman  at  a  brewery,  has  children,  Mazie,  Erma,  Robert,  Allen  and 
Herbert;  Sallie  is  married  to  Edward  Kem,  of  Lehighton,  and  their  children 
are  Harry,  Florence,  Edward,  Guy,  Leroy,  Arline  and  Paul.  The  parents 
are  buried  at  the  Evangelical  Church  in  West  Penn  township. 

Daniel  Loch  was  reared  and  educated  in  West  Penn  township,  attending 
Bolich's  school,  and  was  trained  to  farming,  working^  for  his  father  until  he 
left  home,  at  the  age  of  eighteen  years.  He  was  employed  by  various  farmers 
until  twenty-one  years  old,  when  he  went  to  Shamokin,  Pa.,  where  he  worked 
at  the  coal  breaker  for  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Company  for 
four  months,  following  which  he  spent  over  a  year  at  Audenried,  Carbon 
county,  with  Weaver  &  Dick,  contractors,  stripping  coal.  His  next  removal 
was  to  Wilkes-Barre,  Pa.,  where  he  learned  the  carpenter's  trade,  serving  an 
apprenticeship  with  George  D.  Silvis,  under  whom  he  became  quite  proficient 
at  house  building  and  similar  work.  Returning  to  West  Penn  township  in 
the  year  1882,  he  followed  his  trade  at  Sittler,  his  first  job  being  on  the  erec- 
tion of  the  store  of  the  late  T.  E.  Sittler.  He  remained  at  that  location  until 
May,  1883,  when  he  married,  thereafter  continuing  his  trade  for  a  number  of 
years.  For  about  three  years  he  lived  with  his  brother  Noah  at  Sittler.  In 
1887  he  built  the  house  he  has  since  occupied,  in  West  Penn  township  in  the 
vicinity  of  Sittler,  and  a  few  years  later  bought  the  old  Rubrecht  farm,  adjoin- 
ing his  dwelling  site,  from  Francis  K.  Mantz,  a  tract  of  one  hundred  acres, 
of  which  seventy-five  are  cleared.  He  bought  another  tract  in  West  Penn 
township,  containing  fifty  acres,  and  cut  the  timber  from  twenty  acres  of  that 
property,  all  of  which  is  now  clear,  Mr.  Loch  farming  both  his  tracts  and 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  729 

finding  profitable  occupatioq  in  general  agriculture.  For  a  number  of  years 
he  has  also  carried  on  lumbering,  buying  timber  tracts,  cutting  the  wood  and 
hiring  saw-mills  for  its  manufacture,  and  then  marketing  the  finished  product. 
His  operations  in  this  line  are  all  in  West  Penn  township. 

Mr.  Loch  is  recognized  as  a  thoroughly  progressive  character  wherever 
his  interests  take  him.  He  has  long  been  a  leadmg  member  of  Washington 
Camp  No.  615,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  of  Sittler,  Pa.,  which  he  served  eight  years  in 
the  capacity  of  financial  secretary,  and  he  is  at  present  treasurer  of  the  organ- 
ization. As  a  member  of  Blue  Ridge  Lodge,  No.  IJ53,  I.  O.  O.  F.,  of  Sittler, 
he  is  one  of  the  best  known  Odd  Fellows  in  this  part  of  Pennsylvania,  being 
a  past  grand  of  his  own  lodge  and  its  present  secretary,  and  he  was  a  delegate 
to  the  State  convention  held  at  Harrisburg  in  May,  1909;  he  had  the  past 
grand  degree  conferred  upon  him  at  Harrisburg.  In  political  principle  he  is 
a  Republican,  and  he  has  been  associated  with  the  local  activities  of  the  party, 
having  served  as  election  inspector ;  though  not  an  office  seeker  he  is  interested 
in  the  proper  administration  of  township  aflFairs,  and  he  is  serving  as  registry 
assessor  of  the  Southeast  district  of  West  Penn.  His  religious  ccwinection  is 
with  Zion's  Reformed  Church  in  his  home  township. 

Mr.  Loch  was  married  at  Lehighton,  Pa.,  by  Rev.  Abraham  Bartholomew, 
to  Fianna  Rebecca  Staudt,  who  was  bom  Apnl  13,  1865,  at  Bemville,  Berks 
Co.,  Pa.,  daughter  of  Jrfm  Fisher  and  Sarah  (Snyder)  Staudt,  and  obtained 
her  schooling  in  West  Penn  township.  She  remained  at  home  until  her  mar- 
riage. Mrs.  Loch  is  a  member  of  Zion's  Reformed  Church.  By  this  union 
there  is  one  child,  Charles  Calvin,  who  was  bom  Sept.  8,  1884,  received  his 
education  at  Sittler,  and  has  always  worked  with  his  father,  whom  he  assists 
at  both  farming  and  lumbering.  He  is  married  to  Amanda  Hoppes,  who  was 
bom  April  28,  1890,  in  West  Penn  township,  daughter  of  Solomon  and  Caro- 
line (Eberts)  Hoppes,  farming  people  of  that  township,  now  living  retired. 
They  have  one  child,  Hattie  Caroline,  born  Feb.  2,  191 1.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Loch 
also  have  an  adopted  child,  her  niece,  the  daughter  of  Frank  Leiby  and  grand- 
daughter of  Johri  F.  Staudt.  She  has  lived  with  them  from  the  age  of  six 
years,  and  is  now  nineteen. 

The  Staudts  are  an  old  Berks  county  family,  and  Mrs.  Loch  is  a  daughter 
of  John  Fisher  Staudt,  granddaughter  of  Daniel  Staudt,  and  great-grand- 
daughter of  Johannes  Staudt  who  married  a  Christ.  Daniel  btaudt  mar- 
ried Mary  Ann  Fisher,  and  their  children  were :  Mary  Ann,  Adam,  Joshua, 
Eliza  Ann,  Fayetta,  Alfred,  Johannes  Fisher,  Emilie  Sara  Ann,  Daniel  Jared 
and  Aaron. 

John  (Johannes)  Fisher  Staudt  was  bom  Feb.  18,  1841,  in  Penn  town- 
ship, Berks  county,  and  spent  his  early  life  in  that  coimty.  When  he  settled 
in  Schuylkill  county  he  carried  on  a  feed  and  grocery  business  at  Pottsville 
for  one  year,  and  has  since  been  a  resident  of  West  Penn  township,  owning 
and  operating  what  is  probably  the  oldest  mill  property  in  the  county.  He 
has  been  county  surveyor,  postmaster  at  Staudtsville,  and  member  of  the 
township  school  board,  and  has  been  long  regarded  as  one  of  the  most  useful 
members  of  his  community.  He  is  now  living  retired,  but  retains  the  over- 
sight of  all  his  aflFairs.  All  his  children  were  bom  to  his  first  marriage,  with 
Sarah  Snyder,  viz.:  Mary  Ann  (Mrs.  Noah  Loch),  Sarah  A.  V.  (Mrs.  Frank 
Leiby),  Hiram  Henry,  Alvin,  Milton,  Fianna  R.  (Mrs.  Daniel  Loch),  Ellen 
(Mrs.  James  Muth),  John,  Charles  William,  Daniel  Jacob  and  Clara  (Mrs. 
William  Stabler).     For  his  second  wife  Mr.  Staudt  married  Mrs.  Carolina 


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730  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

(Osenbach)  Schrack,  widow  of  Aaron  Schrack,  and  daughter  of  Daniel 
Osenbach.  A  full  account  of  the  Staudt  family  appears  elsewhere  in  this 
work. 

FRANK  L.  BENSINGER  is  farming  the  old  Bensinger  homestead  in 
East  Brunswick  township,  and  is  known  as  an  estimable  representative  of  a 
family  whose  members  in  every  generation  have  been  respected  for  intelligent 
citizenship  and  substantial  character.  He  is  one  of  the  fourth  generation  of 
Bensingers  in  East  Brunswick  township,  Schuylkill  county,  being  a  great- 
grandson  of  Frederick  Bensinger,  the  progenitor  ^of  many  of  the  name  in  this 
locality,  who  was  bom  in  Montgomery  county.  Pa.,  and  settled  in  East  Bruns- 
wick township  before  the  Revolution.  When  the  war  broke  out  he  was 
engaged  in  farming  there,  and  he  left  his  private  affairs  to  go  to  the  assistance 
of  the  Colonies.  In  his  later  years  he  received  a  pension  for  his  services. 
He  married  Mary  Weiman,  and  had  a  family  of  eight  children,  one  of  whom, 
Jacob,  married  Hannah  Dreher,  and  was  the  ancestor  of  another  branch  of 
the  family  in  East  Brunswick  township. 

Michael  Bensinger,  son  of  Frederick,  was  a  farmer  in  East  Brunswick 
township,  where  he  owned  about  seventy-five  acres  of  land.  He  cleared  that 
tract,  erected  a  log  house,  and  bam,  and  carried  on  general  farming  the  greater 
part  of  his  life.  He  had  the  following  children:  Edward  married  Sarah 
Heiser,  and  both  are  deceased ;  William,  deceased,  married  a  Miss  Fister ; 
Franklin  B.  is  next  in  the  family ;  Benneville  married  Caroline  Fahl,  and  both 
are  deceased;  Fred  married  a  Miss  Bock,  and  they  reside  at  McKeansburg; 
Priscilla  married  Thomas  Hartung,  and  both  are  deceased.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Bensinger  are  buried  in  the  Steigerwalt  cemetery  in  East  Bmnswick  town- 
ship.   He  was  a  Whig  in  politics. 

Franklin  B.  Bensinger  was  bom  in  East  Bmnswick  township  in  March, 
1822,  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  the  local  district,  and  spent  his  youth 
and  early  manhood  assisting  his  father  on  the  farm.  After  his  father's  death 
he  bought  out  the  other  heirs  to  the  homestead  farm,  which  he  operated  all 
his  life.  His  wife,  Catherine  (Shuster),  who  was  bom  in  September,  1821, 
and  died  in  March,  1899,  was  a  daughter  of  Martin  Shuster,  whose  wife  was 
a  Koons.  Mr.  Bensinger  died  in  March,  1898.  He  and  his  wife  had  the  fol- 
lowing children :  John  went  West,  and  is  now  deceased ;  Howard,  a  farmer 
in  West  Bmnswick  township,  married  Emma  Leiby ;  Charles  S.  married  Ida 
Baer;  Frank  L.  is  mentioned  below;  Harry,  who  is  a  foreman  in  a  silk  mill  at 
Tamaqua,  married  Cora  Albright;  Thomas,  deceased,  married  Elmira  Horn, 
who  resides  in  McKeansburg ;  Dora  married  W.  S.  Miller,  of  East  Bmnswick 
township;  Mary  married  W.  H.  Yost,  of  Reading;  Susan  is  the  widow 
of  James  Shoener,  and  lives  at  Hamburg,  Pa. ;  Lizzie  is  the  widow  of  Oscar 
Kimmel,  and  makes  her  home  at  Port  Carbon ;  Kate  married  J.  A.  Shellham- 
mer,  of  Port  Carbon;  Carrie  married  J.  A.  Yost,  of  Ringtown,  this  county. 
Politically  Mr.  Bensinger  was  a  Republican.  He  was  an  earnest  member  of 
the^ Church  of  God  and  very  active  in  its  work,  serving  as  trustee  and  in  other 
capacities.  His  wife  was  also  a  member.  They  ^re  buried  in  the  Steigerwalt 
cemetery  in  East  Bmnswick  township. 

Frank  L.  Bensinger  was  bom  Dec.  5,  i860,  on  the  place  where  he  now 
lives,  the  old  Bensinger  homestead.  His  education  was  acquired  in  the  East 
Bmnswick  schools,  and  he  worked  for  his  father  on  the  homestead  farm  until 
1883,  when  he  went  to  Ohio.    After  doing  farm  work  there  for  one  year  he 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  731 

returned  home  and  entered  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Rail- 
way Company,  as  coal  flagman  on  the  main  line  from  Palo  Alto  to  Port  Rich- 
mond, Philadelphia,  remaining  with  that  company  for  two  years,  when  he 
moved  to  McKeansburg.  He  worked  for  his  father  another  three  years,  and 
then  rented  the  Steigerwalt  farm,  near  the  Steigerwalt  church  (now  owned 
by  E.  H.  Kunkel),  being  tenant  on  that  farm  for  nine  years.  At  the  end 
of  that  time  he  bought  the  homestead  tract,  where  he  has  resided  ever  since, 
engaged  in  general  farming  and  trucking.  He  makes  two  trips  a  week  to  the 
markets  of  New  Philadelphia  and  St.  Clair.  Mr.  Bensinger  has  found  time 
to  take  part  in  the  township  government,  has  been  elected  school  director  and 
auditor,  and  has  been  associated  with  politics  as  a  Republican.  Socially  he 
belongs  to  Washington  Camp  No.  loo,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  of  New  Ringgold,  and 
to  Protection  Council,  No.  935,  Order  of  Independent  Americans,  of  Mc- 
Keansburg ;  at  one  time  he  was  very  active  in  the  work  of  the  latter  organiza- 
tion, but  never  held  any  elective  office.  In  religion  he  leans  toward  the  teach- 
ings of  the  Evangelical  Association. 

Mr.  Bensinger  married  Ida  Albright,  a  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Catherine 
(Kershner)  Albright,  and  they  have  had  one  child,  Eva  May;  she  was  edu- 
cated in  the  East  Brunswick  schools  and  the  Keystone  State  Normal  School, 
graduating  with  the  class  of  1913,  and  was  married  to  Leon  Kimmel  in  191 5. 
Previously  she  taught  school  at  Rauschs  and  Kepners,  in  East  Brunswick 
township. 

Mrs.  Ida  (Albright)  Bensinger  was  bom  and  educated  in  West  Brunswick 
township,  and  lived  at  home  until  married.  Her  grandfather,  Joseph  Albright, 
was  a  farmer  in  West  Brunswick  township,  owning  120  acres,  nearly  all  of 
which  he  had  under  cultivation.  He  married  Esther  Sharadin,  and  they  had 
children:  Thomas;  Susanna,  widow  of  Solomon  Moyer;  Morgan,  who  mar- 
ried a  Deibert;  Benneville,  who  married  Mary  Hicks  (both  are  deceased); 
Lucian,  deceased,  who  married  Isabella  Hoy;  and  William,  who  married  a 
Miss  Bodey.  The  father  died  when  over  seventy  years  old,  the  mother  when 
over  sixty,  and  they  are  buried  at  St.  John's  Reformed  Church,  Orwigsburg, 
of  which  Mr.  Albright  was  a  member.    He  was  a  Democrat  politically. 

Thomas  Albright,  son  of  Joseph,  was  educated  in  West  Brunswick  town- 
ship and  at  the  Keystone  State  Normal  School  at  Kutztown,  where  he  spent 
one  year.  He  worked  for  his  father  on  the  farm  until  after  his  marriage. 
He  operated  his  grandfather  Kershner*s  farm  at  Drehersville  for  about  eight 
years,  and  then  moved  to  Orwigsburg  and  lived  retired  for  one  year.  His 
next  removal  was  to  the  homestead  farm,  which  he  had  bought  from  his 
father,  and  he  operated  it  for  eleven  years,  at  the  end  of  that  time  removing 
to  AUentown,  where  he  is  now  employed  by  Dr.  Albright.  Mr.  Albright  is 
now  (1915)  seventy-seven  years  old.  He  married  Catherine  Kershner,  daugh- 
ter of  Daniel  and  Judith  (Fegley)  Kershner,  and  they  had  five  children: 
Thomas  and  Lewis  died  young;  Calvin  married  Ella  Shoener,  of  Tamaqua; 
Ida  is  Mrs.  Bensinger;  Cora  married  Harry  Bensinger.  Mrs.  Albright  died 
in  March,  1895,  and  is  buried  at  Orwigsburg.  Mr.  Albright  is  a  member  of 
St.  John's  Reformed  Church,  of  Orwigsburg,  Pa.  He  is  a  Democrat  in 
politics. 

ALEXANDER  KAUFMAN,  who  is  now  living  in  the  borough  of  Gor- 
don, was  bom  March  23,  1850,  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  this  county,  where  his 
grandfather,  George  Kaufman,  settled  about  1825.    The  latter  was  born  Nov. 


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732  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

6,  1788,  in  Upper  Bern  township,  then  in  Montgomery  county.  Pa.,  and  on 
coming  to  Schuylkill  Haven  engaged  in  the  flour  and  feed  business,  remaining 
there  until  his  death,  April  3,  1838.    He  had  but  one  child,  George. 

George  Kaufman,  father  of  Alexander  Kaufman,  was  bom  in  Upper  Bern 
township,  Montgomery  Co.,  Pa.,  March  25,  181 1,  and  spent  most  of  his  life 
at  Schuylkill  Haven,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  was  a  business  man  for  over 
fifty  years,  engaged  in  merchandising.  He  served  as  county  poor  director  one 
term,  as  school  director  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  and  held  other  offices.  His 
death  occurred  at  Schuylkill  Haven  Oct.  16,  1883.  Mr.  Kaufman  married 
Elmire  Boyer,  who  was  bom  Nov.  25,  1818,  in  Norwegian  township,  Schuyl- 
kill county,  of  which  township  her  father,  George  Boyer,  was  also  a  native. 
He  was  a  farmer  there,  owning  what  was  called  the  Boyer  tract,  between 
Gordon  and  Pottsville.  Selling  this  property  he  moved  to  Jefferson  county, 
where  he  died.  Of  his  seven  children,  four  sons  and  three  daughters,  three 
survive:  Benjamin,  George  and  Hannah,  all  residents  of  Jefferson  county. 
Pa.  Mrs.  Kaufman  passed  away  Sept.  28,  1892.  She  was  the  mother  of  eleven 
children,  namely:  John  G.,  the  eldest,  born  Jan.  19,  1838,  is  deceased; 
Charles  F.,  bom  Jan.  10,  1840,  died  Sept.  19,  1908;  Elmira,  bom  Feb.  22,  1842, 
died  July  3,  1844;  Emma  L.,  bom  Oct.  13,  1844,  died  April  29,  1846;  George 
B.,  bom  Oct.  3,  1846,  died  March  14,  1913;  William  L.,  bom  Feb.  16,  1849, 
died  July  25,  1876;  Alexander  is  next  in  the  family;  Alice  R.,  bom  June  5, 
1853,  lives  at  Schuylkill  Haven;  Lewis,  bom  Sept.  7,  1855,  died  May  i,  1910; 
Edward,  bom  Oct.  5,  1857,  ^^  ^  resident  of  Philadelphia;  Samuel  L.,  bom 
Feb.  25,  1861,  lives  at  Schuylkill  Haven. 

Alexander  Kaufman  received  his  education  at  Schuylkill  Haven,  where 
his  early  life  was  spent.  For  a  few  years  during  his  young  manhood  he 
clerked  in  a  store  at  Raven  Run,  for  E.  H.  Heaton,  and  then  engaged  in  busi- 
ness at  that  place  on  his  own  account  for  about  three  years,  at  the  end  of 
which  period  he  sold  out.  Coming 'to  Girardville  he  again  embarked  in  busi- 
ness, remaining  at  that  point  until  his  removal  to  Gordon,  in  1890.  He  had 
come  to  the  borough  J)reviously,  in  1866,  remaining  until  1881,  and  had  great 
faith  in  its  possibilities  as  a  business  location,  and  he  was  not  disappointed 
in  his  expectations,  for  he  had  a  successful  career  as  a  merchant  up  to  the  time 
of  his  retirement.  He  has  always  been  considered  one  of  the  substantial  citi- 
zens of  the  place.  In  1890  he  was  elected  to  the  office  of  supervisor  of  Butler 
township,  and  reelected  the  next  year.  For  thirteen  years  he  has  served  as 
assessor  of  the  borough  of  Gordon,  discharging  the  duties  of  that  office  to  the 
eminent  satisfaction  of  all  concemed.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Lutheran  Church 
of  Gordon. 

On  Dec.  25,  1875,  Mr.  Kaufman  was  married  to  Josephine  Kleber,  who 
was  bom  at  Pottsville  March  5,  1855,  and  died  Jan.  15,  191 5.  The  following 
children  were  bom  to  this  union,  viz.:  William  died  Oct.  13,  1891 ;  Lewis, 
who  lives  at  Gordon,  is  an  employee  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway 
Company ;  Raymond,  who  lives  at  Gordon,  is  in  the  same  employ ;  Carrie  is 
the  wife  of  Samuel  Rubright,  of  Mount  Carmel ;  Anna  is  the  wife  of  Charles 
Rinehart,  of  Mount  Carmel;  Alexander  died  Dec.  2,  1881.  Mr.  Kaufman 
owns  the  home  at  Gordon  which  he  occupies  with  his  family. 

Louis  and  Phoebe  (Wikel)  Kleber,  Mrs.  Kaufman's  parents,  were  natives 
of  Germany,  the  father  bom  Dec.  28,  1828,  the  mother  May  4,  1832.  They 
were  married  in  that  country,  and  on  coming  to  America  first  settled  at  Potts- 
ville, Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  thence  moving  to  Cressona  and  later  to  Gordon. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  733 

Mr.  Kleber  was  a  coppersmith,  and  for  many  years  was  in  the  employ  of  the 
Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company.  He  died  Nov.  lo,  1899,  ^^d  his 
wife  survived  him  a  number  of  years,  passing  away  Feb.  20,  1914.  Their 
family  consisted  of  seven  children:  Josephine,  Mrs.  Kaufman;  Lewis,  who 
lives  at  Easton,  Pa.;  Charles,  a  retired  butcher,  of  Gordon,  Pa.;  Anna,  wife 
of  Fred  Dreher,  a  retired  merchant  of  Gordon ;  William,  a  machinist,  of  New 
York;  Ida,  wife  of  John  F.  Dreher,  a  merchant  of  Gordon;  and  Harry, 
deceased. 

BENJAMIN  SHAPPELL  is  making  a  reputation  for  himself  as  a  pro- 
gressive agriculturist  in  North  Manheim  township,  this  county,  where  he  owns 
over  200  acres  of  valuable  land.  He  is  giving  all  his  time  to  farming  operations, 
making  a  specialty  of  fruit  growing  and  dairying,  in  both  of  which  lines  he  has 
done  particularly  well.  The  branch  of  the  Shappell  family  to  which  he  belongs 
was  established  in  Schuylkill  county  by  Jacob  Shappell,  his  grandfather,  who 
moved  hither  from  Berks  county,  where  the  n^me  is  of  record  from  the  days 
of  its  settlement. 

In  Perry  township,  Berks  county,  which  until  185^  was  a  part  of  Windsor 
township,  Berks  county,  is  a  prominent  family  bearing  the  name  of  Schap- 
pelle,  Choppelle,  Schobbel,  Shobel,  but  now  more  commonly  found  spelled 
Shappell,  Schappel  and  Schappell.  The  original  home  of  the  family  was  in 
France,  but  through  religious  persecution  its  members  sought  refuge  in  Ger- 
many, making  their  home  at  Wittenberg.  Among  the  108  passengers  on  the 
good  ship  "Patience,'"  which  landed  at  the  port  of  Philadelphia  Sept.  17,  1753, 
was  a  Jeremie  Chappelle  and  one  Jean  Pierre  Chappelle.  The  kinship  of  these 
two  emigrants  is  unknown,  but  it  is  not  doubted  that  they  were  relatives.  What 
became  of  Jean  Pierre  after  landing  in  the  New  World  is  not  known.  Jere- 
mias  Schappelle  (as  it  appears  on  the  tombstone)  (or  Schobel)  and  Eberhart 
Schoppel,  brothers,  were  residents  in  Windsor  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  in 
1754  (see  Rupp's  History). 

According  to  the  tombstone  inscription  at  Zion's  Church,  in  Perry  (formerly 
Windsor)  township,  Jeremias  Schappelle  was  bom  in  1715,  and  he  died  Oct. 

15,  1804.  His  wife  Catharine,  bom  in  1724,  passed  away  June  8,  1801.  The 
will  of  Jeremiah  Shappel  (sic)  is  on  record  in  Berks  county  courthouse  in  Will 
Book  A,  page  505.  It  was  made  Feb.  11,  1803,  and  probated  Jan.  7,  1805.  At 
the  time  the  will  was  made  he  was  a  resident  of  Windsor  township.  The  fol- 
lowing children  were  mentioned  in  the  will:  Jacob  (who  was  made  executor  of 
his  father's  estate)  ;  Matthias,  Jeremiah,  Magdalena  and  Catharine.  In  the 
cemetery  at  Zion's  Church  is  a  tombstone  bearing  the  following  inscription: 
"Elizabeth  Schappelle,  wife  of  Jeremias,  formerly  of  Deutschland,  bora  Feb. 

16,  1771,  died  July  9,  1817,  aged  forty-six  years,  five  months,  twenty-three 
days."  This  probably  refers  to  the  wife  of  Jeremias  or  Jeremiah,  son  of  Jere- 
mias (I). 

No  records  of  the  descendants  of  Eberhart  Schoppel  are  in  evidence  at 
Zion's  Union  Church.  He  may  have  left  Windsor  township  after  1744,  in 
which  year  he  hewed  his  name  on  a  stone  now  in  the  southeastern  wall  of  the 
old  graveyard.  Tradition  says  that  the  stones  upon  which  these  names  were 
carved  (one  bears  the  name  of  Jeremias),  were  once  a  part  of  the  wall  of  the 
first  church.    The  fourth  church  was  in  co\^rse  of  constmction  in  1908. 

Jacob  Schappell,  son  of  Jeremias,  was  better  known  as  "J^l^^X/'  ^  nick- 
name evidently  taken  from  the  German  pronunciation  of  his  name.    He  was 


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734  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

bom  in  Wittenberg,  Germany,  Feb.  2,  1744,, and  died  Sept.  11,  1826.  As 
stated  above  he  was  the  executor  of  his  father's  will  in  1805.  His  wife  Su- 
sanna was  born  Feb.  2,  1751,  and  died  July  24,  1828.  They  are  both  buried 
at  Zion's  Church.  Jeremias,  Eberhart  and  Jockey  Schappell  were  founders 
of  the  original  Zion's  Church.  Tradition  says  Jacob  and  Susanna  had  a  large 
family,  some  of  their  children,  however,  dying  in  infancy  and. childhood.  Of 
those  of  whom  there  is  record  may  be  mentioned:  Peter,  bom  April  19,  1770; 
Col.  Jeremiah,  bom  March  20,  1774;  Daniel,  who  was  a  t^able  resident  in 
Manheim  township,  Schuylkill  county,  in  1790,  where  he  reared  a  family  and 
where  his  descendants  still  live;  and  Hannah,  married  to  Georg  Hoffman,  a 
farmer  of  Perry  township. 

There  is  a  valley  in  Perry  township  known  to  the  local  residents  as  Schap- 
peirs  Dale,  because  of  the  many  Shappells  living  there. 

Peter  Schappell,  son  of  Jacob  and  Susanna,  was  bom  April  19,  1770,  and 
died  Nov.  18,  1851.  He  was  a  farmer  in  Windsor  township,  and  he  and  his 
family  all  belonged  to  Zion's  Church,  and  are  buried  in  the  cemetery  there. 
His  first  wife  was  Elizabeth  (Lenhart)  (1768-1790),  and  his  second  Annie 
(Kosch)  (1778-1841).  His  children  ^ere :  Jacob,  who  located  in  Schuylkill 
county;  Benjamin,  who  died  young;  Daniel,  who  settled  in  Schuylkill  county; 
Samuel,  who  settled  in  Windsor  township;  John,  who  settled  in  Richmond 
township,  Berks  county;  Mary,  married  to  William  Miller;  Kate,  married  to 
Martin  Eisenhaur;  Elizabeth,  married  to  Jacob  Boyer;  a  daughter  married  to 
Anthony  Adam;  and  Solomon.  ^ 

Jacob  Shappell  lived  at  Shartlesville,  in  Berks  county,  until  his  removal 
to  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  settled  in  North  Manheim  township  with  his 
family.  Purchasing  a  tract  of  land,  he  followed  farming  successfully  during 
the  remainder  of  his  days,  dying  here,  and  is  buried  in  the  old  cemetery  at 
Schuylkill  Haven.  His  children  were  as  follows:  Jacob,  who  died  in  North- 
umberland county,  Pa. ;  Samuel ;  David,  who  died  in  Schuylkill  county ;  Mary, 
who  married  John  Womer ;  and  Lydia,  Mrs.  Long. 

Samuel  Shappell,  son  of  Jacob,  was  bom  in  1825  at  Shartlesville,  Berks 
county,  accompanied  his  father  to  Schuylkill  county,  and  passed  the  remainder 
of  his  life  here.  After  working  several  years  as  a  boatbuilder  he  bought  the 
J.  Womer  farm,  in  North  Manheim  township,  comprising  twenty  acres,  and 
later  increased  his  holdings  by  the  purchase  of  part  of  his  father's  homestead, 
as  well  as  part  of  the  Pryor  estate.  He  also  acquired  part  of  the  Osewald  farm 
and  some  land  from  Fred  Hinckle,  having  a  total  of  108  acres.  He  carried  on 
general  farming  and  was  also  in  the  timber  business  j  for  many  years,  becom- 
ing a  well  known  man  in  his  day.  He  was  a  Democrat,  and  in  religion  a  mem- 
ber of  the  Reformed  Church,  in  which  he  was  active,  holding  the  position  of 
deacon.  Mr.  Shappell  married  Sarah  Oswald,  who  was  bom  in  1823,  daugh- 
ter of  Daniel  Oswald,  and  lived  to  the  age  of  eighty-two  years,  dying  in  1906. 
His  death  occurred  many  years  before,  in  1884,  when  he  was  fifty-nine  years 
old.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Shappell  are  buried  in  the  Union  cemetery  at  Schuylkill 
Haven.  They  had  a  large  family,  namely :  George  W.,  an  engineer,  now  liv- 
ing at  Palo  Alto,  this  county ;  Henry,  who  is  a  resident  of  Philadelphia ;  Sarah, 
deceased ;  Maria,  Mrs.  Frank  Luckenbill,  living  in  North  Manheim  township ; 
Samuel,  who  went  West;  Benjamin ;  Hettie,  wife  of  Jonathan  Achey,  of  Allen- 
town,  Pa.;  Mahlon  and  Galen,  twins,  the  former  deceased,  the  latter  in  the 
West;  and  Isaac,  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  who  is  in  the  employ  of  the  Reading 
Company. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  735 

Benjamin  Shappell  was  bom  Jan.  30,  1859,  on  the  place  inNorth  Manheim 
township  which  he  now  owns  and  occupies.  He  was  reared  there,  attending 
public  school  in  the  neighborhood,  and  lived  at  home  until  twenty-seven  years 
old,  assisting  in  the  cultivation  of  the  home  farm.  Then  for  six  years  he  was 
in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railroad  Company,  as  a  brake- 
man  on  the  Mine  Hill  division.  During  this  period  he  bought  the  homestead 
and  the  stock,  and  upon  giving  up  railroad  work  returned  to  the  property, 
where  he  has  since  remained,  giving  all  his  time  to  agricultural  work.  To  the 
original  108  acres  which  his  father  owned  he  has  added  by  various  purchases, 
first  buying  sixty-two  acres  of  the  Charles  Dealer  estate  and  later  sixty-four 
acres  from  Joel  Fisher's  estate,  having  sold  ten  acres  to  the  borough  of  Schuyl- 
kill Haven  for  the  waterworks.  He  has  at  present  215  acres,  all  excellent  land, 
of  which  eighty-five  acres  are  cleared  and  under  high  cultivation.  Mr.  Shap- 
pell has  set  out  over  five  hundred  peach  trees,  which  have  produced  very  profit- 
ably. He  has  also  ^ven  considerable  attention  to  dairying,  keeping  twelve 
milch  cows,  and  retails  the  product  himself,  having  a  milk  route  at  Schuylkill 
Haven.  The  intelligent  system  which  he  has  followed  in  the  improvement  and 
development  of  his  farm  has  brought  him  excellent  results,  his  thorough  busi- 
ness methods  having  been  quite  as  important  in  his  success  as  his  careful  agri- 
cultural work.  He  has  served  as  school  director  of  his  township,  but  aside 
from  that  has  given  little  attention  to  affairs  outside  of  his  business.  Politically 
he  is  a  Democrat,  in  religious  connection  a  member  of  the  Reformed  Church. 

Mr.  Shappell  married  Susan  Honickell,  daughter  of  Philip  Honickell,  a 
native  of  Germany,  who  came  to  America  when  forty  years  old,  and  settled  in 
Schuylkill  county.  Six  children  have  been  bom  to  this  marriage:  Bertha  is 
the  wife  of  D.  Fisher,  of  Schuylkill  Haven ;  Philip  died  young ;  Alexander  is 
at  home ;  Frederick  was  accidentally  killed  when  sixteen  years  old  while  haul- 
ing stone,  the  team  running  away ;  Amelia  and  John  are  at  home. 

JOEI^  A.  DINGER,  late  of  Pottsville,  was  a  business  man  of  Schuylkill 
county  throughout  his  active  years,  and  from  the  time  of  his  removal  to  Potts- 
ville was  engaged  in  hotelkeeping.  His  widow  is  still  conducting  the  "City 
Hotel,"  of  which  he  was  proprietor  at  the  time  of  his  death.  Mr.  Dinger  be- 
longed to  a  well  known  family  of  Hegins  township,  Schuylkill  county,  and 
he  was  bom  there  April  8,  1851,  son  of  Jonathan  Dinger,  a  prosperous  farmer 
of  that  section. 

During  his  boyhood  Joel  A.  Dinger  had  the  advantages  of  the  local  public 
schools  in  Hegins  township,  and  then,  being  ambitious  ior  a  higher  education, 
attended  Selinsgrove  Academy  and  later  the  Keystone  State  Normal  School, 
at  Kutztown,  Pa.  When  a  young  man  he  taught  school'  in  Schuylkill  county 
for  several  years,  and  was  afterwards  employed  in  the  office  of  the  Bright 
lumber  yard,  at  Ashland,  Pa.,  where  he  remained  until  1887.  That  year  he 
came  to  Pottsville  and  took  charge  of  the  "Eagle  Hotel,"  which  he  conducted 
for  nine  years,  after  which  for  eleven  years  he  carried  on  the  "Exchange  Ho- 
tel" in  this  city.  He  disposed  of  his  interest  there  to  take  the  "City  Hotel," 
at  No.  440  North  Centre  street,  continuing  his  connection  therewith  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  Oct.  22,  19 14.  Mr.  Dinger  had  many  natural  qualifica- 
tions for  the  hotel  business,  and  in  his  long  experience  became  thoroughly  fa- 
miliar with  its  requirements.  His  obliging  disposition  manifested  itself  in  sin- 
cere efforts  to  please  his  guests,  and  their  appreciation  was  shown  in  continu- 
ous patronage.    He  made  many  friends  in  the  course  of  his  long  career  in  the 


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736  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

liotel  business,  and  was  equally  popular  wherever  known,  among  his  fellow 
members  of  the  local  lodge  of  Elks  and  in  the  Lutheran  Qhurch,  of  which  he 
was  a  meniber.    He  is  buried  in  the  Charies  Baber  cemetery  at  Pottsville. 

Mr.  Dinger  married  Kate  Long,  who  was  bom  in  Cameron  township, 
Northumberland  Co.,  Pa.,  daughter  of  Daniel  Long,  who  is  still  residing  on 
the  old  homestead  there.  Mrsv  Dinger  has  carried  on  the  "City  Hotel"  very 
successfully  since  her  husband's  death.  Two  children  were  bom  to  them: 
Neva  O.,  who  is  the  wife  of  Edwin  E.  Merrick,  of  Pottsville ;  and  Sadie  R., 
who  is  the  wife  of  Prof.  Walter  F.  Hertzog  (they  reside  in  California). 

Edwin  E.  Merrick  is  widely  known  in  Pottsville  in  his  capacity  as  super- 
intendent at  the  plant  of  the  Eastem  Steel  Company.  A  Scotchman  by  birth, 
he  was  bom  in  Glasgow  Sept.  i6,  1864,  son  of  Noah  Merrick,  who  upon  com- 
ing to  America  settled  at  Troy,  N.  Y.,  where  he  was  engaged  as  a  roller  in  the 
steel  mill.  He  now  resides  at  Paterson,  N.  J.  Edwin  E.  Merrick  received  a 
public  school  education,  and  in  his  youth  began  to  learn  the  steel  business  at 
Paterson,  N.  J.  After  several  years'  employment  there  he  worked  in  Chicago 
for  a  time,  in  May,  1906,  coming  to  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he 
took  a  position  as  roller  with  the  Eastem  Steel  Company.  Before  long  he  was 
promoted  to  the  position  of  superintendent  of  his  department,  and  has  since 
been  serving  as  such,  his  competency  and  intelligent  devotion  to  his  duties  rec- 
ommending him  to  the  confidence  of  the  executive  heads  of  the  concern.  Per- 
sonally he  is  a  man  of  high  character,  and  has  proved  himself  in  various  ways 
a  desirable  citizen  in  the  town  of  his  adoption.  He  is  a  member  of  the  B.  r. 
O.  Elks  Lodge  at  Pottsville. 

On  Feb.  4,  1910,  Mr.  Merrick  married  Neva  O.  Dinger,  daughter  of  the 
late  Joel  A.  Dinger,  and  they  have  a  fine  home  at  No.  2015  West  Market  street, 
Pottsville. 

BENJAMIN  FRANK  JAMES  was  bom  Aug.  19,  1873,  in  SchuylkiU 
county,  and  received  such  common  school  advantages  as  Shenandoah,  his  home 
town,  afforded.  After  reaching  his  majority  he  attended  business  collie  at 
Elmira,  New  Ycwk. 

The  Welsh  have  been  represented  by  many  successful  operators  and  capable 
miners  in  the  Pennsylvania  fields,  and  several  of  the  James  family  have  con- 
tributed to*  their  reputation  in  the  industry  of  leading  importance  in  this 
State.  Reared  in  the  very  heart  and  center  of  the  Pennsylvania  anthracite 
coal  regions,  and  with  his  father  interested  in  coal  operations,  Mr.  James  had 
the  opportunity  to  follow  his  inclinations,  and  by  the  time  he  reached  maturity 
had  a  familiar  knowledge  of  th6  mineral  deposits  of  the  State  and  their 
development.  At  the  time  of  the  death  of  l?is  father,  Mr.  James,  with  his 
three  brothers,  David  R.,  John  R.,  and  William  J.  James,  received  the  operation 
from  their  father  which  he  had  been  conducting  under  the  name  of  the 
Cambridge  Coal  Company.  At  the  present  writing  they  are  still  profitably 
working  at  that  colliery.  In  1906  Mr.  James,  with  his  three  brothers  before 
named,  leased  from  the  Gilbert  and  Sheafer  Estates  the  Girard  Mammoth 
colliery,  located  at  Raven  Run,  and  worked  this  colliery  very  successfully. 
Previous  to  their  having  taken  over  this  operation  it  had  been  operated  by 
the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Company  for  a  number  of  years. 

Encouraged  by  what  he  considered  the  favorable  outlook  in  the  slate 
regions,  he  was  one  of  a  party  who  organized  a  company  for  the  production 
and  manufacture  of  all  kinds  of  slate,  his  associates  in  the  organization  being 


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A^TOR,   LENOX 
TILDiLiN   i- GUN  DAT 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  737 

his  three  brothers,  and  J.  C.  McGinnis,  of  Frackville,  Pa.,  and  William 
Wilhelm,  of  Pottsville.  They  incorporated  under  the  name  of  the  Cambridge 
Slate  Company,  of  Slatington,  and  are  still  carrymg  on  extensive  and  profitable 
operations.  The  bfficers  of  the  company  are :  David  R.  James,  president  ; 
William  J.  James,  secretary,  and  Benjamin  F.  Janies,  treasurer  and  general 
manager. 

In  the  year  1914  Mr.  James  made  a  venture  in  the  Gilberton  valley  which 
has  developed  into  a  very  promising  operation.  He  was  accompanied  in  the 
enterprise  by  his  two  brothers,  David  R.  and  William  J.  They  leased  from 
the  Girard  Estate,  at  Gilberton,  Schuylkill  county,  the  East  Bear  Ridge  colliery. 
By  the  fall  of  1915  they  had  completed  preparations  for  its  operation,  and 
began  same  at  once.  Mr.  James  is  giving  his  closest  attention  to  its  compre- 
hensive development,  as  the  vast  workings  reopened  or  newly  opened  show. 
He  has  entered  into  this  big  task  fully  aware  of  the  responsibilities  attaching 
to  it,  but  with  no  doubt  as  to  the  outcome.  He  has  the  pluck  and  tenacity 
necessary  to  hold  him  to  his  duties  until  the  realization  of  his  ambitions  is 
attained,  and  has  the  experience  upon  which  much  of  his  success  must  depend. 
The  profitable  management  of  the  colliery  will  be  an  achievement  of  highest 
importance  and  will  mean  much  to  the  prosperity  of  the  district,  where 
thousands  look  to  the  coal  workings  for  their  means  of  earning  a  livelihood. 
With  the  enteiprising  methods  now  in  practice  in  the  East  Bear  Ridge  work- 
^  ings,  and  conditions  as  they  now  are,  great  promise  is  given  of  a  large  pro- 
duction. 

In  1896  Mr.  James  married  Mary  A.  Troutman,  daughter  of  Emanuel  and 
Sarah  Troutman,  and  their  children  are:  Mary,  a  cultured  musician,  who 
received  her  training  in  the  schools  at  Oak  Lane,  Philadelphia,  and  Dayton, 
Va. ;  Viola,  a  student  of  the  Pottsville  high  school;  Elva  May;  Elsie,  and 
Benjamin  F.,  Jr.  Mr.  James  and  his  family  are  associated  with  the  Baptist 
Church.  Fraternally  he  is  a  Mason,  holding  membership  in  the  Blue  Lodge  at 
Shenandoah,  Chapter  and  Commandery  at  Ashland,  and  Rajah  Temple,  A.  A. 
O.  N.  M.  S..  of  Reading,  Pennsylvania. 

William  R.  James,  the  father  of  Benjamin  Frank  James,  was  k  native  of 
Wales,  bom  Dec.  2,  1838,  in  Glamorganshire.  He  was  reared  and  educated 
there,  being  nineteen  years  old  when  he  left  that  land  for  America.  Immedi- 
ately upon  his  arrival  in  this  country  he  settled  in  Schuylkill  county,  Pa.,  where 
he  found  employment  in  the  mines  and  continued  to  engage  in  that  line  of 
work  to  the  end  of  his  days.  For  many  years  he  was  an  operator  on  his  own 
account,  in  1875  leasing  coal  lands  at  Shenandoah  from  the  Philadelphia  & 
Reading  Company,  and  conducting  business  under  the  name  of  the  Cambridge 
Coal  Q)mpany  until  his  death,  in  the  spring  of  1892.  Mr.  James  married 
Elizabeth  Thomas,  nee  Harris,  who  preceded  him  to  the  grave,  dying  in  1890, 
and  they  are  interred  in  the  burial  plot  in  Shenandoah.  His  home  was  at 
Shenandoah  for  seventeen  years,  until  his  death.  Their  family  consisted  of  five 
children:  David  R.,  John  R.,  William  J.,  Benjamin  Frank  (the  subject  of  this 
sketch),  and  Mary,  the  last  named  being  deceased. 

JOHN  HENRY  SHOEMAKER  has  spent  the  greater  part  of  his  life  on 
the  farm  in  West  Perm  township  where  he  ^s  now  residing,  and  which  he 
has  been  operating  successfully  on  his  own  account  for  a  number  of  years. 
He  was  bom  in  that  township  Nov.  10,'  1869,  son  of  Joel  Shoemaker,  and  he 
is  a  ereat-cT-andson  of  Johannes  Shoemaker,  who  established  the  family  in 
VoLn—9 


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738  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

this  country,  coming  from  Germany  and  passing  the  rest  of  his  days  as  a 
farmer  in  Lehigh  county,  Pa.    He  is  buried  in  that  county. 

Jonas  Shoemaker,  son  of  Johannes,  was  bom  in  I^high  county,  in  what 
was  then  the  township  of  Lehigh,  and  settled  in  SchuylkiU  county,  where  he 
became  a  very  prosperous  farmer  and  landowper.  His  holdings  included  five 
very  good  farms,  comprising  between  500  and  600  acres  of  land,  and  he  lived 
on  a  200-acre  tract,  most  of  which  latter  he  cleared.  When  "he  retired  he 
went  to  live  with  his  son  Joel,  giving  up  active  work  about  seven  years  before 
his  death.  He  was  a  man  of  energetic  nature,  and  interested  in  all  things  which 
concerned  the  community,  taking  an  active  part  in  the  work  of  the  Demo- 
cratic party  in  his  locality.  He  was  a  Lutheran  member  qf  Zion's  Church 
in  West  Penn  township,  where  he  and  his  second  wife  are  buried.  He  lived 
to  the  age  of  ninety-three  years.  He  was  twice  married.  By  his  first  wife, 
whose  maiden  name  was  Bachert,  and  who  lived  to  be  over  eighty,  he  had  the 
following  children:  Polly,  bom  Nov.  3,  1819;  Priscilla,  bom  Jan.  4,  1822, 
who  was  married  to  Jacob  Loch  and  had  one  son,  Noah ;  one  child,  bom  Feb. 
22,  1824,  who  died  unnamed;  Joel,  born  Nov.  8,  1825;  Sallie,  bom  Jan.  7, 
1828,  who  died  yoimg;  Mary  Ann,  who  married  William  SchaflFer;  her  twin 
sister,  Barbara,  who  married  Ephraim  Snyder;  Johannes,  bom  Jan.  24,  1830; 
Sallie,  bom  Sept.  13,  1833;  Giedon,  bom  March  28,  1836,  who  married  Levina 
Neifert;  Samuel,  bom  Aug.  26,  1838,  who  married  Mary  Moyer;  a  child, 
bom  July  21,  1841,  who  died  unnamed;  Leah,  bom  April  14,  1843,  married 
to  Noah  Houser;  Elavina,  bom  Jan.  15,  1847,  who  married  Nathan  Miller; 
Benjamin;  and  Susanna,  Mrs.  Simon  Shellhammer.  For  his  second  wife 
Jonas  Shoemaker  married  Mrs.  Lavina  (Kistler)  Kemp,  widow  of  Isaac 
Kemp,  and  to  this  union  came  one  child,  Adam,  bom  Oct.  16,.  1870,  who  died 
at  the  age  of  twenty-four  years. 

Joel  Shoemaker,  son  of  Jonas,  was  bom  Nov.  8,  1825,  in  Lehigh  township, 
and  received  his  education  in  his  native  county.  He  worked  for  his  father 
until  after  his  marriage,  and  his  father  then  gave  him  the  farm  now  occupied 
by  Gottfried  Knoedler,  a  tract  of  eighty  acres  in  West  Penn  township,  which 
he  improved  greatly  during  the  seven  years  he  resided  thereon.  He  cleared 
most  of  the  land,  put  up  a  number  of  outbuildings  and  a  new  house,  and  by 
his  thrifty  management  increased  the  value  of  the  place  very  materially. 
Then  he  removed  to  the  place  in  West  Penn  township  now  occupied  by  his 
son  John,  the  old  Christian  Crouse  farm,  comprising  eighty  acres  of  valuable 
land,  all  of  which  was  cleared  and  under  cultivation.  He  followed  general 
farming  there  until  1901,  and  stayed  with  his  son  John  until  his  death,  in 
1904.  Mr.  Shoemaker  took  some  part  in  the  administration  of  local  affairs, 
serving  as  school  director  and  collector  of  the  school  tax.  He  was  a  Demo- 
crat in  politics  and  a  Lutheran  in  religion,  belonging  to  Zion's  Church,  where 
he  and  his  wife  were  buried.  He  married  Mary  Ann  Neifert,  who  was  bora 
June  4,  1835,  daughter  of  Peter  Neifert,  and  died  at  the  age  of  sixty-seven 
years.  We  have  the  following  record  of  their  family:  Amanda  Matilda, 
bom  May  13,  1857,  is  the  wife  of  Charles  Johnson;  James  A.  was  bom  Oct 
15,  1858;  Lavina  Rebecca,  bom  Oct.  8,  i860,  died  July  22,  1873;  George  Mc- 
Qellan,  bom  Dec.  9,  1862,  is  now  living  in  Kansas ;  John  Henry  was  bom  Nov. 
10,  1869;  Rosie  Cecilia,  bom  Sept.  7,  1871,  died  Sept.  22,  1877;  Clara  Mary, 
bom  Aug.  12,  1878,  married  Theodore  Gerber  and  (second)  Milton  Boyer. 

John  H.  Shoemaker  was  reared  and  educated  in  West  Penn  township. 
He  received  his  early  training  assisting  his  father,  for  whom  he  worked  on 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  739 

the  home  place  until  twenty-four  years  old.  For  a  few  months  afterwards 
he  was  in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company,  M 
the  Palo  Alto  car  shops,  was  next  engaged  as  a  wood-chopper  in  West  Penn 
township  for  a  couple  of  months,  and  then  rented  the  Gideon  Zehner  farm 
for  two  years.  At  the  end  of  that  period  he  returned  to  the  old  homestead 
in  West  Penn  township,  which  he  rented  for  one  year  before  buying  it,  and 
he  is  still  residing  there  and  carrying  on  general  farming.  He,  markets  his 
products  at  Tamaqua.  The  farm  originally  contained  eighty-two  acres,  fifty- 
six  perches,  but  a  small  part  was  sold  to  the  railroad  company,  the  tract  now 
consisting  of  seventy-eight  acres ;  about  seven  acres  are  in  timber.  Mr.  Shoe- 
maker devotes  practically  all  his  time  to  his  agricultural  work,  taking  no  part 
in  public  affairs,  though  he  is  public-spirited  in  his  support  of  all  gcK>d  meas- 
ures. He  is  a  Democrat,  and  a  Lutheran,  belonging  to  Zion's  Church  in  West 
Penn  township. 

At  the  age  of  twenty-three  years  Mr.  Shoemaker  was  married  to  Caroline 
Zehner,  who  was  bom  Aug.  9,  1871,  in  West  Penn  township,  received  her 
education  in  the  public  schools  there,  and  remained  at  home  until  her  marriage. 
Like  her  husband  she  is  a  member  of  Zion's  Lutheran  Church  in  West  Penn 
township,  in  whose  work  she  has  taken  considerable  interest,  having  served 
as  Sunday  school  teacher.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Shoemaker  have  had  four  chil- 
dren: Cora  Ellen,  bom  Aug.  8,  1893,  is  the  wife  of  Lee  Yarbrough^  of 
Tamaqua,  Pa.,  and  they  have  two  children,  Vera  Leoda  (bom  Dec.  25,  1912) 
and  Elda  Caroline  (bom  Dec.  i,  1914) ;  Carrie  Irene,  bom  Jan.  18,  1895, 
married  James  Houser,  of  Tamaqua,  Pa.,  and  they  have  one  child,  John 
Amandus  (bom  Dec.  9,  1914)  ;  Harold  Adam,  bom  March  11,  1896,  is  attend- 
ing the  Keystone  State  Normal  School  at  Kutztown,  Pa.,  ,a  member  of  the 
class  of  1915;  Nora  Amelia  was  bom  Sept.  5,  1907. 

Johannes  Zehner,  grandfather  of  Mrs.  John  H.  Shoemaker,  was  born  in 
West  Penn  township,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  died  when  over  eighty- 
four  years  old.  During  the  summer  season  he  engaged  in  farming,  operating 
and  owning  the  place  where  Mr.  George  yB.  Adam  now  resides,  and  in  the 
'winter  time  followed  his  trade  of  cooper,  making  barrels,  etc.,  continuing 
both  lines  throughout  his  active  years.  He  was  a  Democrat  and  served  as 
supervisor  of  his  township.  His  religious  connection  was  with  the  Lutheran 
congregation  of  Zion's  Church,  but  he  was  not  specially  active  in  its  work. 
He  and  his  wife,  Christina  (Steigerwalt),  daughter  of  Joseph  Steigerwalt, 
are  buried  at  Zion's  Church.  They  had  the  following  children :  William,  who 
married  Polly  Houser;  Moses,  who  married  a  Miss  Schwartz;  Hettie,  wife 
of  David  Halderman;  Gideon,  who  married  Sarah  Houser;  and  John  S.,  who 
married  Rebecca  Beiyiighoflf. 

Gideon  Zehner,  son  of  Johannes,  was  bom  April  20,  1832,  in  West  Penn 
township,  where  he  was  reared  and  educated.  He  was  trained  to  farming, 
working  for  his  father  until  after  his  marriage,  but  he  also  learned  the  trades  of 
stonemason  and  plasterer  and  later  butchenng,  always  doing  his  own  work  in 
that  line.  Imipediately  after  his  marriage  he  bought  the  farm  now  owned  by 
his  son  Lewis  A.  Zehner,  in  West  Penn  township,  and  did  most  of  the  clearing 
of  that  tract,  put  up  new  buildings  there,  and  for  many  years  carried  on  both 
farming  and  butchering,  his  children  operating  the  farm,  while  he  gave  most 
of  his  attention  to  the  latter  line.  He  carried  his  meats  to  Tamaqua,  Coal- 
dale  and  Lansford  to  market.  During  the  latter  part  of  his  life  he  devoted 
himself  entirely  to  agricultural  work.    In  the  pursuit  of  his  various  interests 


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740  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

he  became  very  well  known  in  his  section  of  Schuylkill  county.  For  a  number 
of  years  he  taueht  singing  school,  and  he  was  an  esteemed  member  of  Zion's 
Lutheran  Church  in  West  Penn  township.  He  and  his  wife  are  buried  at  that 
church.  In  politics  he  was  a  Democrat.  Mr.  Zehner  married  Sarah  Houser, 
who  was  bom  Sept.  i6,  1832,  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Elizabeth  (Wertman) 
Houser,  and  died  Jan.  11,  i8g2.  Mr.  Zehner  survived  her  a  number  of  years, 
passing  away  May  20,  1905.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children : 
Lewis  Albert,  who  now  occupies  the  home  farm  in  West  Penn  township,  mar- 
ried Amelia  Tyson ;  Mary  Elizabeth  is  the  wife  of  David  Steigerwalt,  of  West 
Penn  township ;  Louisa  died  young ;  Elias  died  young ;  Emma  Jeannetta  is  the 
wife  of  Charles  Stout,  of  Summit  Hill,  Carbon  Co.,  Pa.;  Charles,  deceased, 
married  Emma  Gerber,  who  resides  in  West  Penn  township ;  Caroline  is  the 
wife  of  John  Henry  Shoemaker. 

Daniel  Houser,  father  of  Mrs.  Sarah  (Houser)  Zehner,  was  a  blacksmith 
by  trade  and  also  followed  farming.  He  first  owned  a  farm  in  West  Penn 
township,  now  the  property  of  Henry  Baer,  and  after  selling  this  place  lived 
on  the  tract  now  occupied  by  Fred  Schaeffer.  Later  he  bought  the  farm  now 
owned  by  Frank  Steieerwalt,  and  besides  lookin|^  after  its  cultivation  had  a 
blacksmith  shop  and  followed  his  trade  there.  He  died  on  that  place.  His 
wife,  Elizabeth  (Wertman),  passed  away  at  the  age  of  eighty-one  years,  and 
they  are  buried  at  Zion's  Church  in  West  Penn  township.  Mr.  Houser  was  a 
member  of  the  Reformed  congregation  there,  and  a  Democrat  in  political  sen- 
timent. Mr.  and  Mrs.  Houser  had  the  following  children :  Aaron,  who  mar- 
ried Amanda  Kramer,  lives  in  West  Penn  township;  William^  now  deceased, 
was  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war ;  Gideon  died  young ;  Sarah  married  Gideon  Zeh- 
ner ;  Priscilla  is  the  widow  of  Stephen  Steigerwalt,  and  now  resides  at  Andreas, 
this  county;  Esther  married  Jacob  Christman,  and  both  are  deceased;  Betsy, 
widow  of  Levi  Zehner,  lives  at  Tamaqua,  Schuylkill  county ;  Kate,  deceased, 
was  the  wife  of  Charles  Woomer,  of  Summit  Hill,  Carbon  Co.,  Pa. ;  one  son 
died  young. 

LEWIS  ALBERT  ZEHNER  is  cultivating  the  old  Zehner  homestead  in 
West  Penn  township,  and  by  his  thrift  and  up-to-date  management  of  that 
property  is  showing  himself  a  worthy  member  of  a  family  whose  name  has 
long  been  synon)rmous  with  industry  and  the  other  substantial  qualities  which 
constitute  good  citizenship.  He  was  born  on  his  present  farm  June  30,  i860, 
son  of  Gideon  Zehner  and  grandson  of  Johannes  Zehner. 

Johannes  Zehner  was  bom  in  West  Penn  township,  Schuylkill  county,  where 
he  died  when  over  eighty-four  years  old.  During  the  summer  season  he  en- 
gaged in  farming,  operating  and  owning  the  place  where  George  B.  Adam  now 
resides,  and  in  the  winter  time  followed  his  trade  of  cooper,  making  barrels, 
etc.,  continuing  both  lines  throughout  his  active  years.  He  was  a  Democrat 
and  served  as  supervisor  of  his  township.  His  religious  connection  was  with 
the  Lutheran  congregation  of  Zion*s  Church,  but  he  was  not  specially  active 
in  its  work.  He  and  his  wife,  Christina  (Steigerwalt),  daughter  of  Joseph 
Steigerwalt,  are  buried  at  Zion's  Church.  They  had  the  following  children: 
Wilnam,  who  married  Polly  Houser ;  Moses,  who  married  a  Miss  Schwartz ; 
Hettie,  wife  of  Daniel  Halderman ;  Gideon,  who  married  Sarah  Houser ;  and 
John  S.,  who  married  Rebecca  Bennighoff. 

Gideon  Zehner,  son  of  Johannes,  was  bom  April  20,  1832,  in  West  Penn 
township,  where  he  was  reared  and  educated.    He  was  trained  to  farming, 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  741 

working  for  his  father  until  after  his  marriage,  but  he  also  learned  the  trades 
of  stonemason  and  plasterer  and  later  butchering,  always  doing  his  own  work 
in  that  line.  Immediately  after  his  marriage  he  bought  the  farm  now  owned 
by  his  son  Lewis  A.  in  West  Penn  township,  and  did  most  of  the  clearing  of 
that  tract,  put  up  new  buildings  there,  and  for  many  years  carried  on  both 
farming  and  butchering,  his  children  operating  the  farm,  while  he  gave  most 
of  his  attention  to  the  latter  line.  He  carried  his  meats  to  Tamaqua,  Coaldale 
and  Lansford  to  market.  During  the  latter  part  of  his  life  he  devoted  himself 
entirely  to  agricultural  work.  In  the  pursuit  of  his  various  interests  he  became 
very  well  known  in  his  section  of  Schuylkill  county.  For  a  number  of  years 
he  taught  singing  school,  and  he  was  an  esteemed  member  of  Zion*s  Lutheran 
Church  in  West  Penn  township.  He  and  his  wife  are  both  buried  at  that 
church.  In  politics  he  was  a  Democrat.  Mr.  Zehner  married  Sarah  Houser, 
who  was  born  Sept.  i6,  1832,  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Elizabeth  (Wertman) 
Houser,  and  died  Jan.  11,  1892.  Mr.  Zehner  survived  her  a  number  of  years, 
passing  away  May  20,  1905.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children : 
Lewis  Albert ;  Mary  Elizabeth,  wife  of  David  Steigerwalt,  of  Weist  Penn  town- 
ship; Louisa,  who  died  young;  Elias,  deceased  when  young;  Emma  Jeannetta, 
the  wife  of  Charles  Stout,  of  Summit  Hill,  Carbon  Co.,  Pa. ;  Charles,  deceased, 
who  married  Emma  Gerber  (she  resides  in  West  Penn  township)  ;  and  Caro- 
line, wife  of  John  Henry  Shoeiiiaker. 

Daniel  Houser,  father  of  Mrs.  Sarah  (Houser)  Zehner,  was  a  blacksmith 
by  trade  and  also  followed  farming.  He  first  owned  a  farm  in  West  Penn 
township,  now  the  property  of  Henry  Baer,  and  after  selling  this  place  lived 
on  the  tract  now  occupied  bv  Fred  Schaeffer.  Later  he  bought  the  farm  now 
owned  by  Frank  Steigerwalt,  and  besides  looking  after  its  cultivation  had  a 
blacksmith  shop  and  followed  his  trade  there.  He  died  on  that  place  in  1887. 
His  wife,  Elizabeth  (Wertman),  passed  away  at  the  age  of  eighty-one  years, 
and  they  are  buried  at  Zion's  Church  in  West  Penn  township.  Mr.  Houser 
was  a  manber  of  the  Reformed  cdngregation  there,  and  a  Democrat  in  political 
sentiment.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Houser  had  the \ following  children:  Aaron,  who 
married  Amanda  Kramer,  lives  in  West  Penn  township;  William,  now  de- 
ceased, was  a  soldier  in  the  Civil  war;  Gideon  died  young;  Sarah  married 
Gideon  Zehner ;  Priscilla  is  the  widow  of  Stephen  Steigerwalt,  and  now  resides 
at  Andreas,  this  county;  Esther  married  Jacob  Christman,  and  both  are  de- 
ceased; Betsy,  widow  of  Levi  Zehner,  lives  at  Tamaqua,  Schuylkill  county; 
Kate,  deceased,  was  the  wife  of  Charles  Woomer,  of  Summit  Hill,  Carbon 
Co.,  Pa. ;  one  son  died  young. 

Lewis  A.  Zehner  was  trained  to  farm  wqfrk  under  the  able  direction  of  his 
father,  with  whom  he  worked  until  he  reached  the  age  of  twenty-eight  years. 
After  leaving  the  home  place  he  worked  four  years  for  his  father  on  the  other 
farm  which  the  latter  owned,  and  th^n  returned  to  the  homestead,  which  he 
bought,  and  where  he  has  since  been  engaged  in  general  agriculture.  His 
parents  continued  to  reside  there  until  they  died.  Mr.  Zehner  markets  his 
farm  products  at  Tamaqua  and  Coaldale.  He  supports  the  Democratic  party 
and  is  a  Lutheran  in  religion,  belinging  to  Zion's  Church  in  West  Penn  town- 
ship. Socially  he  is  a  member  of  Washington  Camp  No.  132,  at  Moyers  (for- 
merly Schwartz's),  in  the  same  township.  He  was  married,  at  the  age  of 
twenty-seven  years,  to  Amelia  R.  Tyson,  who  was  bom  Sept.  15,  1865,  at 
Tamaqua,  this  county,  where  she  first  attended  school,  living  there  until  ten 
years  old.     She  then  removed  with  her  parents  to  West  Penn  township  and 


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742  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  ^ 

remained  home  up  to  the  time  of  her  marriage.  She  is  a  member  of  Zion's 
Lutheran  Church  and  has  always  been  interested  in  its  welfare,  formerly 
taking  an  active  part  in  its  work  as  a  teacher  in  the  Sunday  school.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Zehner  have  one  child,  Ellen  Irene,  bom  Aug.  i,  1888,  now  the  wife 
of  Elmer  Zehner,  who  was  bom  Nov.  r  1888,  son  of  Thomas  Zehner.  He  now 
cultivates  his  father's  farm.  Three  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Elmer  Zehner:  Harry  Elmer,  Nov.  12,  1909;  Cora  Ellen,  Sept.  24,  1913;  and 
Mary  Amelia,  Jan.  25,  1915. 

Jesse  Tyson,  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Lewis  A.  Zehner,  was  born  in  Lehigh 
county  and  lived  to  the  age  of  eighty  years,  dying  in  West  Penn  township, 
Schuylkill  county.  From  his  native  county  he  first  moved  to  the  neighborhood 
of  Allemaengel  in  Albany  township,  Berks  county,  later  settling  in  West  Penn 
township,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  spent  the  remainder  of  his  days.  By 
occupation  he  was  a  farmer.  Politically  he  was  a  Republican,  and  in  religion 
a  Lutheran,  belonging  to  the  Windsor  Castle  Church  in  Berks  county,  where 
he  and  his  wife,  Maria  (Rothermel),  are  buried.  They  had  the  following 
children:  Jesse,  who  married  Anna  Kleckner;  Joseph;  Henry;  Hannah,  wife 
of  William  Miller;  Maria,  wife  of  Frank  Heisler;  Sarah,  wife  of  Nathan 
Weissner;  and  Rebecca,  wife  of  Francis  Akerman. 

Henry  Tyson,  son  of  Jesse,  was  bom  May  29,  1826,  in  Allemaengel,  Berks 
county,  and  there  spent  his  early  life,  receiving  his  education  in  the  local  schools. 
In  his  youth  he  worked  around  among  farmers  and  learned  the  blacksmith's 
trade  with  Mr.  Franklin  in  West  Brunswick  township,  Schuylkill  county.  He 
followed  his  trade  at  different  places  until  his  removal  to  Tamaqua,  where  he 
worked  for  several  employers  until  he  obtained  a  position  with  Carter  &  Allen, 
with  whom  he  remained  for  a  period  of  twenty-three  years.  He  then  settled 
in  West  Penn  township,  on  a  farm  of  eighty  acres,  which  he  purchased,  and 
though  he  sold  the  farm  after  he  had  been  living  on  it  for  fifteen  years  he 
continued  to  reside  upon  it  as  caretaker  for  some  time  afterwards.  Meantime 
he  worked  for  other  farmers  also.  Eventually  he  removed  to  the  Elsie  Zehner 
farm,  where  he  died  June  22,  1909.  He  is  buried  at  Zion's  Church  in  West 
Penn  township.  Mr.  Tyson  was  a  prominent  member  of  the  Lutheran  con- 
gregation of  that  church,  which  he  served  officially  as  deacon  and  he  was  also 
deeply  interested  in  the  Sunday  school,  in  which  he  acted  as  teacher.  Politi- 
cally he  was  identified  with  the  Republican  party,  and  he  held  membership 
in  Tamaqua  Council  of  the  Jr.  O.  U.  A.  M. 

In  West  Bmnswick  township  Mr.  Tyson  married  Maria  Elizabeth  Mohl, 
and  she  survives  him,  now  living  with  her  daughter  Mrs.  Lewis  A.  Zehner. 
The  following  children  were  born  to  their  marriage :  George  W.,  now  a  resi- 
dent of  Newark,  N.  J.,  married  Amanda  Seiberling;  Frank  L.,  of  Weatherly, 
Pa.,  married  Rose  Holtshafer,  and  they  have  children,  Harry  Elmer,  Minnie 
May,  Morris  Frederick,  Helen  Catherine,  Dora  Alice,  Claude  Irwin,  George 
Alfred,  Roy  Franklin,  Charles  and  Ada  Maria;  Harry  F.,  of  Chicago,  111.,  is 
married  to  Emma  Bums;  Amelia  R.  is  Mrs.  Lewis  A.  Zehner;  William  A., 
of  Normal,  married  Agnes  Hartung,  and  their  children  are  Edgar  William, 
Mamie  Katie,  Lula  Maria,  Claude  Irwin,  Hilda  Anna  and  Earl  David  (twins) 
and  Arline ;  Charles  I.,  who  is  unmarried,  lives  with  his  sister  Mrs.  Zehner. 

Michael  Mohl,  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Tyson,  was  a  lifelong  farmer,  living  in 
West  Bmnswick  township,  where  he  owned  a  large  and  valuable  property. 
He  was  a  Reformed  member  of  Zion's  Church  (the  old  Red  Church)  in  that 
township,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  both  buried  there.     Politically  he  was  a 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  743 

Democrat     His  children  were:  Henry,  Benjamin,  John,  Michael,  Hannah, 
Sarah  and  Rebecca. 

Michael  Mohl,  son  of  Michael,  was  bom  in  West  Brunswick  township,  and 
died  at  the  age  of  seventy-three  years.  He  was  a  farmer  all  his  life,  owning 
ninety  acres  of  good  land.  Like  his  father  he  belonged  to  the  Lutheran  con- 
gregation of  the  old  Red  Church  in  West  Brunswick  township,  and  he  was  a 
Republican  in  his  political  conviction.  He  married  Hannah  Eveland,  daughter 
of  Daniel  and  Catherine  (Medlar)  Eveland,  and  she,  too,  passed  away  at  the 
age  of  seventy-three  years.  They  are  buried  at  the  old  Red  Church.  They 
were  the  parents  of  eight  children,  namely :  Daniel  married  Rebecca  Walborn ; 
Michael  married  Annie  Ketner ;  Henry  died  young ;  Hannah  married  Washing- 
ton Gross ;  Sarah  married  William  Grief ;  Catherine  married  John  Fraunf elder ; 
Maria  Elizabeth  is  Mrs.  Tyson ;  Amelia  married  Peter  Walborn. 

JOSEPH  SHOENER,  who  now  lives  retired  at  McKeansburg,  spent  his 
active  years  as  a  prosperous  farmer  in  East  Brunswick  township.  Industrious 
and  successful,  able  in  the  management  of  business  affairs  and  trustworthy  in 
all  his  transactions,  he  enjoys  the  high  standing  characteristic  of  the  Shoeners, 
than  whom  no  family  in  southern  Schuylkill  county  is  more  respected. 

Born  Jan.  14,  1842,  in  West  Brunswick  township,  this  county,  he  is  a  son 
of  Henry  Shoener  and  grandson  of  John  Shoener,  who  was  a  farmer  in  what 
is  now  West  Brunswick  township,  at  that  time  a  part  of  Berks  county.  Pa. 
He  was  bom  about  1767,  settled  on  a  large  farm  that  had  been  cleared  by  his 
wife's  father,  built  a  log  house  and  barn/and  carried  on  farming  the  greater 
part  of  his  life.  He  was  a  highly  respected  man  in  his  neighborhood,  died 
upon  his  farm,  and  is  buried  with  his  wife  in  the  Reformed  cemetery  at  Orwigs- 
burg.  He  had  a  family  of  about  twelve  children,  and  we  have  record  of  George, 
Henry,  John,  Daniel,  Solomon,  William,  Jacob,  Anna  and  Susanna.  Politically 
he  was  a  Democrat,  and  his  religious  connection  was  with  the  Reformed 
Church. 

Henry  Shoener,  son  of  John,  above,  was  bom  in  West  Brunswick  town- 
ship June  23,  1813,  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  that  township,  and 
stayed  on  his  father's  farm  until  he  moved  to  Orwigsburg,  about  1874.  He 
had  a  farm  of  over  two  hundred  acres,  part  of  which  he  cleared,  and  was  a 
well  known  man  in  his  day.  His  wife,  Christiana  (Sheip),  was  bom  Dec. 
31,  1818,  and  died  Oct.  6,  1893.  Her  father,  Peter  Sheip,  bom  in  1784,  died 
Nov.  25,  1845,  ^g^<i  sixty-one  years.  Mr.  Shoener  died  Jan.  20,  i8qo,  and 
he  and  his  wife  are  buried  in  the  Reformed  cemetery  at  Orwigsburg.  He  was 
a  member  of  the  Reformed  Church  and  was  a  Democrat  in  politics.  Mr. 
and  Mrs.  Shoener  had  the  following  children:  Lewis  married  Sarah  Koch,  and 
both  are  deceased;  Joseph  is  mentioned  below;  Caroline,  deceased,  married 
Morgan  Koch,  who  resides  in  McKeansburg,  Pa.;  Edward  is  a  resident  of 
Orwigsburg;  William  married  Diana  Sheip;  John  is  deceased;  Charles,  de- 
ceased, married  Anna  Hummel,  who  resides  at  Orwigsburg;  Clara  married 
Charles  Cook;  Mary  married  James  Dreher;  Daniel  married  Alice  Dieffen- 
derfer;  Albert,  who  married  Anna  Jenkins,  lives  at  Orwigsburg;  Thomas 
married  Emma  Faust. 

Joseph  Shoener  began  his  education  in  the  pay  schools  conducted  in  West 
Brunswick  township  during  his  boyhood,  and  later  attended  public  school  in 
the  home  district.  From  an  early  age  he  assisted  his  father  with  the  work 
on  the  home  farm.    When  eighteen  years  old  he  commenced  to  leam  the  trade 


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744  •  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

of  shoemaker,  but  after  serving  nine  months  found  he  did  not  like  the  work 
well  enough  to  follow  it,  and  gave  it  up.  Early  in  the  Civil  war  he  entered  the 
Union  Army,  enlisting  Oct.  25,  1862,  at  Orwigsburg,  in  the  Pennsylvania  mili- 
tia, Company  A,  173d  Regiment,  under  Capt.  Cyrus  Sheetz,  for  nine  months. 
He  was  discharged  Aug.  17,  1863,  ^it  Camp  Curtin,  Harrisburg,  and  on  Feb. 
23,  1864,  reenlisted,  for  three  years  or  during  the  war,  joining  Company  I, 
40th  Pennsylvania  Veteran  Volunteer  Infantry,  in  which  he  served  under  three 
captains,  John  R.  Porter,  Benjamin  Shook  and  Francis  D.  Koch.  Mr.  Shoener 
was  discharged  July  17,  1865,  near  Alexandria,  Va.,  and  was  mustered  out  at 
Harrisburg,  with  a  fine  record,  having^  participated  in  the  engagements  of 
Newbem,  Bull  Run  (second),  ChantilTy,  South  Mountain,  Antietam,  Fred- 
ericksburg, Blue  Springs,  Campbell  Station,  Knoxville  (siege),  Wilderness, 
Spottsylvania,  North  Anna  River,  Tolopotomy,  Bethesda  Church,  Cold  Har- 
bor, Petersburg,  Weldon  Railroad,  Poplar  Spring  Church,  Boydton  Plank 
Road  and  the  assault  on  Petersburg. 

Returning  from  the  army  Mr.  Shoener  spent  the  next  year  working  in  the 
coal  mines  of  Lost  Creek,  and  then  went  to  farming  in  East  Brunswick  town- 
ship on  a  130-acre  tract  which  he  bought  in  1867  and  on  which  he  remained 
thirty  years.  That  farm  is  now  the  property  of  his  son  John.  Joseph  Shoener 
then  bought  the  farm  now  owned  by  his  son  Charles,  a  tract  of  forty  acres  in 
East  Brunswick  township,  remaining  there  until  April  28,  1904.  He  improved 
both  properties,  putting  up  new  buildings  and  developing  the  land  intelligently, 
and  retired  in  1910,  after  a  useful  life,  moving  to  McKeansburg.  He  still  owns 
400  acres  of  timberland  on  the  Second  mountain. 

Mr.  Shoener  married  Mary  Paul,  who  was  bom  Feb.  7,  1845,  ^  daughter 
of  Daniel  and  Kate  (Yeager)  Paul,  and  they  had  the  following  children: 
George,  Maggie,  Lizzie  and  Robert  died  young;  John  married  Bessie  Aker; 
Charles  married  Cora  Bachman;  Fred  married  Kate  Wagner.  The  mother 
died  June  13,  1901,  and  is  buried  in  the  Steigerwalt  cemetery.  On  Aug.  i, 
1903,  Mr.  Shoener  married  (second)  Emma  Kunkel,  who  was  bom  Dec.  31, 
1864,  daughter  of  John  and  Mary  (Long)  Kunkel,  and  three  children  have 
been  bom  to  this  union:  Mary  Christiann,  July  7,  1904;  Naomi  Pearl,  Dec.  11, 
1906;  Joseph  Edward,  April  30,  1909.  They  are  all  attending  school.  Mr. 
Shoener  has  been  interested  in  local  politics  as  a  Republican,  and  has  served 
his  fellow  citizens  in  the  offices  of  school  director  and  supervisor.  He  is  a 
zealous  member  of  the  Church  of  God  at  Steigerwalt.  Mrs.  Shoener  belongs 
to  the  Frieden's  Church  at  New  Ringgold. 

Georg  Kunkel,  the  founder  of  a  pioneer  family  of  Albany  township,  Berks 
county,  lived  near  Wessnersville,  on  land  now  occupied  by  one  of  his  descend- 
ants, Nathan  Kunkel.  Georg  Kunkel  (also  spelled  Kunckell  and  Kungel), 
a  native  of  Germany,  located  in  Albany  township  some  time  prior  to  1754, 
and  it  appears  that  he  reared  a  large  family.  In  Rupp's  History  of  Berks 
county  (1886),  his  name  app>ears  on  the  list  of  taxables  of  1756  as  "George 
Kunckell."  In  1759,  according  to  Montgomery's  History  of  Berks  County 
(1886),  his  name  is  listed  as  George  Kungel;  in  the  latter  year  he  paid  a  tax 
of  six  pounds.  At  the  Kunkel  homestead  is  an  old  grandfather's  clock  that 
bears  the  date  of  1772.  It  was  brought  into  this  house  at  the  same  time  the 
house  was  being  built,  and  is  the  workmanship  of  George  Miller,  of  German- 
town.  It  has  kept  good  time  all  these  years.  On  the  brass  face  appear  the 
letters  "I.  G.  K."  The  Kunkel  tract  has  been  in  the  family  name  since  1754. 
Georg  Kunkel  was  a  farmer,  and  his  farm  has  been  divided  and  sub-divided 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  745 

since  his  time.  His  land  at  one  time  included  all  the  upper  end  of  Stony  Run. 
He  is  buried  at  Wessnersville.    His  children  were  George  and  Peter. 

Peter  Kunkel,  son  of  Georg,  bom  Dec.  20,  1774,  in  Albany  township, 
died  Oct.  28,  1830.  After  his  marriage  he  moved  to  Ljmn  township,  Lehigh 
county,  where  he  engaged  in  farming,  and  also  operated  a  distillery  on  his 
farm.  Later  he  lived  near  Wessnersville,  where  he  owned  a  tract  of  275 
acres,  which  is  now  owned  by  a  descendant,  Charles  Kunkel.  In  1797  Peter 
Kunkel  married  Maria  Magdalena  Rausch,  bom  Nov.  lo,  ^778,  died  April 
12,  1846.  They  had  fourteen  children,  eleven  of  whom  survived  their  parents 
(sixteen  grandchildren  also  surviving).  Among  these  were:  Daniel,  David, 
Andraes,  Benjamin,  Joseph  (married  Catharine  Snyder  and  had  twelve  chil- 
dren), Peter,  Polly  (married  Jacob  Elbert),  Catharine  (married  John  Diet- 
rich) and  Sophia. 

Daniel  Kunkel,  son  of  Peter,  was  bom  in  Albany  township,  Berks  county, 
March  2,  1798,  and  died  Oct.  26,  1863.  He  was  a  farmer,  owning  two  tracts, 
one  of  two  hundred  acres,  the  other  of  sixty.  He  owned  and  lived  on  the 
farm  which  later  became  the  property  of  his  son  Jacob,  who  sold  it  to  Henry 
Bauscher,  his  brother-in-law,  in  1870,  for  $10,000.  It  comprises  127  acres 
of  excellent  land,  situated  in  the  potato  belt,  and  is  now  tenanted  and  culti- 
vated by  Daniel  Bauscher,  son  of  Henry.  The  present  bam  on  the  place  was 
built  by  Daniel  Kunkel.  He  married  in  1821  Maria  Magdalena  Zimmerman, 
bom  Feb.  27,  1797,  died  July  14,  1859,  and  they  are  both  buried  in  the 
Frieden's  Church  at  Wessnersville.  They  had  a  large  family,  thirteen  chil- 
dren, among  whom  were:  A  daughter  who  married  Daniel  Brobst;  Catharine, 
who  married  Reuben  A.  Dietrich;  Mary,  who  married  a  Mr.  Derr;  Benjamin, 
who  married  Sarah  Hartman ;  John,  who  lived  and  died  at  McKeansburg, 
Pa.;  Jacob,  bom  in  1841,  died  in  1900;  and  Sarah,  who  married  Henry 
Bauscher. 

John  Kunkel,  son  of  Daniel,  was  bom  in  1823  in  Albany  township,  Berks 
xounty,  and  received  his  education  there.  He  worked  on  his  father's  farm 
until  1850,  when  he  left  Albany  township  and  removed  to  Bensinger's  Valley, 
in  East  Bmnswick  township,  Schuylkill  county,  locating  at  what  is  known 
locally  as  Schmaltzdale,  in  the  vicinity  of  McKeansburg.  There  he  bought 
120  acres  of  land,  upon  which  he  remained  the  rest  of  his  days,  engaged  in 
general  farming  and  raising  of  tmck,  which  he  sold  himself,  having  a  route 
to  Middleport,  this  county.  He  married  Mary  Long,  daughter  of  Christopher 
Long,  a  native  of  Albany  township,  Berks  county,  and  she  survived  him  many 
years,  his  death  occurring  Feb.  27,  1875,  when  he  was  fifty-two  years  old, 
hers  on  April  15,  1901,  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven  years.  They  are  buried 
in  the  cemetery  of  tfie  Frieden's  German  Lutheran  Church  at  New  Ringgold, 
to  which  both  belonged.  Mr.  Kunkel  was  one  of  its  prominent  members,  fill- 
ing all  the  church  offices.  Politically  he  was  a  Democrat.  The  following  chil- 
dren were  bom  to  him  and  his  wife:  Sarah  married  Samuel  Bolich,  who  is 
deceased,  and  she  Uves  in  Albany  township;  Jonas  married  Lavina  Trexler; 
William  married  Mary  Nester;  Mandus  married  Lena  Neiswender  and  they 
reside  in  Nebraska;  Mary  died  young';  Levina  died  young;  Lewis  married 
Caroline  Leiby,  and  both  are  deceased;  Henry  (deceased)  married  Ella  Dun- 
dore,  who  survives  him  and  is  living  at  Springmont,  Berks  county;  John, 
deceased,  married  Lena  Merkel,  of  Orwigsburg,  Pa.;  Daniel  died  unmarried; 
Emma  married  Joseph  Shoener,  of  McKeansburg. 


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746  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

NATHAN  EVANS,  late  of  Potts ville,  was  one  of  the  most  progressive 
men  of  the  borough  in  his  generation.  The  various  enterprises  to  which  he 
devoted  his  energies  were  typical  of  the  man,  whose  alert  mind  and  keen 
foresight  were  substantial  factors  in  the  development  of  his  adopted  town. 
He  contributed  his  full  share  towards  the  work  of  progress  in  his  day,  and 
the  history  of  his  career  forms  part  of  the  history  of  the  locality. 

The  Evans  family  has  been  established  in  eastern  Pennsylvania  for  over 
a  century.  John  Evans,  a  native  of  Wales,  came  to  America  when  a  young 
man,  and  settled  in  the  Conestoga  valley,  in  Lancaster  county,  Pa.,  where  he 
owned  a  large  tract  of  land  and  followed  agricultural  pursuits.  He  died  Aug. 
12,  1813,  when  comparatively  a  young  man.  On  April  9,  1799,  he  married 
Margaret  Jones,  who  was  bom  June  28,  1776,  and  survived  him  a  number  of 
years,  dying  Sept.  24,  1826.  She  was  a  member  of  the  Jones  family,  well 
known  in  the  city  of  Reading  and  elsewhere  in  Berks  county.  She  remarried 
after  Mr.  Evans's  death,  becoming  the  wife  of  John  T.  Bechtel.  Six  children 
were  bom  to  her  union  with  Mr.  Evans,  namely:  Reese,  John  C,  Nathan, 
George,  David,  and  Ann  (who  died  young). 

Nathan  Evans,  son  of  John,  was  born  in  1807  in  Conestoga  Valley,  Lan- 
caster Co.,  Pa.  When  a  young  man  he  became  employed  as  a  clerk  at  the 
Joanna  Furnace  in  Berks  county,  and  when  about  twenty-one  years  old  he 
came  to  Pottsville,  Schuyfkill  county,  with  which  place  he  was  identified  the 
remainder  of  his  life.  Here  he  was  engaged  in  the  shipping  of  coal,  in  which 
line  he  was  a  pioneer  in  this  section,  and  he  had  a  line  of  canalboats  occupied 
with  his  trade.  Later  he  and  Samuel  Silliman  were  associated  in  coal  opera- 
tions, having  a  colliery  at  what  was  known  as  Crow  Hollow,  in  ScThuylkill 
county.  T^ey  did  a  successful  business,  and  Mr.  Evans  continued  his  con- 
nection therewith  for  several  years.  In  company  with  John  Ruch  he  built 
a  mill  at  what  is  now  the  comer  of  Norwegian  and  Railroad  streets,  Potts- 
ville, the  first  steam  flourmill  to  be  constructed  in  this  locality.  They  were 
engaged  in  its  operation  for  many  years,  Mr.  Evans  retiring  when  he  with- 
drew from  this  business.  He  passed  his  last  years  in  the  enjoyment  of  well 
earned  leisure,  dying  in  1884,  and  is  buried  in  the  Charles  Baber  cemetery. 
He  was  a  member  of  Bloomsburg  Lodge,  F.  &  A.  M.,  of  Pottsville,  and  highly 
respected  among  his  brother  Masons,  as  he  was  wherever  known. 

Mr.  Evans  married  Ann  B.  Barde,  daughter  of  Samuel  Barde,  of  Birds- 
boro,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  and  she  lived  to  her  ninety-fourth  year,  passing  away 
in  1894.  Nine  children  were  bom  to  this  union:  Sarah,  who  died  young; 
Louisa  B. ;  George ;  Anna,  deceased ;  Charles  B. ;  Mary,  deceased,  who  was  the 
wife  of  Lewis  P.  Garrigus ;  Clement,  deceased ;  Annie  S. ;  and  Howard,  of 
Colorado.  The  daughters  Louise  and  Annie,  and  son  Charles  B.,  continue 
to  occupy  the  old  home  at  No.  1313  West  Norwegian  street,  Pottsville.  The 
family  are  members  of  the  Episcopal  Church. 

Charles  B.  Evans,  son  of  Nathan,  was  bom  at  Pottsville  March  17,  183Q. 
He  served  in  the  Union  army  throughout  the  Civil  war,  enlisting  April  17, 
1861,  with  the  "First  Defenders,"  and  received  his  honorable  discharge  in 
July,  1865.  He  became  a  private  in  the  Washington  Artillerists,  April  18, 
1861 ;  was  made  corporal  of  Company  G,  48th  Pennsylvania  Veteran  Volun- 
teer Infantry,  Aug.  20,  1861 ;  sergeant  of  same  command,  1862,  serving  as 
such  until  1865.  At  the  second  battle  of  Bull  Run  he  was  wounded,  the  bullet 
passing  through  the  calf  of  his  left  leg.  He  is  an  honored  member  of  Gowen 
Post,  No.  23,  G.  A.  R.,  and  of  the  Union  Veteran  Legion.    After  the  war  Mr. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  747 

Evans  returned  to  Pottsville,  where  he  was  engaged  in  the  lumber  business 
for  many  years,  at  present  leading  a  retired  life.  He  and  his  sisters  are  among 
thfe  most  highly  esteemed  residents  of  Pottsville.  [Charles  B.  Evans  died  in 
December,  191 5.] 

ALLEN  JOSEPH  DEIBERT  is  engaged  in  the  cultivation  of  valuable 
farm  land  at  Orwigsburg  which  has  been  owned  in  his  family  for  three  gen- 
erations, during  which  time  the  Deiberts  have  filled  a  place  among  the  most 
substantial  and  respected  citizens  of  this  section  of  Schuylkill  county.  Honest, 
industrious  and  capable,  they  have  won  the  esteem  of  their  neighbors  in  every 
relation  of  life  by  sincere  effort,  and  deserve  the  high  standing  they  enjoy. 
Allen  J.  Deibert  is  a  son  of  Nathan  Deibert  and  grandson  of  Joseph  Deibert. 

Joseph  Deibert,  the  grandfather,  bom  Nov.  5,  1810,  was  a  prosperous 
farmer  in  the  vicinity  of -Orwigsburg,  owning  two  tracts  of  land,  about  two 
hundred  acres  in  all,  much  of  which  was  cleared  by  his  own  labor.  He  lived 
on  the  place  now  owned  by  Jacob  Moyer,  and  died  there  Feb.  22,  1895.  ^is 
wife,  Elizabeth  Sheipe,  born  April  7,  1816,  died  May  31,  1896,  and  they  are 
buried  in  the  cemetery  of  St.  Paul's  Lutheran  Church  at  Orwigsburg.  Joseph 
Deibert  was  a  faithful  member  of  that  church,  which  many  of  his  descendants 
have  also  attended  and  supported.  Politically  he  was  a  Democrat.  To  Joseph 
and  Elizabeth  (Sheipe)  Deibert  were  bom  the  following  children:  Diana, 
who  married  William  Freed,  of  Orwigsburg,  Pa. ;  Henry ;  Charles,  who  mar- 
ried Mary  Riegel;  William,  who  was  twice  married,  his  second  wife  being 
Susan  Riegel;  Daniel;  Joseph;  Nathan;  Elizabeth,  wife  of  William  Yeager; 
Rebecca,  who  married  Joseph  Boyer;  and  Sarah,  wife  of  Joseph  Swalm. 

Nathan  Deibert,  father  of  Allen  Joseph  Deibert,  was  born  Dec.  29,  1845, 
on  the  homestead  farm,  and  obtained  his  education  at  Orwigsburg,  attending 
the  pay  schools.  He  worked  for  his  father  until  he  attained  his  majority, 
and  continued  to  assist  him  for  four  years  afterwards,  though  in  the  mean- 
time he  went  to  live  on  a  tract  of  twelve  acres  which  he  owned,  the  place 
where  his  son  Allen  now  resides.  Then  he  bought  some  land  from  the  home- 
stead tract,  increasing  the  area  of  his  property  to  forty-one  acres,  all  of  which 
was  cleared  and  under  cultivation.  Mr.  Deibert  continued  to  operate  this 
tract  until  his  death,  which  occurred  March  31,  191 1.  He  did  general  farming, 
and  marketed  at  Pottsville.  Diligent,  and  honorable  in  all  his  transactions,  he 
was  a  creditable  member  of  a  family  generally  known  for  solid  worth,  and 
like  his  father  was  a  Democrat  and  a  Lutheran,  belonging  to  St.  Paul's  Church 
at  Orwigsburg.  Mr.  Deibert  married  Susanna  Gerber,  who  was  bom  June 
22,  1848,  daughter  of  John  and  Louisa  (Bock)  Gerber,  natives  of  East  Bruns- 
wick township,  this  county.  Mrs.  Deibert  died  a  few  months  before  her  hus- 
band, on  Sept.  27,  1910,  and  they  are  buried  in  the  cemetery  of  St.  Paul's 
Church.  They  had  the  following  children:  John  Franklin,  bom  Sept.  9, 
1871,  married  Kjate  Heine;  Annie  Elizabeth,  bom  Aug.  20,  1872,  married 
Wellington  Lengle;  Allen  Joseph  is  next  in  the  family;  Edwin  Lewis,  bom 
Oct.  12,  1874,  married  Sallie  Meek;  Sallie  Louisa,  bom  Nov.  25,  1875,  niar- 
ried  Harvey  Fisher;  Gertrude  May,  bom  Jan.  5,  1877,  married  Paul  Lengle; 
Ada  Rebecca,  bom  Jan.  25,  1878,  is  unmarried;  Charles  Walter,  born  Nov. 
13,  1879,  married  Maude  Milton;  Mary  Alice,  bom  Feb.  7,  1881,  is  unmar- 
ried; Howard  Nathan,  born  Nov.  16,  1882,  married  Jennie  Fessler;  George 
Abner,  bom  May  29,  1884,  married  Gertrude  Horton.;  Oscar  Luther,  bom 
June  13,  1885,  married  Sadie  Sechler;  Florence  Hannah,  bom  Jan.  8,  1887, 
is  unmarried;  Elmer  Robert,  bom  March  31,  1889,  is  unmarried;  Alice  Mabel, 


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748  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

bom  June  20,  1891,  died  Oct.  15,  1896;  Clayton  Gerber,  bom  April  13,  1892, 
married  Mabel  Frantz;  Richard  Ellsworth,  bom  March  11,  1894,  died  Sept. 
30,  1900. 

Allen  Joseph  Deibert,  bom  July  26,  1873,  in  the  borough  of  Orwigsburg, 
was  reared  and  educated  there,  and  received  his  agricultural  training  prin- 
cipally at  home,  working  for  his  father  until  eighteen  years  old.  After  that 
he  hired  out  to  other  farmers  for  several  years,  and  then  tumed  to  railroad 
work,  entering  the  employ  of  the  Lehigh  Valley  Railway  Company,  by  whom 
he  was  engaged  as  section  hand  for  a  period  of  fifteen  years.  In  1913  he 
bought  his  father's  farm  from  the  estate,  and  there  he  has  since  carried  on 
general  agriculture  with  steady  success.  He  sells  some  of  his  produce  in  his 
own  borough  and  some  at  Pottsville,  and  finds  a  ready  market  for  all  his  crops. 
Mr.  Deibert  devotes  practically  all  his  time  to  his  own  business,  but  he  is 
always  found  on  the  side  of  progress  and  local  improvement  in  movements 
affecting  his  section.  His  political  support  is  given  to  the  Democratic  party, 
and  his  religious  connection  is  with  St.  Paul's  Lutheran  Church,  the  religious 
home  of  his  family  for  several  generations.  Socially  he  belongs  to  Industrial 
Council,  No.  437,  Order  of  Independent  Americans,  of  Orwie^burg. 

Mr.  Deibert  married  Amanda  Heim,  who  was  bom  Feb.  19,  1871,  in 
Pickaway  county,  Ohio,  where  she  began  her  schooling.  Then  the  family 
moved  to  Chase  county,  Kans.,  where  she  also  attended  school  four  years, 
receiving  the  rest  of  her  education  in  West  Bmnswick  township,  Schuylkill 
Co.,  Pa.  She  was  sixteen  years  old  when  she  left  home,  thereafter  working 
out  until  her  marriage.  With  her  husband  she  belongs  to  St.  Paul's  Lutheran 
Church  of  Orwigsburg.  Four  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Deibert:  Nathan  Allen,  bom  Feb.  15,  1902;  Lillian  Amanda,  Oct.  22,  1903; 
Stella  Levira,  Dec.  12,  1905;  Mahlon  Edwin,  Jan.  6,  1909.  All  have  attended 
school  in  Orwigsburg. 

Benjamin  Helm,  father  of  Mrs.  Allen  T.  Deibert,  was  bom  on  Sculp's 
Hill,  in  West  Bmnswick  township,  Schuylkill  county,  and  lived  to  the  age  of 
seventy-five  years.  By  trade  he  was  a  carpenter,  and  he  also  followed  agri- 
cultural pursuits,  he  and  his  brother  Jonathan  owning  in  partnership  a  farm 
of  103  acres,  of  which  about  eighty  acres  were  cleared.  After  farming  on 
that  place  for  a  number  of  years  Benjamin  Heim  sold  his  interest  therein  to  his 
brother,  and  subsequently  worked  as  a  boatbuilder  at  Landingville,  this  county, 
until  his  death.  He  was  a  member  of  Zion's  (Red)  Church  in  West  Bmns- 
wick township.  Politically  he  was  a  Democrat.  Mr.  Heim's  first  wife,  Sarah 
(Heckman),  was  bom  May  4,  1840,  in  East  Ringgold,  Ohio,  and  died  Sept. 
30,  1881,  in  Chase  county,  Kans.,  where  she  is  buried.  Subsequently  he  mar- 
ried Susanna  Miller,  who  died  at  the  age  of  sixty-one  years,  and  is  buried  with 
him  at  Zion'^s  Church.  All  his  children  were  by  the  first  union,  viz. :  Amanda 
is  Mrs.  Allen  Joseph  Deibert,  of  Orwigsburg;  Sarah  Alice  is  married  to  John 
Flammer;  William  Ellsworth  died  when  sixteen  years  old;  Eliza  Henrietta 
married  Morris  Faust;  Benjamin  Herlin  is  deceased:  Lucy  Ellen  married 
John  Moyer;  Jacob  Franklin  married  Gertmde  Follweiler;  Jonathan  Monroe 
married  Lizzie  Wilshire. 

WILLIAM  H.  SIEFERT,  one  of  the  leading  manufacturers  in  his  line 
at  Cressona,  Pa.,  is  proprietor  of  the  Cressona  Wagon  Works,  which  he 
established  in  1905.  He  was  bom  in  the  city  of  Lancaster,  Pa.,  March  30, 
1865,  and  is  a  son  of  William  Siefert,  the  family  being  of  German  descent. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  749 

many  of  the  name  coming  from  the  Fatherland  and  locating  in  various  parts 
of  the  United  States. 

'  WiUiam  Siefert,  the  father,  was  a  resident  of  Lancaster,  Pa.,  where  he 
ran  a  blacksmith  shop  for  many  years,  also  building  wagons  for  his  patrons  in 
the  surrounding  country.  His  children  were  as  follows:  William  H.;  Peter; 
Jacob;  Amiie,  wife  of  Lee  Albert;  Charles;  Joseph;  George;  Leonard;  and 
Elizabeth,  who  is  married  and  lives  in  England. 

William  H.  Siefert  received  his  education  in  Lancaster,  Pa.,  where  he 
learned  the  trade  of  wagonmaker  with  Jacob  Norbeck.  At  the  age  of  nineteen 
years  he  left  Lancaster,  and  thereafter  worked  at  different  places,  following 
his  trade  until  he  settled  at  York,  Pa.,  where  he  remained  for  fourteen  years. 
In  1905  he  came  to  Cressona  and  established  his  present  business.  He  now 
has  a  iai^e  ntunber  of  men  in  his  employ  and  commands  a  fine  patronage, 
carrying  a  line  of  carriages  and  wagons  at  all  times,  besides  building  them  to 
order. 

On  Jan.  30,  1896,  Mr.  Siefert  was  married  to  Emma  Jacobs,  of  York 
county.  Pa.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Siefert  have  had  no  children,  but  they  have  reared 
a  son,  Albert  Louis  Tomes,  who  is  employed  with  his  foster  father  in  the  wagcm 
works.  Mr.  Siefert  and  his  family  are  members  of  the  Roman  Catholic 
Church.  He  is  a  man  of  prominence  in  the  community  where  he  resides  and 
is  respected  by  all  with  whom  he  comes  in  contact. 

JACOB  WILLIAM  CLAUSER,  painter,  decorator  and  paperhanger,  of 
Auburn,  Schuylkill  county,  was  bom  Oct.  5,  1867,  i"  Upper  Bern  (now 
Tilden)  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  son  of  Simon  Clauser  and  grandson  of 
Wilhelm  Clauser,  all  natives  of  Pennsylvania  and  of  German  descent.  The 
name  of  Clauser  (or  Klauser)  is  well  known  in  the  eastern  part  oTE  Pennsyl- 
vania, many  of  the  prominent  families  of  that  section  being  in  some  way 
connected  with  it  by  ties  of  blood.  It  is  not  known  who  was  the  founder  of 
the  branch  of  the  family  to  which  Jacob  WilUam  Clauser  belongs. 

Wilhelm  Clauser;  the  grandfather,  was  a  farmer  in  Upper  Bern  town- 
ship, where  he  cleared  and  cultivated  a  farm  of  seventy  acres.  He  was  a 
Democrat  politically,  and  he  and  his  wife  were  active  members  of  St.  Michael's 
Church  in  Upper  Bern  township.  Both  lived  to  beyond  threescore  and  ten, 
and  are  laid  at  rest  near  the  church  which  they  so  faithfully  attended  in  life. 
By  his  wife  Elizabeth  (Kauffman)  Wilhelm  Clauser  had  seven  children,  as 
follows:  William  married  a  Sauser;  Daniel  married  Catherine  Lindermuth; 
Simon  is  mentioned  below;  Kate  married  Joseph  Savage;  Harrison  married 
Rebecca  Snyder;  Adam  married  a  Nunnemacher;  Tacob  married  Sarah  Long. 

Simon  Clauser  was  bom  in  Upper  Bern  township,  Berks  county,  and  fol- 
lowed farming  all  of  his  life.  He  had  a  tract  of  twenty  acres  which  he  brought 
to  a  high  state  of  cultivation  and  thereby  supported  a  large  family.  He  was 
a  Democrat  and  a  zealous  member  of  St.  Michael's  Reformed  Church  in 
Upper  Bern  township,  having  served  in  all  of  the  offices  within  its  gift.  He 
and  his  wife  are  both  buried  in  the  cemetery  adjoining  the  church.  Mr. 
Qauser  married  Mary  Kline,  a  daughter  of  John  Kline,  and  they  had  these 
children:  Kate  married  Jacob  Haas  and  lives  in  Reading,  Pa.;  Amelia  mar- 
ried Nathaniel  ICalbach,  and  both  are  deceased;  Emma  married  Henry  Weid- 
man  and  resides  at  Bern  Station,  Pa. ;  Simon  J.  married  Sarah  Kramer,  and 
is  living  at  Summit  Station,  Pa. ;  Frank  married  Amelia  Knoll  and  lives  in 
Tulpehockcn  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa. ;  Alice  married  William  Kirst,  of  Ham- 


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750  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

burg,  Pa. ;  Joanna  married  Frank  Dunkelberger  and  died  at  the  age  of  twenty- 
four,  of  diphtheria;  Agnes  died  when  three  months  old;  Mary  married  a  Mr. 
Bowers,  of  Reading,  and  is  deceased;  Sallie  married  Howard  Nunnemacher, 
and  is  deceased ;  Jacob  W.  is  mentioned  below ;  Lillie  married  Claude  Reber, 
of  Hamburg.  Simon  Clauser  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-one  years,  and  his 
wife  at  the  age  of  sixty-seven. 

Jacob  William  Clauser  was  educated  in  the  township  schools  and  assisted 
his  father  on  the  farm  until  he  was  fifteen  years  of  age.  Then  he  went  to 
Wayne  township,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  became  apprenticed  to  his 
brother  Simon  J.,  learning  paperhanging,  decorating  and  painting.  After  the 
end  of  his  apprenticeship  he  remained  with  his  brother  for  three  years  more, 
and  then  went  to  Pottsville  and  entered  the  employ  of  Spehrley  &  Shappell, 
with  whom  he  continued  in  the  same  line  of  work  for  eight  years.  He  then 
went  into  business  for  himself  at  Summit  Station,  Wayne  township,  continu- 
ing there  for  seven  years,  but  as  the  greater  portion  of  his  business  engage- 
ments were  in  Auburn  he  decided  to  settle  there.  Since  his  removal  to  Auburn 
twelve  years  ago  he  has  built  up  a  business  of  about  three  hundred  rooms 
a  year  (decorating  and  papering),  and  employs  on  an  average  six  painters 
all  the  year  round. 

Mr.  Clauser  married  Carrie  V.  Krammes,  who  wa^  bom  near  Summit 
Station  July  2,  1869,  daughter  of  C.  H.  Krammes,  of  Auburn.  By  this  mar- 
riage there  have  been  born  five  children:  Alberta  Agnes,  born  Oct.  13,  1887, 
married  to  Wilson  Reed,  of  Auburn,  Pa. ;  Earlin  Francis,  bom  July  8,  1891 ; 
Clarence  Clayton,  bom  July  17,  1899;  Reynold  Ray,  bom  March  30,  1905; 
and  Arthur  Jacob,  bom  June  26,  1908.  Mr.  Clauser  is  a  Democrat,  has  held 
the  office  of  auditor  of  Wayne  township  for  two  terms  of  three  years  each, 
and  is  now  serving  his  third  three-year  term  as  councilman  of  the  borough 
of  Aubum.  He  is  a  member  and  past  president  of  Washington  Camp  No. 
507,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  of  Summit  Station,  was  financial  and  recording  secretary 
of  his  home  camp  for  thirteen  years,  and  has  been  delegate  to  the  State  camp. 
Formerly  a  member  of  the  Summit  Reformed  Church,  he  is  now  a  member  of 
the  Reformed  Church  at  Aubum. 

John  Kline,  matemal  grandfather  of  Jacob  W.  Clauser,  was  a  farmer  of 
Upper  Bern  township,  Berks  county,  where  he  cultivated  a  piece  of  ground 
comprising  thirty  acres.  He  married  a  Nunnemacher,  and  they  had  three 
children,  only  one  daughter  surviving  at  this  writing.  Both  parents  died  in 
extreme  old  age,  and  are  buried  in  St.  Michael's  cemetery,  Tilden  township, 
Berks  county. 

The  Krammes  family,  of  which  Mrs.  J.  W.  Clauser  is  a  member,  is  of 
German  origin  and  is  one  of  prominence  in  this  section  of  the  State.  A  detailed 
sketch  of  the  family  will  be  found  in  the  personal  sketch  of  C.  H.  Krammes, 
of  Aubum,  elsewhere. 

ERNEST  GRUBE  is  one  of  the  notably  progressive  farmer  citizens  of 
East  Bmnswick  township,  enterprising  in  the  management  of  his  business 
undertakings  and  public-spirited  in  all  matters  involving  the  general  welfare. 
His  praiseworthy  attention  to  public  affairs  and  to  the  religious  activities  of 
the  locality  has  won  the  approval  and  gratitude  of  the  best  element,  and  he 
has  surely  had  his  reward  in  the  good  results  which  have  marked  Jhe  wake 
of  his  efforts. 

Mr.  Gmbe  belongs  to  a  substantial  German  family  which  was  founded  in 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  751 

the  township  over  fifty  years  ago.  His  grandfather,  Christian  Grube,  lived  in 
the  province  of  Hanover,  Germany,  and  was  a  silver  miner  by  occupation. 
He  died  at  the  comparatively  early  age  of  thirty-six,  leaving  a  wife  and  five 
children,  namely:  Charles,  the  father  of  Ernest  Grube;  Charlotte;  Louisa, 
Mrs.  Charles  Heberling;  Dorothy,  Mrs.  John  Weist;  and  William,  who  was 
one  year  old  when  his  father  died.  The  mother,  whose  maiden  name  was 
Hannah  Shear,  was  a  native  of  Hanover,  Germany,  and  died  at  the  age  of 
seventy-seven  in  East  Brunswick  township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  at  the  home 
of  her  son-in-law,  Charles  Heberling.  She  was  a  member  of  the  German 
Lutheran  Church,  and  is  buried  in  the  Frieden's  Church  cemetery.  Mrs. 
Grube  came  to  America  with  her  children  eighteen  years  after  her  husband'^ 
death,  the  family  settling  in  Baltimore,  Md.,  for  two  years,  and  removing 
thence  to  Schuylkill  county,  Pennsylvania. 

Chartes  Grube,  son  of  Christian,  was  bom  in  Klausthal,  Province  of  Han- 
over, Germany,  and  he  was  reared  and  educated  there.  Like  his  father  he 
became  a  silver  miner,  and  continued  to  follow  that  occupation  until  twenty- 
five  years  old,  when  he  came  to  America  with  his  brother  William,  landing 
at  Baltimore,  Md.  After  some  residence  there  the  brothers  came  to  Schuyl- 
kill county.  Pa.,  locating  at  Lewistown,  in  Walker  township,  and  for  a  time 
worked  out  among  the  farmers  of  that  section.  Subsequently  they  settled 
in  East  Brunswick  township^  this  county,  where  they  bought  a  tract  of  about 
sixty-six  acres,  which  they  cleared  and  settled  on,  each  brother  putting  up  his 
own  farm  buildings,  though  the  land  was  operated  in  partnership.  They  con- 
tinued to  live  there  for  a  period  of  about  thirty  years,  and  at  the  end  of  that 
time  Charles  Grube  sold  his  share  of  the  tract  to  his  son-in-law,  Henry  Weast. 
Then  he  returned  to  Baltimore,  where  he  had  a  dairy  and  milk  route  for  a 
few  years,  giving  it  up  to  take  employment  in  the  William  Wilkens  bristle 
works,  as  a  jointer.  There  he  remained  as  long  as  he  was  able  to  work, 
retiring  about  four  years  before  his  death,  which  occurred  about  1909,  when 
he  was  seventy-seven  years  old.  While  a  resident  of  Schuylkill  county  Mr. 
Grube  belonged  to  the  Frieden's  Lutheran  Church  of  New  Ringgold.  Polit- 
ically he  was  identified  with  the  Democratic  party.  All  of  his  children  were 
bom  to  his  first  marriage,  to  Melsena  Depmeier,  who  died  aged  forty-eight 
years  and  is  buried  in  the  Frieden's  Church  cemetery.  His  second  marriage 
was  to  Mrs.  Julia  Smith,  who  is  also  deceased,  and  is  buried  with  Mr.  Grube 
at  Baltimore.  We  have  the  following  record  of  his  family:  Malinda  is  the 
wife  of  Frank  Kroll,  of  Philadelphia,  Pa.;  Hannah  married  Daniel  S.  Bock, 
of  Lehighton,  Pa.;  Louisa  married  Henry  Weast  (deceased)  and  (second) 
Henry  Keffer,  and  is  a  resident  of  Leesport,  Pa. ;  Ernest  is  next  in  the  family ; 
John,  of  Scranton,  Pa.,  married  Hannah  Dillinger;  Christian,  who  lives  in 
East  Brunswick  township,  married  Clara  Dennis. 

Ernest  Grube  was  bom  Au^.  17,  1862,  in  East  Brunswick  township,  where 
he  grew  to  manhood  and  received  a  common  school  education.  He  worked 
for  his  father  until  he  attained  his  majority.  When  he  commenced  life  on 
his  own  account  he  went  to  Philadelphia,  where  he  was  employed  as  a  driver 
by  the  Knickerbocker  Ice  Company,  and  assisted  in  unloading  vessels.  Going 
West,  for  a  time  he  was  located  at  Janesville,  Wis.,  where  he  was  employed 
as  a  telegraph  operator,  and  from  there  went  to  Chicago,  where  he  remained 
for  two  years  as  operator  in  the  employ  of  the  Western  Union  Company.  His 
next  change  was  to  Hamilton  (now  Savage),  Minn.,  where  he  was  employed  as 
a  telegraph  operator  by  the  Chicago,  St.  Paul,  Minneapolis  &  Omaha  Railroad 


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752  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Company,  and  he  subsequently  wdrked  at  Windom  and  Le  Sueur,  that  State, 
remaining  two  years  at  the  latter  place,  where  he  was  married.  Returning 
to  Savage,  he  wa^  again  stationed  there  for  a  considerable  period,  working 
for  the  railroad  company  mentioned  ten  years  in  all,  and  on  leaving  that 
employ  returned  to  his  old  home  in  East  Bnmswick  township,  Schuylkill 
county.  Here  he  bought  the  Frank  McGorvin  farm  of  148  acres,  forty  of 
which  are  imder  cultivation,  devoted  to  general  crops.  Mr.  Grube  has  had 
excellent  returns  for  his  labor,  and  markets  his  produce  at  Tamaqua.  He 
has  taken  an  active  part  in  local  affairs,  was  formerly  auditor  of  the  township, 
and  is  at  present  a  member  of  the  board  of  school  directors,  of  which  body 
he  served  seven  years  as  secretary.  He  is  independent  in  politics,  giving  his 
support  to  the  men  and  measures  he  likes  best,  r^^ardless  of  party.  Mr. 
Grube  is  a  Lutheran  in  religious  faith,  belonging  to  the  Frieden's  Church  at 
New  Ringgold,  in  which  he  holds  the  office  of  trustee  at  present. 

Mr.  Grube  married  Minnie  Catherine  Ipsen,  who  was  bom  at  Elmshom, 
Holstein,  Germany,  Oct.  24,  1867,  and  received  her  education  there,  being 
twelve  years  old  when  she  came  to  America  with  her  parents.  She  is  also  a 
member  of  the  Frieden's  Lutheran  Church  at  New  Ringgold.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Grube  have  had  the  following  children :  Melsena,  bom  Feb.  22,  1893,  attended 
the  Keystone  State  Normal  School  at  Kutztown,  Pa.,  class  of  191 5;  Lucy,  bora 
Feb.  12,  189s,  died  in  infancy,  and  is  buried  at  Le  Sueur,  Minn.;  Harriet;  bom 
Feb.  17,  1896,  is  teaching  at  the  Bachert  school  in  East  Brunswick  township; 
Ema  was  bom  Jan.  26,  1900;  Doris,  June  26,  1902;  Jessie,  Oct.  20,  1904; 
Emest,  March  15,  1907;  Marian,  July  26,  1910;  Marvin,  June  2,  1913. 

Mrs.  Grube's  grandfather  was  a  native  of  Elmshom,  Holstein,  Germany, 
and  passed  all  his  life  at  that  place,  where  he  was  engaged  as  a  mail  clerk. 
He  and  his  wife  died  and  are  buried  in  Germany.  They  were  faithful  mem- 
bers of  the  German  Lutheran  Church.  Their  children  were:  August,  Carl, 
Ferdinand,  Herman,  Edward,  Adolph,  Minnie  and  Louisa. 

Adolph  Ipsen,  father  of  Mrs.  Gmbe,  was  bom  Dec.  18,  1842,  at  Elms- 
hom, was  reared  there,  and  received  an  excellent  common  school  education. 
When  twenty  years  old  he  became  a  mail  clerk  in  the  post  office  with  his  father. 
About  thirty-five  years  ago  he  came  to  America  with  his  family,  landing  at 
New  York  City,  whence  they  proceeded  to  Le  Sueur,  Minn.,  where  he  still 
makes  his  home.  He  was  in  the  employ  of  the  same  railroad  company  as  his 
son-in-law,  Mr.  Grube,  retiring  after  a  service  of  twenty  years.  His  wife, 
whose  maiden  name  was  Anna  Catherine  Schumacher,  was  also  a  native  of 
Germany,  bom  Aug.  14,  1844,  daughter  of  Peter  and  Lucy'(Kelting)  Schu- 
macher, and  the  following  children  were  bom  to  this  union:  Augusta,  now 
the  wife  of  John  Buckland,  of  Crookston,  Minn.;  Minnie  Catherine,  Mrs. 
Emest  Gmbe;  Carl;  Margaret,  who  died  in  Germany;  Ferdinand,  who  died 
in  Germany;  Celia,  who  died  when  twenty-two  years  old;  Julius  and  Jessie, 
at  home;  Lucy,  Mrs.  Henry  Brocker,  of  Mankato,  Minn.;  and  Adolph,  who 
lives  at  home.  The  parents  are  members  of  the  German  Lutheran  Church, 
and  Mr.  Ipsen  is  a  Democrat  in  his  political  views. 

FRANK  J.  HUMMEL,  of  MinersviUe,  is  a  son  of  a  worthy  resident 
of  that  borough,  Engelhart  Hummel,  who  established  the  name  there  in 
1850,  and  father  and  son  have  been  associated  with  the  same  line  of  business 
in  the  sixty-five  years  which  have  elapsed  since*    The  father  was  a  cabinet- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  753 

maker  and  Frank  J.  Hummel  is  the  leading  undertaker  at  MinersviUe,  and 
also  engaged  as  a  furniture  dealer. 

Engelhart  Hummel  was  bom  at  Hofheim,  Germany,  July  21,  1824,  and 
there  grew  to  manhood,  meantime  learning  cabinetmaking.  Q)ming  to  America 
in  1849,  he  landed  at  Baltimore,  Md.,  where  he  found  employment  for  a  short 
time  in  a  piano  factory.  The  same  year  he  removed  to  Pennsylvania,  locat- 
ing at  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  county,  whence  in  1850  he  removed  to  Miners- 
viUe, at  which  place  he  made  his  permanent  honxe.  For  about  the  first  two 
years,  until  1852,  he  was  in  the  employ  of  M.  Weiser,  was  afterwards  with 
Ambrose  McGee  until  1853,  and  then  returned  to  Mr.  Weiser  for  a  brief 
p>eriod.  In  1854  he  formed  a  partnership  with  John  Brock,  and  though  they 
were  burned  out  the  same  year,  they  kept  up  the  business,  remaining  in  part- 
nership until  1856.  In  1857  Mr.  Hummel  embarked  in  business  on  his  own 
account,  and  was  so  occupied  until  1884.  He  was  a  skilled  workman  and  a 
typical  German  artisan,  and  he  made  the  first  walnut  casket  ever  produced  in 
MinersviUe.  He  was  a  substantial  citizen  and  took  an  intelligent  interest  in 
the  general  aflfairs  of  the  town,  serving  as  a  member  of  its  council  from  1861 
to  1864,  and  as  a  member  of  the  school  board  from  1864  to  1901.  His  death 
occurred  Dec.  13,  1902,  when  he  was  aged  seventy-eight  years,  four  months, 
twenty-two  days,  and  he  is  buried  in  the  German  Catholic  cemetery  at  Miners- 
viUe. Mr.  Hummel's  first  wife,  Barbara,  whom  he  married  in  Baltimore  Nov. 
25,  1849,  was  bom  in  1822  and  died  in  1865.  His  second  marriage  was  to 
Gertrude  Gehn  and  took  place  June  27,  1869.  To  them  were  bom  two  sons, 
Frank  J.,  on  March  15,  1870,  and  Engelhart,  on  May  15,  1871.  The  mother 
died  in  1872,  and  in  October,  1874,  Mr.  Hummel  married  (third)  Mrs.  Bar- 
bara Ritzel. 

Frank  J.  Hummel  was  bom  at  MinersviUe,  where  he  passed  his  boyhood 
in  attendance  at  the  public  schools.  As  his  father's  assistant  he  became  thor- 
oughly grounded  in  the  details  of  the  furniture  business,  and  in  1890  went  to 
New  York  City,  where  he  clerked  in  a  hardware  store,  meantime  also  taking 
a  course  at  a  school  of  embalmin^^,  from  which  he  was  graduated  in  1898. 
Returning  to  MinersviUe,  he  established  his  present  business  on  Feb.  15,  1901, 
and  he  has  had  a  steadily  increasing  trade  ever  since.  His  location  is  at  the 
comer  of  Fourth  and  Sunbury  streets.  He  has  coaches  for  hire,  deals  exten- 
sively in  fine  furniture  and  conducts  the  leading  undertaking  business  in  this 
section,  having  had  charge  of  2,600  funerals.  Mr.  Hummel  has  been  thor- 
oughly progressive  about  keeping  abreast  with  the  modem  ideas  and  methods 
in  his  line,  and  he  is  untiring  in  his  efforts  to  give  the  utmost  satisfaction  to 
all  his  patrons,  his  reputation  in  this  respect  being  proverbial.  He  has  gained 
a  substantial  position  in  the  business  world,  and  is  also  regarded  as  a  trust- 
worthy public  official,  having  given  three  years  of  efficient  service  on  the 
school  board. 

Mr.  Hummel  married  Mar^ret  Connelly,  and  they  have  five  children, 
Engelhart  P.,  Gertrude  and  Regina  (twins),  Helen  and  Jack. 

REV.  HENRY  HEPLER  has  been  a  minister  of  the  United  Evangelical 
Church  for  over  twenty-five  years,  and  though  now  retired  to  some  extent 
from  active  duties  still  retains  his  interest  and  connection  with  the  work,  giv- 
ing useful  service  to  the  denomination  in  his  own  locality  or  wherever  he  is 
called. 

The  Hepler  family  has  been  in  Schuykill  county  from  pioneer  days,  and 

Vol.  n— 10 


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754  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Jacob  M.  Hepler,  father  of  Rev.  Henry  Hepler,  was  bom  here,  in  the  Ma- 
hantongo  valley.  He  learned  blacksmithing  and  followed  his  trade  entirely 
during  his  earlier  years,  devoting  the  later  part  of  his  life  to  preaching  as  a 
minister  of  the  Church  of  God.  At  the  time  of  his  death,  which  occurred  in 
1894,  he  was  making  his  home  with  his  son  Henr)'.  He  married  Elizabeth 
Haupt,  who  was  bom  in  the  Mahanoy  valley,  this  county,  and  was  also  of 
pioneer  stock.  She  died  in  i8p2.  We  have  the  following  record  of  the  ten 
children  bom  to  them:  Catherine,  the  eldest,  now  deceased,  was  the  wife  of 
Joseph  Kehler,  of  this  county;  Elizabeth,  deceased,  was  the  wife  of  William 
Stitzer;  Sarah,  deceased,  was  the  wife  of  George  Krause,  of  this  county; 
Polly,  deceased,  wa*  the  wife  of  Daniel  Snyder;  Hettie,  the  widow  of  Louis 
Lybolt,  lives  at  Tamaqua,  this  county;  Henry  is  next  in  the  family;  Samuel, 
deceased,  was  in  ^he  Union  service  during  the  Civil  war ;  Lydia,  deceased,  was 
the  wife  of  John  Phillips ;  Harriet  married  Isaac  Christ  and  both  are  deceased, 
his  death  occurring  first ;  Elmira  is  the  wife  of  Michael  Sickinger,  of  Johns- 
town, Pennsylvania. 

Henry  Hepler  was  bom  Nov.  2,  18^8,  in  the  Mahantongo  valley,  this 
county,  where  he  was  reared,  receiving  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
the  neighborhood.  In  his  boyhood  he  started  to  learn  the  trade  of  carpenter, 
which  he  has  followed  practically  all  his  life,  although  for  many  years  much 
of  his  time  was  given  to  the  work  of  the  ministry,  upon  which  he  entered  in 
the  year  1888.  He  has  been  one  of  the  efficient  servants  of  the  United  Evan- 
gelical denomination  in  his  section,  doing  valuable  work  for  the  church  and 
Sunday  school,  and  still  continues  his  activities,  although  not  to  the  same 
extent  as  formerly.  Meantime  he  has  also  followed  the  occupation  of  carpen- 
ter very  successfully.  Mr.  Hepler  has  not  been  associated  with  public  affairs 
directly,  but  he  has  always  been  a  public-spirited  citizen,  and  during  the  Civil 
war  gave  almost  four  years  of  service  to  the  Union  cause,  enlisting  in  Sep- 
tember, 1 86 1,  in  Company  E,  55th  Pennsylvania  Infantry.  He  became  sergeant 
of  his  company.  Considerable  field  service  fell  to  the  lot  of  his  command,  and 
he  took  part  in  sixteen  battles,  including :  Edisto  Island,  Pocotaligo,  Old  Town 
Creek,  Proctor's  Creek,  Derry  Creek,  Cold  Harbor,  Correctory  Hill,  Signal 
Hill,  Hatcher's  Run,  Chapin  Farm,  capture  of  Petersburg  and  Appomattox. 
Mr.  Hepler  was  mustered  out  in  August,  1865,  at  Petersburg,  Va.,  and  received 
an  honorable  discharge.  Returning  to  his  home  after  the  war  was  over,  Mr. 
Hepler  resumed  work  at  his  trade.  In  1879  he  moved  to  Ashland,  where  he 
has  since  resided,  and  he  has  owned  his  present  home  at  No.  1219  Arch  street 
for  several  years. 

In  1866  he  was  married  to  Fietta  Schwalm,  who  was  bom  in  Schuylkill 
county,  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Christana  (Klinger)  Schwalm,  who  lived  and 
died  at  their  birthplace  in  Schuylkill  county.  Mr.  Schwalm  was  a  carpenter 
and  farmer  all  his  life.  Mrs.  Hepler  was  the  eldest  of  his  thirteen  children, 
the  others  being:  Samuel,  now  deceased;  Catherine,  deceased,  who  was  the 
wife  of  Abram  Carr,  of  this  county;  Hannah,  who  is  the  widow  of  Gerald 
Faust,  of  Reading,  Pa.;  Chestina,  wife  of  Charles  Hoffman,  of  Schuylkill 
county ;  Nathaniel,  a  resident  of  Williamstown,  Pa. ;  Henry,  who  lives  on  the 
old  homestead  in  Schuylkill  county;  Mary,  the  wife  of  Samuel  Herb,  of  this 
county;  Monroe,  a  farmer  in  Schuylkill  county;  Ellen,  the  wife  of  Victor 
Blyler,  of  this  county;  George,  deceased;  Polly,  deceased;  and  Victoria, 
deceased. 

Eight  children  have  been  bom  to  the  union  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hepler:  Eliza- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  755 

beth  is  married  to  Thomas  Hughes,  of  Ashland ;  Oscar  is  a  resident  of  Ash- 
land ;  Catherine  is  the  wife  of  David  Grove,  of  Northampton,  Pa. ;  the  other 
five  are  deceased.  Mrs.  Hepler,  like  her  husband,  is  a  faithful  member  of  the 
United  Evangelical  Church. 

JACKSON  M.  SHELLHAMER  has  recently  established  himself  in  busi- 
ness at  Orwigsburg,  where  he  acquired  his  early  experience  in  the  furniture 
trade  and  undertaking  with  Mr.  Greenawald,  one  of  the  old  merchants  of  that 
place. 

The  Shellhamer  family  is  of  German  origin,  and  former  generations  spelled 
the  name  Schellhammer.  They  were  among  the  early  settlers  of  Berks  county, 
this  State.  Jared  Shellhamer,  grandfather  of  Jackson  M.  Shellhamer,  was  a 
native  of  Strausstown,  Berks  county,  and  came  to  Schuylkill  county  when  a 
young  man,  settling  at  McKeansburg.  He  was  a  tailor  by  trade  and  followed 
that  calling  at  McKeansburg  during  his  active  years.  He  died  there  at  the 
age  of  seventy-seven  years.  His  children  were:  Albert,  Willoughby,  James, 
Louisa  and  Geonous. 

Geonous  Shellhamer,  father  of  Jackson  M.  Shellhamer,  was  a  carpenter, 
and  followed  his  trade  at  McKeansburg  and  throughout  the  adjoining  terri- 
tory. His  death  occurred  in  1885.  His  wife,  Josephine,  was  a  daughter  of 
Charles  Shellhamer,  and  they  were  the  parents  of  four  children :  Rosa,  Cora, 
Harrison  and  Jackson  M. 

Jackson  M.  Shellhamer  was  bom  Nov.  3,  1882,  at  McKeansburg,  Schuylkill 
county,  where  he  was  reared  and  educated,  attending  the  public  schools.  He 
remained  on  the  farm  until  the  ag-e  of  sixteen  years,  when  he  came  to  Orwigs- 
burg and  entered  the  employ  of  Mr.  Greenawald,  with  whom  he  remained 
seven  years,  learning  the  details  of  the  undertaking  business  thoroughly  under 
his  efficient  tutelage.  Having  decided  to  embark  in  the  business  on  his  own 
account,  Mr.  Shellhamer  established  himself  at  Pine  Grove,  where  he  had  a 
successful  trade.  After  several  years,  however,  he  concluded  that  Orwigs- 
burg offered  a  wider  field  and  better  promise  for  expansion  of  trade,  and  he 
entered  business  in  that  borough  April  i,  1914.  Both  as  a  dealer  in  furniture 
and  as  an  undertaker  he  has  a  large  trade,  with  every  prospect  of  becoming 
one  of  the  leading  men  in  his  line  in  Schuylkill  county.  He  is  ambitious  and 
willing  to  work  to  further  his  enterprises,  and  he  has- the  substantial  qualities 
which  win  and  hold  confidence. 

In  June,  1914,  Mr.  Shellhamer  married  Beulah  Martin,  of  Pipe  Grove, 
daughter  of  John  Martin.  Fraternally  Mr.  Shellhamer  is  a  member  of  the 
Independent  Order  of  Odd  Fellows  and  the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men. 
While  at  Pine  Grove  he  became  a  member  of  St.  John's  Lutheran  Church 
there. 

EDWARD  KLASE,  a  prosperous  and  prominent  farmer  and  dairyman  of 
Butler  township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  was  born  in  Germany,  in  the  kingdom 
of  Saxony,  son  of  Ferdinand  and  Amelia  Klase,  both  also  natives  of  that 
country. 

Edward  Klase  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Germany  and  for  a  time 
worked  in  the  mines  there.  At  the  age  of  fourteen  years  he  came  to  America, 
in  the  year  1861,  settling  at  Ashland,  where  he  found  work  in  the  mines, 
continuing  to  be  so  employed  until  1881.  He  then  bought  a  tract  of  twenty- 
eight  acres,  the  beginning  of  his  present  farm  of  ninety-eight  acres,  and  has 


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756  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

since  developed  all  its  possibilitfes  agriculturally  until  it  is  one  of  the  best  in 
the  county.  He  also  runs  a  dairy  in  connection,  selling  his  milk  to  residents 
of  Girardville. 

On  June  2,  1872,  Mr.  Klase  was  married,  at  Girardville,  to  Barbara  Wick- 
line,  who  was  bom  in  Germany  July  15,  1848,  and  died  April  2,  1914;  she  is 
buried  in  the  Island  cemetery,  near  her  home. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Klase  were  bom  six  children,  as  follows:  Edward,  who 
is  in  Nebraska ;  August,  who  is  at  home  on  the  farm ;  William  C,  a  shoe  mer- 
chant, of  Ashland;  Frederick,  at  home  on  the  farm;  Anna,  wife  of  Louis 
Schlee,  of  Girardville;  and  Eva,  wife  of  Charles  Tmnmetter,  of  Gordon,  this 
county.  Mr.  Klase  and  his  family  are  members  of  the  German  Lutheran 
Church.    He  is  one  of  the  directors  of  the  Island  cemetery. 

HENRY  LEONHARDT,  proprietor  of  a  bakery  and  confectionery  at 
Girardville,  Schuylkill  county,  was  born  in  Fountain  Springs,  this  county, 
July  30,  1867,  son  of  Peter  and  Louise  (Uhl)  Leonhardt. 

The  family  is  of  German  descent.  Peter  Leonhardt  was  bom  in  Germany, 
and  came  to  America  at  an  early  date,  settling  in  Schuylkill  county.  Pa.,  where 
he  worked  in  the  mines  all  the  remainder  of  his  life,  dying  in  April,  1904. 
For  a  time  he  lived  at  Fountain  Springs.  His  wife  was  a  daughter  of  George 
Uhl,  who  came  to  America  in  the  early  forties  and  settled  in  Sdiiiylkill  county, 
where  he  farmed  until  his  death.  Mrs.  Leonhardt  died  in  1907.  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Leonhardt  had  these  children:  Henry;  Barbara,  wife  of  Frank  Weiss, 
of  Philadelphia;  George,  who  is  a  baker  of  Mahanoy  City;  John,  deceased; 
ai^d  one  child  that  died  in  infancy. 

Henry  Leonhardt  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Girardville,  his  parents 
having  come  here  in  1868.  He  worked  for  a  short  time  in  the  mines,  and  then 
at  the  age  of  seventeen  began  to  learn  the  trade  of  baker.  After  he  com- 
pleted his  apprenticeship  he  was  employed  at  Shenandoah  and  Hazleton,  and 
twenty-two  years  ago  came  to  Girardville,  where  he  went  into  business  for 
himself.  He  has  made  a  success  of  his  chosen  work,  now  owning  the  build- 
ing in  which  he  has  his  store.  Mr.  Leonhardt  was  married  Feb.  16,  1892,  to 
Annie  Gillespie,  a  native  of  Carbon  county,  daughter  of  Peter  and  Anna 
Gillespie,  early  settlers  of  that  county.  To  this  union  five  children  were  bom : 
Marie,  Anna,  Raymond,  Louise  and  Clara,  the  two  last  named  being  deceased. 
The  mother  died  Jan.  15,  1904,  and  on  April  17,  1906,  Mr.  Leonhardt  was 
married  to  Katie,  the  daughter  of  Thomas  and  Mary  Durkin,  deceased,  of 
Girardville.  Mr.  Leonhardt  is  a  member  of  Fort  Sheridan  Council,  Knights 
of  Columbus,  of  which  he  is  treasurer,  and  of  the  Order  of  Foresters.  He 
and  his  family  are  members  of  St.  Joseph's  Roman  Catholic  Church,  of 
Girardville. 

AMOS  R.  LAMBERSON,  of  Tremont,  settled  in  Schuylkill  county  shortly 
after  the  close  of  the  Civil  war  and  has  been  a  resident  of  the  borough  for 
over  thirty  years.  He  has  been  a  highly  useful  citizen,  doing  his  share  in 
the  maintenance  of  social  and  religious  activities,  and  taking  a  helpful  part 
in  all  local  affairs  of  general  interest.  His  birth  took  place  in  Luzerne  county, 
Pa.,  and  the  family  is  of  Welsh  extraction,  the  ancestor  who  came  to  this 
section  from  Wales  first  settling  in  Maryland.  Jacob  Lamberson,  grandfather 
of  Amos  R.,  came  thence  to  Columbia  county,  Pa.,  making  his  home  near 
Catawissa,  where  he  engaged  in  farming  and  remained  until  his  death.    His 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  757 

f aniily  consisted  of  six  children :  Nicholas,  John,  Samuel,  Aaron,  Esther  and 
Elizabeth. 

Samuel  Lamberson,  father  of  Amos  R.  Lamberson,  was  a  native  of  Co- 
lumbia county,  Pa.,  and  passed  all  his  early  life  there.  Moving  to  Luzerne 
county,  he  lived  a  number  of  years  in  the  Black  Creek  valley,  from  which 
r^on  he  eventually  removed  to  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  spent  his  remain- 
ing years.  He  died  in  this  county.  Mr.  lamberson  was  a  shoemaker  by 
occupation,  and  took  an  active  part  in  politics  durine  his  residence  in  Luzerne 
county,  his  fellow  citizens  honoring  him  frequently  with  election  to  town- 
ship offices.  He  served  faithfully  and  intelligently  in  every  trust.  Samuel 
Lamberson  married  Elizabeth  Fenstermacher,  like  himself  a  native  of  Columbia 
county,  where  her  father  was  a  pioneer  settler ;  he  followed  farming,  and  died 
in  Columbia  cotmty.  Mr.  Fenstermacher  had  children  as  follows:  Eli,  John, 
Peter,  Franklin,  Deborah,  Rebecca  and  Elizabeth  (Mrs.  Lamberson).  The 
last  named  died  in  Schuylkill  county.  She  was  the  mother  of  five  children, 
namely:  Jacob  (the  eldest)  and  Eli  are  deceased;  Aaron  died  in  the  Soldiers' 
Home  at  Hot  Springs,  S.  Dak. ;  Amos  R.  is  the  youngest  son ;  Rebecca  is  the 
wife  of  William  Zimmerman,  a  farmer  of  Schuylkill  county.  All  the  sons 
were  Union  soldiers  during  the  Civil  war,  Aaron  serving  in  the  129th  and  52d 
R^ments,  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Infantry,  and  remaining  in  the  army  until 
the  war  closed. 

Amos  R.  Lamberson  was  bom  Oct.  31,  1842,  in  Luzerne  county.  Pa.,  and 
grew  up  in  Black  Creek  township,  receiving  his  education  in  the  common 
schools  there.  After  leaving  school  he  took  up  telegraphy,  learning  the  work 
in  Lehigh  county.  Pa.,  and  he  followed  it  until  he  entered  the  service  during 
the  Civil  war.  He  enlisted  twice,  the  first  time  from  Whitehall  township, 
Lehigh  county,  as  a  member  of  Company  E,  27th  Pennsylvania  Volunteer 
Infantry,  with  which  he  served  about  two  months.  Reenlisting  in  Company  G, 
52d  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Infantry,  he  continued  in  the  service  until  the 
war  ended,  principally  engaged  in  guard  duty  along  the  Atlantic  coast.  His 
command  was  attached  to  Sherman's  army.  Mr.  Lamberson  was  mustered 
out  at  Salisbury,  N.  C,  and  received  his  discharge  at  Harrisburg,  Pennsyl- 
vania. 

For  about  two  years  after  his  return  from  the  army  Mr.  Lamberson  was 
in  the  service  of  the  Lehigh  Company  in  Lehigh  county,  was  subsequently 
in  Luzerne  county  for  a  time,  and  soon  came  to  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  has 
since  made  his  home.  After  six  years'  service  as  chief  of  police  at  Tamaqua 
he  located  at  Tremont,  and  here  for  thirty  years  he  has  been  special  officer 
for  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Company.  His  long  retention 
in  their  service  is  the  best  comment  on  his  fidelity  to  duty  and  reliable 

character.  r   t     ^    a    t>  t- 

Mr.  Lamberson  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  G.  A.  R.  post  at  Tremont, 
has  filled  all  the  offices,  and  is  serving  at  present  as  adjutant.  He  is  a  local 
leader  in  the  Improved  Order  of  Red  Men,  in  which  he  has  passed  all  the 
chairs,  and  he  has  also  served  in  all  the  official  positions  in  the  Methodist 
Church,  of  which  he  is  an  active  member. 

On  Nov.  26,  1867,  Mr.  Lamberson  was  married,  in  Luzerne  county,  to 
Mary  E.  Hape,  daughter  of  William  and  Catherine  Hape,  natives  of  Germany 
who  came  to  America  many  years  ago,  and  settled  in  Luzerne  county,  Pa., 
where  Mrs.  Lamberson  was  bom,  in  Conyngham  township.  Mr.  Hape  was  a 
farmer  by  occupation.    He  and  his  wife  died  in  Luzerne  county.    Mrs.  Lam- 


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758  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

berson  died  Aug.  30,  1906,  the  mother  of  six  children,  viz. :  Eugene,  the  eldest, 
IS  now  a  resident  of  Clifton,  N.  J.;  Carrie  is  the  wife  of  Clarence  E.  Bierce 
and  lives  at  Oak  Lane,  near  Philadelphia;  Martha,  widow  of  J.  Newton  Kauf- 
man, lives  in  Philadelphia ;  Dora  is  the  wife  of  Frank  H.  Kaufman,  of  Tower 
City,  Pa.;  Minerva  is  the  wife  of  Dr.  F^ley,  of  Tremont;  Harvey,  of  Clifton, 
N.  J.,  is  manager  of  an  asphalt  plant. 

On  Aug.  28,  1910,  Mr.  Lamberson  married  (second)  Mrs.  Mary  E.  (Hess) 
McElwee,  of  Adams  county,  Pennsylvania. 

JOHN  A.  STIEF,  of  Ashland,  who  has  recently  assumed  the  duties  of 
postmaster  at  that  borough,  has  been  one  of  its  lifelong  residents,  and  his 
father  was  one  of  the  most  respected  business  men  there  for  a  period  of  forty 
years. 

The  family  is  of  German  extraction.  Michael  Stief,  father  of  John  A. 
Stief,  was  bom  in  Bavaria,  Germany,  and  coming  to  America  in  1855  first 
located  at  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  The  same  year  he  removed  to 
Ashland,  where  he  engaged  in  business  as  a  grocer,  continuing  this  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  in  1894;  he  is  buried  at  Ashland.  He  was  married  to 
Mary  Tretter  at  Pottsville,  who,  like  himself,  was  a  native  of  Bavaria,  and 
came  to  Schuylkill  county  when  young,  with  brothers.  She  survives  her 
husband,  and  tiiough  now  (1914)  eighty-one  years  of  age  is  in  good  health. 
Eleven  children  were  bom  to  her  and  her  husband  of  whom  Elizabeth,  Mrs. 
Knoblach,  hves  in  Mount  Carmel,  Pa. ;  John  A.  is  mentioned  below ;  Herman 
J.,  a  resident  of  Ashland,  is  engaged  in  the  hardware  business;  Michael  lives  at 
Shamokin,  Pa.;  Peter  lives  at  Mount  Carmel,  Pa.;  Mary  is  the  wife  of 
Theodore  Lentas,  of  Philadelphia,  Pa. ;  Joseph  G.  is  a  business  man  at  Ashland; 
Josephine  is  living  at  home;  Lena  is  the  wife  of  John  Felker,  of  Mount 
Carmel.    The  father  was  a  Democrat  in  political  sentiment. 

John  A.  Stief  was  bora  in  May,  1857,  at  Ashland,  where  he  received  his 
early  education  in  the  public  schools.  Later  he  attended  St.  Vincent's  Col- 
lie, at  Latrobe,  Pa.,  and  after  leaving  school  was  in  the  store  with  his  father 
for  a  time.  In  1873  he  commenced  to  learn  the  trade  of  stonecutter  under 
Frank  Grantz,  at  one  time  county  commissioner  of  Schuylkill  county,  and  he 
continued  in  his  employ  after  completing  his  apprenticeship,  eventuaUy  buying 
him  out,  in  1894.  He  has  since  conducted  the  business  in  his  own  name,  and 
has  been  very  successful,  his  thorough  workmanship  and  reliable  character 
gaining  and  holding  the  confidence  of  his  patrons.  His  high  reputation  in 
business  has  been  supplemented  by  a  most  desirable  record  in  public  service. 
In  1900  he  was  elected  burgess,  holding  that  position  until  1903,  and  was  re- 
elected in  1906,  his  work  during  both  terms  showing  commendable  public 
spirit,  and  strengthening  the  confidence  of  his  fellow  citizens  in  his  ability 
and  trustworthiness.  For  about  four  years  he  was  deputy  coroner  at  Ash- 
land, and  for  five  years  he  filled  the  position  of  health  officer,  in  both  capacities 
discharging  his  duties  with  intelligence  and  the  utmost  fidelity.  In  1913  he 
was  appointed  postmaster,  in  which  position  it  may  reasonably  be  expected  he 
will  acquit  himself  with  characteristic  efficiency.  He  has  always  been  a 
Democrat  in  political  connection.  The  Stiefs  are  Catholics,  and  he  belongs 
to  St.  Mauritius'  Church  at  Ashland,  of  which  his  family  are  also  members. 

In  August,  1877,  Mr.  Stief  was  married  to  Mary  Pelstring,  a  native  of 
Schuylkill  county,  daughter  of  Anthony  and  Lena  (Killhower)  Pelstring,  who 
were  born  in  Bavaria,  Germany,  and  came  to  Schuylkill  county  many  years 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  759 

ago.  They  settled  at  Ashland,  where  Mr.  Pelstring  died  in  1905,  and  where 
his  widow  is  still  living  at  the  age  of  seventy-seven  years.  He  was  a  soap 
and  candle  maker  by  trade.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Pelstring  had  a  family  of  five 
children,  some  of  whom  are  Hving  in  Philadelphia.  Three  children  have 
been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Stief :  Louis,  who  is  assistant  to  his  father  in 
business,  married  Olla  Fulton,  of  Girardville;  Frank,  who  is  also  in  his  father's 
employ,  married  Minnie  Leverentz,  of  Ashland,  and  three  children  have  been 
bom  to  them,  Louis,  Frank  and  John;  Joseph,  who  Uves  at  Mount  Carmel, 
following  the  profession  of  music  teacher,  married  Ellen  Young,  of  that  place, 
and  they  have  one  child,  Helen. 

GREGORY  ACHENBACH,  of  Pine  Grove,  has  displayed  versatile  abil- 
ity in  the  prosecution  of  his  various  activities,  which  have  included  professional, 
business  and  official  occupation.  At  present  he  gives  all  his  time  to  his  duties 
as  justice  of  the  peace,  which  office  he  has  held  since  1896. 

The  Achenbach  family  is  of  German  origin,  and  of  old  standing  in  Schuyl- 
kill county,  William  Achenbach,  grandfather  of  Gregory,  having  been  bom 
in  this  section.  By  calling  he  was  a  farmer.  Removing  to  Pine  Grove,  he 
made  his  permanent  home  there.  His  children  were:  Reuben,  who  is  de- 
ceased ;  William ;  Henry,  a  resident  of  Nebraska ;  Emanuel,  of  Kansas ;  Israel, 
of  Lebanon,  Pa. ;  Louis,  who  lives  at  Iowa ;  Jacob,  deceased ;  Angeline ;  Cath- 
erine, wif6  of  Charles  Brommer,  of  Philadelphia ;  and  Cecilia,  wife  of  Solomon 
Gottschall,  of  Elizabeth,  Dauphin  Co.,  Pennsylvania. 

Reuben  Achenbach  was  bom  near  Pine  Grove,  and  having  Jeamed  the  trade 
of  blacksmith  established  himself  in  business  in  the  borough,  being  so  engaged 
until  his  death,  June  24,  1905.  He  held  a  creditable  place  as  a  trustworthy 
citizen,  his  diligence,  honesty  and  straightforward  character  winning  him  the 
good  will  of  all  his  fellow  men.  He  married  Rebecca  Sotzin,  who  was  bom 
in  Pine  Grove,  daughter  of  Henry  Sotzin,  a  native  of  Switzerland,  who  came 
to  America  many  years  ago  and  settled  in  this  vicinity,  where  he  carried  on 
farming  until  his  death.  His  children  were:  Matthias,  Henry,  Samuel, 
Susanna,  Mary,  Elizabeth  and  Rebecca  (Mrs.  Achenbach),  all  now  deceased. 
Mrs.  Achenbach  died  Dec.  i,  1884.  She  was  the  mother  of  nine  children, 
namely:  Isaac,  a  wheelwright,  who  lives  at  Pine  Grove;  Mary  Ann,  wife  of 
F.  F.  Brommer,  of  Pine  Grove ;  Reuben,  of  Pine  Grove,  a  retired  blacksmith ; 
Daniel,  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  employed  as  a  blacksmith  by  the  Philadelphia  & 
Reading  Railway  Company;  Gregory;  Andrew,  who  died  young;  and  others 
who  died  in  infancy. 

Gregory  Achenbach  was  bom  in  1871  in  Pine  Grove  township,  was  reared 
near  the  borough,  and  began  his  literary  training  in  the  public  schools  there. 
After  graduating  from  high  school  in  1888,  he  entered  the  Keystone  State 
Normal  School,  at  Kutztown,  which  he  attended  in  1892,  obtaining  an  excellent 
education.  In  his  young  manhood  he  taught  school  for  eleven  terms  in  Pine 
Grove  township,  later  turning  his  attention  to  business.  He  had  a  bakery 
at  Pine  Grove  for  eighteen  years,  building  up  a  wide  trade  by  courteous 
treatment  of  his  patrons  and  solicitude  for  their  wants.  He  continued  the 
business  until  1913,  when  he  gave  it  up  in  order  to  devote  all  his  time  to  offi- 
cial responsibilities.  Mr.  Achenbach  was  first  elected  justice  of  the  peace  in 
1896,  before  he  gave  up  teaching,  and  has  filled  that  position  continuously 
since.    He  has  also  given  three  years'  service  on  the  board  of  school  directors. 


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ISO  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

and  in  every  trust  to  which  he  has  been  called  has  proved  his  fitness  and 
shown  himself  worthy  of  the  confidence  of  the  community. 

^  Mr.  Achenbach  has  niunerous  fraternal  affiliations,  belonging  to  Lodge 
No.  148, 1.  O.  O.  F.,  of  which  Ije  is  a  past  grand ;  to  the  Knights  of  the  Golden 
Eagle,  of  which  he  is  a  past  chief;  to  the  Independent  Americans;  and  to  the 
Royal  Arcanum,  of  which  he  is  a  past  regent 

On  May  25,  1889,  Mr.  Achenbach  married  Mary  E,  Lehman,  a  native  of 
Pine  Grove,  daughter  of  Isaac  and  Angelina  (Huber)  Lehman,  both  now 
deceased,  who  were  residents  of  Pine  Grove  in  pioneer  days.  Nine  children 
have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Achenbach,  viz. :  Laura  R.,  deceased ;  Mae 
E.;  Ahna  A.,  deceased;  Harvena  M.;  Arthur  A.;  Stanley  E.;  Lyman  I.; 
Grace  E. ;  and  Ruth  F.,  deceased.  The  family  home  is  an  attractive  residence 
on  the  main  street  of  the  borough.  * 

ELISHA  FILER,  Jr.,  of  Mahanoy  City,  has  made  a  wide  circle  of  ac- 
quaintances among  officials  and  lawyers  in  Schuylkill  county  during  his  sev- 
eral years'  experience  as  court  crier  and  law  librarian.  He  has  been  serving 
as  such,  by  appointment,  since  1909.  Mr.  Filer  is  a  native  of  Mahanoy  City 
and  his  early  life  was  quite  typical  of  Schuylkill  county,  having  been  spent 
in  work  at  the  anthracite  mines. 

Bom  July  13,  1870,  he  is  a  son  of  Elisha  Filer,  who  was  bom  in  Wales 
and  came  to  this  country  when  a  yomig  man.  Settling  at  Mahanoy  City, 
Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  he  followed  mining  for  a  number  of  years,  later  obtain- 
ing employment  with  the  Lehigh  Valley  Railroad  Company.  He  was  given 
charge  of  the  local  work  train,  and  still  fills  that  position. 

Elisha  Filer,  Jr.,  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Mahanoy 
City.  When  a  boy  of  nine  years  he  began  work  as  a  slate  picker  at  the 
breaker  of  what  is  now  the  Tunnel  Ridge  colliery,  under  John  Shipman,  who 
was  the  outside  foreman.  He  continued  mine  work  until  the  year  1905,  filling 
various  positions,  for  thirteen  years  in  the  capacity  of  coal  inspector  for  the 
Lehigh  Valley  Coal  Company.  Becoming  a  clerk  for  Harrison  Ball,  lumber 
and  hardware  dealer,  he  remained  with  him  three  years,  after  which  he  was  a 
clerk  in  the  employ  of  the  Lehigh  Valley  Coal  Company  at  Centralia,  Columbia 
Co.,  Pa.,  for  a  time.  Meantime  he  had  been  in  the  insurance  business  for 
eighteen  months.  In  1909  he  was  appointed,  by  Judge  Bmmm  and  ex- Judge 
Shay,  as  court  crier  and  librarian  at  the  courthouse  of  Schuylkill  county,  and 
has  served  creditably  in  that  capacity  ever  since.  He  also  maintains  his  office 
at  No.  334  East  Centre  street,  Mahanoy  City,  doing  considerable  busmess 
as  a  fire  insurance  agent  and  in  the  handling  of  real  estate;  he  represents 
several  of  the  old-line  insurance  companies.  Mr.  Filer  has  served  one  term 
as  school  director  of  the  borough,  and  has  also  been  borough  auditor,  and  m 
all  the  public  service  he  has  undertaken  has  made  a  most  creditable  record. 
In  political  activities  he  has  always  been  associated  with  the  Republican  party, 
and  one  of  its  most  reliable  workers  in  his  section  of  the  county.  He  holds 
membership  in  several  fratemal  bodies— Mahanoy  9^  Lodge,  No.  357,  F.& 
A  M  •  the  Jr  O  U.  A.  M. ;  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  and  the  local  lodge  of  B.  P.  O. 
Elks  *  He  also  belongs  to  the  Schuylkill  County  Historical  Society.  In  religious 
connection  he  is  a  Baptist,  and  in  all  his  associations,  busmess,  official,  social 
and  purely  personal,  he  has  the  unqualified  respect  of  his  fellows  as  an  all- 
around  good  citizen.  ^    ,  .    ^  .  "^i,  t-i-      t    1  • 

Mr.  Filer  has  been  twice  marned.    By  his  first  union,  with  Eliza  Jenkins, 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  761 

he  had  three  children,  Earle,  Myrtle  and  Wilbur.    After  their  mother's  death 
he  was  united  to  Lottie  Webb,  by  whom  he  has  one  son,  Paul  W. 

CHARLES  H.  MAY,  one  of  the  oldest  native-born  residents  of  Port 
Carbon,  is  now  living  retired.  In  former  years  he  was  associated  with  various 
activities  in  the  borough  of  a  public  nature  or  common  interest,  but  except 
for  his  work  in  the  United  Evangelical  Church  he  has  withdrawn  from  par- 
ticipation in  such  matters.  He  was  bom  Feb.  i6,  1845,  son  of  Philip  H.  May, 
a  native  of  Germany  who  came  to  America  in  young  manhood  and  was  an 
early  settler  at  P6rt  Carbon,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  died  at  the  age 
of  seventy-four  years.  He  is  buried  there,  in  the  Lutheran  cemetery.  Mr. 
May  followed  the  trade  of  carpenter.  He  had  six  children:  Charles  H., 
Sallie,  Rosie,  Mary,  Wesley  and  John. 

Charles  H.  May  received  his  education  in  Port  Carbon,  and  when  yet 
a  boy  began  work  in  a  sawmill.  He  learned  the  trade  of  machinist  in  the 
Boyer  establishment  at  Port  Carbon,  and  followed  it  for  about  forty-nine 
years  in  all,  for  many  years  in  the  shops  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Coal 
&  Iron  Company  at  Pottsville,  this  county.  A  few  years  ag^o  he  retired  to 
enjoy  well  earned  leisure.  Mr.  May  is  independent  on  political  questions, 
supporting  the  policies  he  likes  best  regardless  of  their  origin.  He  has  served 
three  years  as  borough  councilman.  During  the  Civil  war  his  sympathies  were 
with  the  Union,  and  in  1862  he  enlisted  in.  the  129th  Pennsylvania  Volunteer 
Infantry  for  nine  months'  service  (during  which  the  regiment  was  part  of  the 
State  militia),  participating  in  the  battles  of  Fredericksburg  and  Cnancellors- 
ville.  The  regiment  was  organized  in  August,  1862,  and  five  companies  were 
recruited  in  Schuylkill  county.  He  reenlisted  in  the  48th  Pennsylvania  Regi- 
ment, and  served  to  the  close  of  the  war;  in  front  of  Petersburg  he  was 
wounded  in  the  left  shoulder.  Mr.  May  was  a  charter  member  of  the  old 
Grand  Army  post  at  Port  Carbon,  and  he  is  now  a  member  of  Allison  Brothers 
Post,  No.  144,  of  his  borough,  of  which  he  has  been  commander.  He  was  an 
early  member  of  the  United  Evangelical  Church  at  Port  Carbon,  and  he  has 
been  a  class  leader  for  many  years,  still  serving  in  that  capacity,  and  also  as 
trustee.  For  many  yeai's  he  took  an  active  part  in  the  work  of  the  Sunday 
school. 

Mr.  May  married  Emma  L.  Krecker,  who  is  deceased.  They  became  the 
parents  of  the  following  children :  Fred,  Charles,  Raymond,  Harold,  Florence, 
Elsie,  Beulah  and  Olive,  the  last  named  deceased. 

DAVID  STARR,  of  Branch  township,  is  a  member  of  the  fourth  gener- 
ation of  his  family  in  Schuylkill  county,  and  in  intelligence,  good  citizenship 
and  other  worthy  qualities  a  typical  representative  of  the  name  he  bears. 
From  the  time  of  his  great-grandfather,  who  settled  in  Schuylkill  county 
when  he  came  to  this  country  from  Germany,  the  Starrs  have  been  counted 
among  its  most  useful,  substantial  residents,  thrifty  in  business  and  alive  to 
the  general  welfare,  showing  their  interest  in  public-spirited  service  to  their 
fellow  citizens  at  every  opportunity. 

Peter  Starr,  Sr.,  grandfather  of  David  Starr,  was  born  in  Schuylkill  county. 
He  learned  the  trade  of  tailor,  at  which  he  worked  in  Branch  and  Reilly  town- 
ships, and  was  a  well  known  man  in  that  section  in  his  day.  He  lived  to  the 
great  age  of  ninety-eight  years,  seven  months,  fifteen  days,  and  is  buried  in  the 
old  Frieden's  Church  cemetery  near  Llewellyn,  in  Branch  township.     His 


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762  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

children  were:  Abraham,  Peter,  Jr.,  John,  Jacob,  Elizabeth,  Susan,  Maria 
and  Catherine. 

Abraham  Starr,  father  of  David  Starr,  was  born  and  reared  in  Schuylkill 
county,  and  passed  all  his  life  here,  dying  when  sixty-eight  years  old.  He  is 
buried  in  the  cemetery  of  Frieden's  Oiurch.  He  always  worked  by  the  day. 
By  his  marriage  to  Rebecca  Zechman  he  had  a  large  family,  five  of  whom 
still  survive :    Charles,  William,  Jacob,  Abraham  and  David. 

David  Starr,  son  of  Abraham,  was  bom  Feb.  28,  1845,  at  Llewellyn,  in 
Branch  township.  When  but  six  years  old  he  came  to  the  place  where  he  has 
since  made  his  home,  the  farm  of  his  uncle,  Peter  Starr,  Jr.,  who  reared  and 
educated  him,  having  no  children  of  his  own.  David  Starr  remained  with  his 
uncle  until  the  latter's  death.  He  assisted  with  the  farm  work,  and  is  still 
engaged  in  cultivating  what  he  retains  of  the  tract,  having  sold  the  part  upon 
which  the  famous  Black  Diamond  colliery  is  situated.  In  his  uncle's  day  it 
was  worked  by  independent  operators,  but  it  is  now  owned  by  the  Philadelphia 
&  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Company. 

Mr.  Starr  is  one  of  the  best  loiown  men  in  his  locality.  The  efficient  man- 
agement he  gave  to  his  own  affairs  attracted  the  attention  of  his  neighbors  and 
business  associates  generally,  and  he  was  picked  as  a  desirable  candidate  for 
the  office  of  township  treasurer,  was  elected,  and  gave  g^eat  satisfaction  in  the 
performance  of  its  duties.  He  succeeded  his  uncle  Peter  as  supervisor  of 
Branch  township,  holding  that  office  six  months.  Mr.  Starr  has  been  a  prom- 
inent member  of  the  Reformed  Church,  and  has  filled  the  position  of  elder. 

By  his  marriage  to  Mary  M.  Henry,  Mr.  Starr  has  had  nine  children: 
Sarah  R.  is  unmarried ;  William  A.  is  in  the  hotel  business ;  Catherine  is  the 
wife  of  Fred  A.  Barras  and  lives  in  Boston,  Mass. ;  Jane  G.,  wife  of  Milton 
Starr,  lives  in  Branch  township ;  Samuel  O.  is  at  home ;  four  died  young. 

Peter  Starr,  Jr.,  the  uncle  by  whom  David  Starr  was  reared,  was  a  prom- 
inent resident  of  Branch  township,  well  known  in  and  around  the  town  of 
Llewellyn.  He  kept  store,  carried  on  a  huckster  business,  and  owned  a  farm 
of  one  hundred  acres,  much  of  which  proved  to  be  valuable  coal  land.  He 
was  also  in  the  timber  business,  and  was  successful  in  all  his  undertakings. 
He  and  his  wife  are  both  deceased. 

PETER  J.  SCHNEIDER,  of  Locustdale,  has  been  a  resident  of  Schuylkill 
county  for  thirty  years  and  has  become  one  of  the  substantial  business  men 
of  his  section.  As  postmaster  he  comes  into  contact  with  most  of  the  members 
of  the  community,  and  the  universal  respect  in  which  he  is  held  is  a  fair  indica- 
tion of  the  honorable  methods  which  have  characterized  all  his  dealings  with 
his  fellow  citizens. 

A  native  of  Germany,  Mr.  Schneider  was  bom  Aug.  24,  1864,  son  of  Frank 
W.  and  Catherine  (Utterbaugh)   Schneider.     The  mother  died  in  Germany,  ^ 
and  the  father  subsequently  came  to  America  with  three  sons  and  one  daugh- 
ter.    They  located  at  Ashland,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  the  father  died  in 
March,  1901. 

Peter  J.  Schneider  was  reared  and  educated  in  Germany,  where  he  lived 
until  twenty  years  old,  coming  to  this  country  with  his  father  in  the  year  1884. 
Previous  to  this  time  he  had  begun  work  in  the  mines,  and  he  followed  mine 
work  during  the  first  fifteen  years  of  his  residence  here  also.  He  had  accom- 
panied his  father  to  Ashland,  but  remained  there  only  a  short  time,  and  has 
since  been  at  Locustdale.    Some  fifteen  years  ago  he  embarked  in  business  as 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  76? 

a  general  merchant,  and  has  been  so  engaged  until  the  present  time,  having 
established  a  profitable  trade  by  obliging  attention  to  the  wants  of  his  custom- 
ers. In  19 1 3  he  was  appointed  postmaster,  in  which  office  he  has  been  giving 
highly  satisfactory  service.  Mr.  Schneider  has  proved  himself  a  man  of 
thoroughly  reliable  character,  and  is  trusted  unreservedly  by  his  fellow  men. 
In  1891  Mr.  Schneider  married  Elizabeth  Mellon,  of  Schuylkill  county, 
daughter  of  Joseph  and  Theresa  Mellon,  who  are  residents  of  this  county,  and 
six  children  have  been  bom  to  this  union :  Frank,  Anthony,  Marie,  Veronica, 
Elizabeth  and  Retta.  Mr.  Schneider's  religious  connection  is  with  the  German 
Catholic  Church. 

SIMON  HARTMAN,  a  merchant  of  Valley  View,  has  been  in  business 
since  he  settled  there,  in  1906,  and  has  built  up  a  profitable  trade  and  creditable 
reputation  by  dealings  which  stamp  him  as  being  worthy  of  the  confidence  of 
his  fellow  citizens.  He  is  a  native  of  Dauphin  county,  Pa.,  where  the  family 
has  been  known  and  respected  from  the  early  days.  His  grandfather,  Simon 
Hartman,  was  bom  at  Gratz,  that  county,  and  followed  farming  in  Dauphin 
county. 

Amos  Hartman,  father  of  Simon  Hartman,  was  bom  at  Gratz,  where  he 
farmed  throughout  his  active  years,  now  living  retired.  He  married  SalHe 
Paul,  a  native  of  Northumberland  county,  daughter  of  George  Paul,  who 
resided  near  Hemdon,  that  county,  until  his  death ;  he  was  a  mason  by  trade. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hartman  have  had  six  children,  namely:  Jennie,  the  eldest,  is 
the  wife  of  Maurice  Zerfing,  of  Gratz,  Pa. ;  Allen  is  a  farmer  at  Gratz ;  Wilson 
is  deceased ;  Simon  is  next  in  the  family ;  Sallie  and  Lloyd  are  at  home. 

Simon  Hartman  was  bom  at  Gratz,  Dauphin  county,  where  he  was  reared 
and  educated,  attending  the  public  schools.  After  he  undertook  his  own  sup- 
port he  lived  for  a  time  at  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  and  for  six  years  was  at  Chicago, 
111.,  in  the  service  of  the  Pullman  Company,  settling  at  Valley  View,  Schuylkill 
Co.,  Pa.,  in  the  year  1906.  Here  he  has  been  engaged  in  business  on  his  own 
account,  having  the  largest  and  best  assorted  stock  of  the  kind  in  the  town 
and  vicinity.  He  carries  a  well  selected  line  of  general  hardware  and  builders' 
supplies,  and  is  always  willing  to  give  customers  the  benefit  of  his  advice  as 
well  as  good  service,  his  accommodating  disposition  and  familiarity  with  his 
chosen  line  bringing  customers  from  all  over  this  part  of  the  county.  He  has 
become  identified  with  other  interests  in  the  town,  being  a  member  of  the  Val- 
ley View  Odd  Fellows  lodge,  and  has  earned  a  name  for  himself  among  the 
substantial  citizens  of  his  adopted  place. 

In  1910  Mr.  Hartman  married  Sallie  Klinger,  a  native  of  Gratz,  Dauphin 
county,  daughter  of  Tobias  and  Emma  (Shaflfer)  Klinger,  the  former  now 
deceased,  the  latter  still  a  resident  of  Gratz..  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hartman  have 
two  children,  Florence  and  Mae. 

GEORGE  BOND,  late  of  Tamaqua,  was  a  pioneer  blacksmith  of  that  place 
and  one  of  the  successful  business  men  of  his  day  there,  founding  many  years 
ago  the  establishment  which  is  still  conducted  by  his  son.  A  proficient  mechanic 
and  man  of  practical  executive  ability,  Mr.  Bond  combined  with  good  business 
qualities  an  admirable  personal  character  which  made  him  worthy  of  the 
esteem  of  his  fellow  citizens,  among  whom  he  occupied  for  many  years  an 
honorable  position. 

Mr.  Bond  was  bom  in  England  in  1826,  and  his  father,  John  Bond,  was 


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764  SCHUYLKILL  CXDUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

also  a  native  of  that  country.  The  latter  brought  his  family  to  America,  and 
first  settled  at  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  later  removing  to  Port  Clinton, 
same  county.  He  was  twice  married,  and  by  his  first  wife  had  one  son,  George. 
To  his  second  marriage  was  bom  a  daughter,  Angelia,  who  became  the  wife 
of  Dr.  George  Nice,  of  Port  Clinton. 

During  his  boyhood  George  Bond  attended  public  school  at  Tamaqua, 
making  his  home  there  with  his  cousin,  John  Bond.  For  a  time  he  lived  at 
Port  Clinton,  returning  to  Tamaqua  in  1847  ^"^  here  serving  his  apprentice- 
ship to  the  blacksmith's  trade,  which  was  his  life  work.  Starting  in  business 
on  his  own  account  when  yet  a  young  man,  he  built  up  a  wide  patronage  by 
reliable  work  and  honesty  in  all  his  transactions,  and  in  time  had  a  large  plant 
with  all  conveniences  for  first-class  work,  of  which  he  always  had  plenty. 
He  carried  on  the  establishment  until  his  death,  in  1900,  and  it  has  since  been 
operated  by  his  son  George.  George  Bond  is  buried  at  Tamaqua.  He  was  a 
member  of  the  local  Masonic  lodge,  No.  238,  and  of  the  Knights  of  Pythias, 
and  was  a  Presbyterian  in  religious  connection. 

On  March  24,  1851,  Mr.  Bond  married  Miranda  Boughner,  who  died  in 
1905.  The  following  children  were  bom  to  this  union:  John  C.  is  now  a 
resident  of  Montana;  Catherine,  deceased,  was  the  wife  of  John  Masterson; 
Emily  G.  lives  at  the  old  home  in  Tamaqua ;  William,  Albert  and  George  live  at 
Tamaqua,  the  last  named  continuing  the  business  his  father  established. 

Abraham  Boughner,  father  of  Mrs.  George  Bond,  lived  for  a  time  in  Rush 
to\irnship,  this  county,  later  settling  at  Tamaqua,  where  he  died.  He  served 
as  county  commissioner  in  the  later  thirties,  when  the  courthouse  was  located 
at  Orwigsburg.  Mr.  Boughner  married  Catherine  Fetter,  and  their  children 
were:  Mary  married  John  Brady,  who  was  a  contractor,  of  Philadelphia, 
Pa. ;  Catherine  married  Gideon  Wetstone ;  Caroline  married  Albert  Dewel,  of 
New  York  State;  Miranda  was  the  wife  of  George  Bond. 

JOHN  HERMAN  KEILMAN  is  considered  one  of  the  most  valuable 
citizens  of  Rush  township,  where  his  helpful  activity  in  all  good  works  has 
furthered  many  a  cause  for  the  general  welfare.  Public-spirited,  intelligent 
and  unselfish  in  devoting  his  efforts  to  conserving  the  best  interests  of  the 
community,  he  well  deserves  the  influential  position  he  enjoys  among  his 
neighbors  and  fellow  townsmen  generally. 

The  Keilman  family  is  of  German  descent.  John  Herman  Keilman,  Sr., 
father  of  John  Herman  Keilman,  Jr.,  was  bom  at  Hoenebach,  Germany,  and 
came  to  America  in  young  manhood,  in  1855.  Locating  at  Mahanoy  City, 
Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  he  followed  mining  for  a  number  of  years,  and  in  1871 
settled  in  Rush  township,  where  he  had  purchased  a  farm.  It  was  all  bush 
land  then,  but  he  cleared  it  and  devoted  the  remainder  of  his  life  to  its 
cultivation,  dying  Feb.  20,  1888.  He  is  buried  at  Mahanoy  City.  His  wife, 
whose  maiden  name  was  Susanna  Young,  was  a  native  of  Suess,  Germany, 
and  came  to  America  on  the  same  ship  as  Mr.  Keilman,  whom  she  afterwards 
married.  She  is  now  living  at  Allentown,  Pa.,  with  her  daughter  Mrs.  Weil. 
Children  as  follows  were  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  John  Herman  Keilman,  Sr.: 
Margaret,  who  is  now  the  wife  of  Rev.  J.  G.  Steinert,  a  Reformed  minister; 
Mary,  married  to  John  A.  Weil,  of  Allentown ;  Susan,  wife  of  William  Moeller, 
of  Philadelphia,  Pa.;  Dora,  who  married  Alphinous  Gouldner,  and  died  in 
Detroit,  Mich,  (she  is  buried  at  Mahanoy  City)  ;  and  John  Herman. 

John  Herman  Keilman  was  born  Dec.  31,  1870,  at  Mahonoy  City,  Schuyl- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  765 

kill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  was  a  young  child  when  the  family  settled  on  the  farm  in 
Rush  township.  There  he  spent  his  boyhood,  received  his  education  in  the 
public  school  at  Bamesville,  and  was  early  trained  to  farming,  which  he  has 
followed  most  of  his  life.  However,  during  his  young  manhood  he  held  the 
position  of  assistant  postmaster  at  Bamesville,  was  assistant  station  agent 
there,  and  also  clerked  in  a  store,  spending  four  years  thus.  He  married  in 
1898  and  then  took  upon  himself  the  operation  of  his  father's  farm,  renting  it 
first  and  buying  the  property  Feb.  22,  1907.  It  consists  of  fifty-two  acres 
located  near  Bamesville,  and  under  his  systematic  care  has  increased  steadily 
in  value,  being  now  one  of  the  best  cultivated  tracts  in  the  vicinity.  Mr.  Keil- 
man  has  given  his  work  the  strict  attention  necessary  to  make  it  prosper,  but 
he  has  also  found  time  for  other  interests,  and  he  is  one  of  the  men  who  have 
assisted  in  bettering  local  conditions  and  endeavored  to  put  township  affairs 
upon  a  solid  basis.  He  has  served  four  years  as  member  of  the  school  board, 
of  which  he  was  vice  president  for  six  months  and  is  now  secretary ;  for  three 
years  he  was  a  clerk  on  the  election  board,  chosen  by  the  Democratic  party; 
for  twelve  years  he  has  been  a  deacon  of  Christ  Reformed  congregation,  and 
he  is  secretary  of  both  the  Reformed  and  Evangelical  Lutheran  congregations 
which  worship  at  Christ  Church.  He  has  always  taken  an  active  part  in  its 
enterprises,  and  for  many  years  was  one  of  the  energetic  workers  in  the 
Sunday  school.  Socially  he  belongs  to  the  Patrons  of  Husbandry,  having  been 
a  charter  member  of  Lakeside  Grange,  No.  1418,  which  he  helped  to  oi^nize. 
His  cooperation  is  always  sought  in  any  cause  which  has  for  its  object  the 
promotion  of  local  interests. 

On  March  16,  1898,  Mr.  Keilman  was  married,  in  Iowa,  to  Anna  L. 
Scherer,  daughter  of  Calvin  and  Tillie  (Merely)  Scherer,  and  six  children 
have  been  bom  to  them :  Mabel  E. ;  Roy  H. ;  Ruth  D.  and  Mildred  C,  twins ; 
John  Harold,  and  Elmer  L. 

JOHN  R.  DOLBIN,  of  Minersville,  is  a  descendant  of  an  old  Schuylkill 
county  family,  founded  here  by  his  grandfather,  Goodman  Dolbin,  who  came 
from  Wales. 

Goodman  Dolbin  lived  at  Minersville,  Pa.,  for  a  short  time  after  his  arrival 
in  Pennsylvania.  He  then  removed  to  what  is  now  known  as  Forestville,  a 
small  village  in  Cass  township,  and  was  a  pioneer  at  that  place.  He  was  a  man 
of  energetic  character,  well  fitted  for  leadership  in  promoting  the  development 
of  a  young  community,  having  a  progressive  disposition  and  plenty  of  initiative. 
He  was  one  of  the  pioneer  independent  coal  operators  there,  and  in  that  busi- 
ness was  in  partnership  for  a  time  with  David  Rodgers,  under  the  firm  name 
of  Dolbin  &  Rodgers.  Some  of  their  contemporaries  who  had  small  operations 
in  the  locality  were  Robert  Patten,  Thomas  Lloyd,  William  Britton  and  a 
Mr.  Bristow.  Mr.  Dolbin  took  an  interest  in  all  the  affairs  of  the  locality,  and 
was  one  of  the  organizers  of  St.  Stephen's  Episcopal  Church  of  Forestville. 
Before  its  establishment  the  people  of  that  faith  walked  to  Pottsville  to  divine 
services.  Mr.  Dolbin  died  at  his  ^home  in  Forestville,  and  is  buried  in  the 
Union  cemetery  at  Minersville.  He  married  Mary  Thomas,  and  they  reared 
a  large  family,  having  become  the  parents  of  nine  children,  namely:  John, 
^ho  married  Elizabeth  Robertson;  Robert,  who  married  Caroline  Groom; 
David,  who  married  Harriet  Groom;  Margaret,  Mrs.  Samuel  Taylor;  Annie, 
Mrs.  WiUiam  Moore ;  Elizabeth,  Mrs.  Edward  Griffith ;  Jennie,  who  married 


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766  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

John  Woolcock,  of  PottsviUe;  Mary,  Mrs.  Richard  Brennan;  and  Sarah,  who 
lives  with  her  sister  Mrs.  Woolcock. 

John  Dolbin,  son  of  Goodman  Dolbin,  was  bom  in  1835  ^^  Minersville, 
Schuylkill  county.  He  lived  at  Forestville  from  the  early  days  of  that  town, 
and  in  1876  engaged  in  the  mercantile  business  at  that  place.  For  many  years 
he  was  also  a  mining  contractor,  afterwards  becoming  an  engineer  at  the  col- 
lieries. He  retired  about  six  years  before  his  death,  which  occurred  in  1903, 
and  he  is  buried  beside  his  father  in  the  Union  cemetery,  at  Minersville.  Like 
his  father  John  Dolbin  was  one  of  the  foremost  citizens  of  Cass  township, 
highly  respected  for  his  useful  life  and  his  public  spirit  in  furthering  the 
interests  of  the  community.  In  1857  he  married  Elizabeth  Robertson,  a  native 
of  Scotland,  daughter  of  John  Robertson,  who  was  an  uncle  of  the  late 
Andrew  Robertson,  a  prominent  coal  operator  in  the  anthracite  fields.  Mrs. 
Dolbin,  now  past  eighty  years  of  age,  continues  to  reside  in  the  old  homestead 
at  Forestville.  She  is  known  to  all  the  residents  of  that  district,  and  held  in 
affectionate  esteem  by  her  many  friends.  Seven  children  were  bom  to  Mr.  and 
Mrs.  Dolbin,  namely :  Mary,  the  wife  of  Archie  Dunlop,  of  Forestville,  who 
has  three  children,  John  R.,  Nelson  R.  and  William  R. ;  John  R.,  who  is  men- 
tioned below;  Andrew  R.,  bom  April  28,  1871 ;  William,  deceased;  Goodman, 
deceased;  James,  living  at  home;  and  George,  of  Minersville,  who  married 
Mary  Jenkins  and  has  had  three  children,  Elizabeth,  George,  and  one  deceased. 
Of  this  family  Andrew  R.  Dolbin, was  employed  at  the  mines  until  twenty-one 
years  old,  and  then  for  four  years  followed  the  trade  of  blacksmith.  He  has 
since  been  carrying  on  a  wholesale  liqudr  business  at  Forestville,  and  makes 
his  home  there,  living  with  his  aged  mother.  He  has  never  married.  Mr.  Dol- 
bin is  a  vestryman  of  the  Episcopal  Church,  of  Forestville,  and  one  of  the 
prominent  citizens  of  that  town. 

John  R.  Dolbin  was  bom  Nov.  29,  i860,  at  Forestville,  Cass  township,  and 
had  such  educational  advantages  as  the  local  public  schools  afforded.  Like 
most  boys  of  the  coal  region  he  began  work  when  very  young,  being  only 
eight  years  old  when  he  started  to  work  at  the  mines,  where  he  was  employed 
until  he  reached  his  majority.  He  then  went  to  Mount  Carmel,  Northumber- 
land Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  became  engaged  in  the  grdcery  business,  meeting  with 
success  in  this  line,  in  which  he  continued  for  twenty-two  years.  Retuming 
to  his  old  home  at  Forestville  some  time  ago,  he  became  interested  with  his 
brother  Andrew  in  the  wholesale  liquor  business,  and  they  are  engaged  as 
bottlers  as  well  as  dealers.  Mr.  Dolbin  is  an  able  business  man  and  his  various 
ventures  have  prospered  under  his  careful  management.  Like  all  representa- 
tives of  his  family  he  is  a  citizen  of  recognized  worth,  and  holds  a  substantial 
position  in  his  home  town. 

Mr.  Dolbin  married  Amelia  Hoffman,  by  whom  he  had  a  family  of  seven 
children,  namely:  Elizabeth,  deceased;  William,  deceased;  Clyde,  at  home; 
Andrew,  deceased ;  Florence,  deceased ;  Donald,  who  is  a  student  at  the  State 
College,  Pa. ;  and  Mary,  deceased.  For  his  second  wife  Mr.  Dolbin  married 
Ida  Morgans,  and  to  this  union  also  have  been  bom  seven  children,  namely: 
Delroy,  who  is  at  home ;  Margaret ;  George,  deceased ;  James,  at  home ;  Ken- 
neth, deceased ;  and  Elizabeth  and  Florence  L.,  both  at  home. 

HENRY  C.  KREIS,  of  Middleport,  Schuylkill  county,  is  a  man  of  solid 
standing  in  business  circles  and  held  in  the  highest  respect  for  his  personal 
qualities,  which  have  gained  him  the  favor  and  good  will  of  his  associates  in 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  767 

all  the  relations  of  life.  He  is  a  native  of  Schuylkill  county,  bom  Jan.  23, 
1863,  at  Brockton,  son  of  Henry  C.  and  Charlotte  (Schlimmer)  Kreis. 

The  parents  were  both  natives  of  Germany,  the  father  bom  in  Kreissau- 
briicken,  Pmssia.  He  was  a  youth  of  about  eighteen  years  when  he  came  to 
America,  and  first  settled  in  the  Tumbling  Run  valley,  in  Schuylkill  county, 
Pa.,  where  he  did  farm  work.  Later  he  went  to  Coal  Hill  and  followed  mining 
for  a  time,  thence  removing  to  Patterson,  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  was 
engaged  in  the  hotel  business  for  three  years.  From  there  he  came  to  Middle- 
port,  where  he  also  had  a  hotel,  carrying  it  on  for  twenty  years.  His  death 
occurred  at  Middleport  when  he  was  forty-seven  years  old,  and  he  is  buried 
in  the  Lutheran  cemetery  there.  To  his  marriage  with  Charlotte  Schlimmer 
were  bom  the  following  children :  Peter,  Charlotte,  Dorothy,  Sophia,  Henry 
C,  William  and  Mary. 

Henry  C.  Kreis  acquired  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Middleport. 
His  early  years  were  spent  in  mine  work.  He  began  picking  slate  at  the  Palmer 
vein  colliery,  and  later  did  different  kinds  of  work  about  collieries,  until  he 
received  the  appointment  of  health  officer  of  the  713  district,  which  includes 
Blythe  township,  Schuylkill  county.  After  filling  this  position  capably  for 
five  years  he  determined  to  start  in  business  on  his  own  account,  and  in  19 10 
he  opened  the  store  at  Middleport  which  he  has  since  carried  on,  having  a 
good  stock  of  general  merchandise  and  commanding  his  full  share  of  the  local 
patronage.  His  store  is  up-to-date  in  every  particular  and  his  customers  receive 
prompt  attention  and  first-class  service,  of  which  ,they  have  shown  their  appre- 
ciation in  a  very  substantial  manner. 

Aside  from  business ^Mr.  Kreis  has  been  interested  in  a  number  of  local 
enterprises.  He  is  serving  as  president  of  the  Citizens'  Fire  Company,  No.  i, 
of  Middleport ;  for  the  last  twenty  years  he  has  been  secretary  of  the  P.  O.  S. 
of  A.  camp  in  the  borough ;  for  the  last  ten  years  secretary  of  the  Odd  Fellows 
lodge  there ;  and  he  also  holds  membership  in  the  B.  P.  O.  Elks  at  Tamaqua. 
Politically  he  has  been  associated  with  the  Republican  party,  and  for  six  years 
he  held  the  office  of  tax  collector  at  Middleport.  Every  good  movement  there 
receives  his  hearty  support. 

Mr.  Kreis  married  Emma  Singley,  daughter  of  John  and  Sarah  (Yost) 
Singley.  They  have  no  children.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Kreis  are  members  of  the 
Lutheran  Church. 

AARON  STRUBHAR  is  occupying  the  place  at  Suedberg,  in  Pine  Grove 
township,  whfere  he  was  bom,  and  he  belongs  to  an  old  family  of  Swiss  origin 
which  was  planted  in  Pennsylvania  in  the  early  days. 

John  George  Strephauer,  the  first  of  his  ancestors  to  come  to  America, 
was  bom  in  Switzerland.  On  his  arrival  in  this  country  he  first  lived  in  Berks 
county.  Pa.,  thence  moving  to  what  is  now  Suedberg,  Schuylkill  county,  where 
he  bought  a  farm  upon  which  he  resided  for  many  years.  It  was  the  property 
where  his  great-grandson,  Aaron  Strubhar,  now  lives,  and  his  son  George, 
grandfather  of  Aaron,  built  the  house  which  the  latter  occupies.  The  great- 
grandfather and  grandfather  were  both  lifelong  farmers,  and  they  died  at 
Suedberg,  where  they  are  buried.  They  were  the  parents  of  two  children. 
George  Strephauer  was  bom  in  Berks  county. 

John  Strubhar,  son  of  George,  was  bom  in  the  house  on  the  farm  which 
his  father  built  July  31,  1819,  and  lived  to  the  age  of  eighty-one  years,  dying 
Feb.  9,  1901.    Throughout  his  life  he  was  engaged  in  farming  and  prospered 


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768  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

in  his  work.  Mr.  Strubhar  married  Mary  Reed,  who  was  bom  March  2,  1820, 
in  Berks  county,  Pa.,  died  Feb.  18,  1886,  and  is  buried  in  the  cemetery  at 
Suedberg.  She  was  one  of  the  large  family  bom  to  Jacob  Reed,  a  farmer,  at 
one  time  living  in  Berks  county,  whence  he  removed  to  Schuylkill  county  in  an 
early  day,  settling  in  Pine  Grove  township.  He  died  at  Suedberg.  Mr.  Reed 
belonged  to  a  large  family.  Of  the  three  children  bom  to  Mr.  and  lllrs.  John 
Strubhar  Aaron  is  the  only  one  now  living. 

Aaron  Stmbhar  was  bom  Dec.  10,  1842,  was  reared  at  his  birthplace,  and 
has  been  engaged  in  farming  there  ever  since  he  began  work.  He  has  been 
highly  successful,  and  the  thrifty  condition  of  his  property  shows  that  he  has 
spared  neither  thought  nor  effort  to  achieve  results.  Wherever  his  interests 
have  called  him  among  his  fellow  men  his  worthy  character  has  called  forth 
expressions  of  respect  and  confidence  from  his  associates.  He  has  been  elected 
school  director  and  tax  collector  of  his  district,  and  discharged  the  duties  of 
both  offices  acceptably.  He  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  Church  of  God,  and 
is  serving  the  congregation  as  trustee  and  elder.  He  was  a  charter  member 
of  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  camp  at  Suedberg,  held  the  position  of  treasurer  for 
eleven  years,  and  has  been  chaplain  and  senior  vice  commander  of  Wolf  Post, 
G.  A.  R.,  of  Pine  Grove,  where  he  is  very  popular  with  his  Civil  war  comrades. 
He  enlisted  from  Suedberg  during  1865  in  Company  F,  93d  Pennsylvania 
Volunteer  Infantry,  under  Colonel  Heckman,  and  remained  in  the  service  to 
the  close  of  the  war,  being  mustered  o|it  at  Washington,  D.  C,  in  June,  1865. 
He  was  wounded  at  Petersburg,  March  25,  1865. 

In  1862  Mr.  Stml^har  married  Anna  R.  Reed,  and  the  following  children 
have  been  bom  to  them:  Mary  D.,  the  eldest,  is  now  the  wife  of  Charles 
Christenson,  of  Annville,  Lebanon  Co.,  Pa.;  Iva  E.  is  the  wife  of  Alorris 
Krickbaum,  of  Pine  Grove  township ;  Lyman  E.  is  a  resident  of  Palmyra,  Pa. ; 
Harvey  lives  at  home;  George,  the  youngest,  is  at  Pottstown,  Montgomery 
Co.,  Pennsylvania. 

Mrs.  Strubhar  was  bom  near  Orwigsburg  in  Schuylkill  county,  daughter  of 
Daniel  and  Esther  (Faust)  Reed,  both  natives  of  this  county,  the  former  bom 
near  Orwigsburg,  the  latter  at  Llewell)rn.  They  had  three  children,  Thomas  F. 
still  living  on  the  old  homestead  of  his  parents;  Phoebe  Ann  is  the  wife  of 
Joseph  Conard,  of  Kansas.  Thomas  Reed,  Mrs.  Stmbhar's  grandfather, 
settled  near  Orwigsburg,  and  died  at  Friedensburg,  this  county.  He  was  a 
farmer  by  occupation.  His  wife  also  died  at  Friedensburg,  where  they  are 
buried. 

ROBERT  CHARLES  BRAUN,  of  Pottsville,  has  exercised  an  appreciable 
influence  upon  musical  culture  in  this  part  of  Pennsylvania  in  bringing  possi- 
bilities of  musical  enjoyment  into  the  lives  of  local  communities  and  first-class 
instruction  to  ambitious  students. 

Born  in  Port  Carbon,  Pa.,  Feb.  18,  1886,  he  is  a  son  of  Charles  T.  Brown, 
cashier  of  the  Pennsylvania  National  Bank  of  Pottsville,  and  a  descendant 
of  Johannes  Braun,  of  Wurtemberg,  Germany,  who  came  to  America  and 
settled  in  Pennsylvania,  near  McKeansburg.  The  great-grandfather's  son, 
Charles  Maul  Braun,  came  to  Pottsville,  and  he  changed  the  spelling  of  the 
name  to  Brown,  as  C.  T.  Brown  writes  it.  Robert  Charles  takes  the  original 
form  Braun.  Charles  T.  Brown  married  Sarah  Frances  Pugh,  who  was  of 
Welsh  descent  and  a  fine  contralto  singer.  Robert  Braun  was  brought  to 
Pottsville  when  one  year  old.    His  mother  died  when  he  was  five  years  old. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  769 

leaving  him  with  a  brother,  Edgar  D.,  one  year  old.  The  father  and  two 
sons  then  lived  with  Frederic  Gerhard,  an  uncle  by  marriage,  from  1891  until 
the  father  married  again,  in  1904. 

It  is  to  Frederic  Gerhard  that  Mr.  Braun  owes  all  of  his  early  teaching  and 
inspiration.  Under  Gerhard  he  studied  violin  at  the  age  of  six ;  took  up  piano 
in  his  seventh  year,  and  continued  with  Mr.  Gerhard  until  sixteen,  receiving 
a  thorough  grounding  in  technic  and  ensemble  playing.  The  Beethoven  piano 
and  violin  sonatas  were  daily  bread.  He  made  a  tour  through  Pennsylvania 
at  the  age  of  eleven  as  a  "boy  wonder."  In  his  fourteenth  year  he  played  piano 
in  theatre  orchestra,  later  double  bass,  and  became  a  member  of  the  Third 
Brigade  Band.  He  learned  a  number  of  orchestral  and  military  band  instru- 
ments, studying  saxophone  with  Fredinand  Paul,  of  Sousa's  Band,  and  oboe 
with  Max  Lachmuth,  of  Philadelphia,  and  Doucet  of  the  Paris  Conservatoire. 
In  the  summer  of  19 12  he  was  oboe  soloist  with  the  AUentown  Band. 

Mr.  Braun  was  a  graduate  in  the  honor  division,  class  of  1904,  Pottsville 
high  school,  class  prophet,  organized  the  High  School  Glee  Club  in  1902,  and 
composed  the  high  school  marches  for  1901,  1902,  1903,  1904.  He  also  com- 
posed the  march  accepted  for  the  Pottsville  Old  Home  Week  Centennial,  1908, 
and  arranged  all  of  these  for  military  band  and  orchestra. 

In  1902  Mr.  Braun  went  to  Philadelphia  weekly  to  study  piano  under 
Constantin  von  Sternberg,  technic  under  Mattie  B.  Moulton,  and  theory  under 
G.  A.  A.  West,  also  boy  choir  training.  He  studied  pipe  oi^n  with  S.  H. 
Unger,  and  occupied  an  organ  position  with  the  English  Lutheran  Church, 
Pottsville,  from  1903  until  1905.  He  was  then  appointed  organist  and  choir- 
master of  Trinity  Episcopal  Church,  Pottsville,  which  had  a  boy  choir  of 
sixty-five.  Under  his  direction  they  gave  the  St.  Cecilia  Mass  by  Gounod. 
In  1905  he  taught  private  pupils  in  Pottsville ;  played  Beethoven  and  Schumann 
Concertos  in  Wither  spoon  Hall,  Philadelphia,  in  1905-06.  In  1907  he  opened 
the  Reading  branch  of  the  Sternberg  School  of  Music. 

In  the  spring  of  1909  Mr.  Braun  sailed  for  Europe,  traveling  through  Italy, 
Switzerland  and  Germany  with  his  teacher  and  friend — Constantin  von  Stem- 
berg,  in  the  summer.  Then  he  entered  the  ROyal  Conservatory  of  Music  in 
Leipzig,  exempt  from  technic,  under  Teichmuller,  piano  (finishing  class),  and 
Schreck,  theory,  received  his  certificate  the  following  Easter,  and  left  for 
Vienna  to  study  with  Godowsky,  but  arrived  too  late  in  the  year.  Besides 
studying  with  Pugno,  while  he  was  concertizing  in  Leipzig,  Mr.  Braun  made 
weekly  trips  to  Berlin  to  study  systematic  memorizing  with  Vernon  Spencer. 
After  touring  through  France  and  England  he  returned  to  America  in  the  fall 
of  1910.  He  remained  in  Philadelphia  until  the  spring  of  191 1,  going  on 
short  concert  tours  through  the  State;  received  an  appointment  as  oi^nist 
and  choirmaster  of  St.  Philip's  Episcopal  Church,  Forty-second  street  and 
Baltimore  avenue.  West  Philadelphia ;  and  shortly  after  began  to  make  weekly 
visits  to  Pottsville  to  teach  a  few  private  pupils.  This  was  the  beginning 
of  the  Braun  School  of  Pianoforte  Playing  first  conducted  in  his  home,  at  No. 
805  West  Market  street.  It  was  not  long  before  the  school  grew  to  such 
proportions  as  to  warrant  an  assistant.  In  June,  1912,  the  school  was  moved 
to  the  old  Whitney  building,  formerly  occupied  by  the  Pottsville  Club,  Nos. 
223-225  South  Centre  street.  Its  name  was  changed  to  "The  Braun  School 
of  Music,"  and  violin  and  vocal  departments  were  added.  This  was  the  first 
school  of  its  kind  organized  in  this  section,  and  at  present  has  a  faculty  of 
twelve  instructors. 
Vol.  11—11 


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770  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

At  this  time  Mr.  Bratin  opened  a  studio  in  the  Greble  building  at  Philadel- 
phia, and  later  moved  to  the  Estey  building,  at  Seventeenth  and  Walnut 
streets,  where  a  branch  of  his  school  was  established.  In  June,  191 3,  a 
thrifty  branch  was  opened  in  Minersville  and  in  November  of  the  same  year 
a  branch  was  opened  in  Reading.  At  the  death  of  Professor  Gerhard,  Oct.  7, 
1913,  he  was  appointed  conductor  of  the  Gerhard  Symphony  Orchestra.  He 
has  been  conductor  of  the  Pottsville  Liederkranz  since  1912,  and  of  the 
lamaqua  Maennerchor  since  1914. 

On  Monday,  Jime  16,  1913,  Mr.  Braim  married  Miss  Frances  Zerbey, 
daughter  of  J.  H.  Zerbey,  proprietor  and  editor  of  the  Pottsville  Republican, 
Mrs.  Bratm  is  a  talented  violinist,  and  she  was  the  first  woman  to  be  admitted 
to  the  bar  of  Pennsylvania  as  a  full-fledged  lawyer.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Braun 
reside  at  Fifteenth  street  and  Howard  avenue,  Pottsville.  He  is  a  member 
of  the  Outdoor  Club,  Pottsville  Club  and  Rotary  Club,  of  Pottsville ;  of  the  ^ 
Musical  Art  Qub  and  Philadelphia  Sketch  Club,  both  of  Philadelphia;  and  of 
the  English  lAitheran  Church,  Pottsville. 

JONATHAN  BULL,  Sr.,  bears  a  name  which  has  been  respected  in  Port 
Carbon  for  three  quarters  of  a  century  and  more.  His  father,  Ross  Bull,  was 
one  of  the  leading  citizens  of  the  borough  in  his  day.  Mr.  Bull's  grandfather 
lived  near  Springfield,  Chester  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  died.  By  occupation  he 
was  a  blacksmith. 

Ross  Bull  came  to  Port  Carbon  at  an  early  day  and  here  followed  his  trade 
of  shoemaker.  He  was  one  of  the  most  effective  workers  at  the  time  of  the 
organization  of  the  borough,  in  1852,  was  honored  with  election  as  its  first 
chief  burgess,  and  later  was  elected  justice  of  the  peace,  filling  that  office  for 
many  years.  He  was  also  major  of  the  State  militia  at  Port  Carbon.  He 
assisted  in  founding  the  Methodist  Church  here  and  was  one  of  its  most 
faithful  officials,  serving  as  choir  leader  and  for  many  years  was  superintend- 
*ent  of  the  Sunday  school.  His  death,  which  occurred  Dec.  10,  1892,  was 
regarded  as  a  loss  to  the  entire  community.  He  is  buried  in  the  Presbyterian 
cemetery  at  Port  Carbon.  Mr.  Bull  married  Maria  Garis,  a  native  of  Berks 
coimty.  Pa.,  who  was  the  mother  of  a  large  family,  namely :  Thomas  G.,  who 
was  one  of  the  "First  Defenders'*  during  the  Civil  war;  Sarah,  wife  of  Charles 
Morgan;  Jonathan;  Maria,  who  died  young;  William;  Martha,  who  married 
James  Hess  and  (second)  Ed.  Seddon;  Philip;  Margaret,  who  married  William 
Fry  and  (second)  Ed.  Thomas;  James;  George;  Oiarles;  Lillie,  who  married 
Thomas  Nichols ;  and  Mary,  who  married  Harry  DeHaven. 

Jonathan  Bull,  Sr.,  was  bom  Oct.  21,  1839,  at  Port  Carbon,  where  he  was 
reared  and  educated.  During  his  boyhood  he  worked  for  a  short  time  at  the 
coal  breaker.  In  1855  he  started  to  learn  the  trade  of  molder  at  Port  Carbon 
and  served  twenty-one  months,  after  which  he  went  to  work  for  his  father 
at  shoemaking.  In  1859  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Lehigh  Valley  Railroad 
Company  in  Easton,  Pa.,  as  a  blacksmith,  remaining  there  about  eighteen 
months,  and  enlisted  at  that  town  in  Company  C,  ist  Pennsylvania  Regiment, 
upon  the  first  call  for  troops  at  the  breaking  out  of  the  Civil  war.  Under  this 
enlistment  he  served  three  months.  In  1862,  on  the  emergency  call,  he  enlisted 
in  the  4th  Pennsylvania  Regiment,  under  Colonel  Litzinger  and  Capt.  B.  L. 
Eshelman,  and  served  as  second  sergeant.  On  his  third  enlistment  he  became 
a  member  of  Company  A,  39th  Pennsylvania  Regiment,  in  which  he  was  third 
sergeant.    Later  he  enlisted  in  the  7th  Pennsylvania  Cavalry  of  the  Twenty- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  771 

fourth  ward,  Philadelphia,  and  he  received  his  last  discharge  Aug.  23,  1865. 
Returning  home  after  the  war,  Mr.  Bull  in  1866  entered  the  employ  of  the 
Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company  at  St.  Qair,  Schuylkill  county,  and 
he  remained  in  its  service  for  the  long  period  of  forty-three  years,  six  months, 
being  retired  in  1909  with  a  pension.  He  has  since  been  spending  his  days  in 
leisure  at  Port  Carbon.  Mr.  Bull  has  never  taken  any  active  part  in  public 
affairs,  but  he  has  been  an  interested  worker  in  AlHson  Brothers  Post,  No.  144, 
G.  A.  R.,  of  Port  Carbon,  and  is  a  past  official  of  that  organization. 

On  June  6,  1863,  Mr.  Bull  married  Amanda  Maria  Kailey,  daughter  of 
Seteriah  Kailey,  of  Schuylkill  county.  On  June  6,  1913,  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Bull 
had  the  pleasure  of  celebrating  the  golden  anniversary  of  their  wedding,  and 
on  that  occasion  entertained  ninety-six  relatives  at  their  home  in  Port  Carbon. 
Their  children  are  all  living,  namely :  Margaret,  Mrs.  WilHam  Major;  Thomas 
W.,  who  is  a  resident  of  Huntington,  W.  Va. ;  Ross,  of  Port  Carbon ;  Jonathan, 
Jr.,  of  Port  Carbon ;  James,  of  Port  Carbon ;  Elizabeth,  Mrs.  Robert  Hamilton  ; 
Ida,  Mrs.  A.  L.  Fletcher;  Carrie,  Mrs.  Samuel  Reeber;  Frederick,  Howard 
and  Amanda,  the  last  three  at  home.  The  family  are  Methodists  in  religious 
connection. 

PAUL  WOLFGANG  has  been  a  lifelong  resident  of  Hegins  township  ano 
is  operating  a  well  established  business  at  Valley  View,  where  he  has  carried 
on  a  prosperous  trade  in  the  manufacture  and  repair  of  wagons  for  a  period 
of  forty  years.  His  grandfather,  Jonas  Wolfgang,  was  a  farmer  in  the  Mahan- 
tongo  valley,  in  this  section  of  Schuylkill  county,  many  years  ago,  and  there 
John  Wolfgang,  father  of  Paul,  was  bom. 

John  Wolfgang  also  followed  farming  most  of  his  life.  He  moved  eventu- 
ally into  the  town  of  Valley  View,  where  he  piu-chased  the  home  which  he 
occupied  until  his  death.  He  was  in  the  Union  army  during  the  latter  part  of 
the  Civil  war,  serving  from  Hegins  township.  He  married  Sophia  Upde- 
grave,  who  was  bom  in  Hubley  township,  this  county,  where  her  father,  Henry 
Updegrave,  passed  all  his  life.  He  was  a  farmer  and  shoemaker  by  occupa- 
tion. Mrs.  Wolfgang  died  at  Valley  View,  in  the  house  where  her  son  Paul 
now  lives. 

Paul  Wolfgang  was  bom  in  Hegins  township,  where  he  was  reared  and 
educated,  attending  the  public  schools.  During  his  boyhood  and  early  youth 
he  did  farm  work,  and  he  learned  his  trade  with  Jacob  Wolfgang.  For  a  short 
time  after  completing  his  apprenticeship  he  remained  working  for  Mr.  Wolf- 
gang, but  he  commenced  working  on  his  own  account  over  forty  years  ago, 
and  during  all  that  time  has  been  engaged  principally  in  the  manufacture  of 
wagons.  He  has  become  known  as  an  all-around  reliable  mechanic  in  his  line, 
and  the  long  continued  patronage  of  many  of  his  customers  is  sufficient  to 
show  their  appreciation  of  his  thorough  workmanship.  Personally,  he  enjoys 
the  same  high  standing  in  all  his  associations.  He  is  a  tmstee  of  the  United 
Brethren  Church,  of  which  he  and  his  wife  are  devoted  members. 

When  twenty-one  years  old  Mr.  Wolfgang  married  Catherine  Schwalm,  a 
native  of  Hegins  township,  this  county,  where  her  parents,  Samuel  and  Eliza- 
beth (Klinger)  Schwalm,  were  also  bom.  Mr.  Schwalm  was  a  farmer.  He 
was  a  Civil  war  veteran,  having  been  a  captain  in  the  50th  Regiment,  Penn- 
sylvania Volunteer  Infantry.  He  is  survived  by  Mrs.  Schwalm,  who  is  now 
(191 5)  eighty-six  years  old.  Four  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
Wolfgang:     Isabella,  the  eldest,  is  now  the  wife  of  William  Troutman,  of 


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772  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Hegins  township;  Amelia  is  married  to  J.  G.  Romberger,  a  miller,  of  H^ns 
township;  Mary  is  the  wife  of  John  Rickert,  of  Valley  View;  Clara  is  the 
wife  of  Charles  M.  UnderkofBer,  of  Valley  View. 

Charles  M.  Underkoffler,  son-in-law  of  Paul  Wplfgang,  was  reared 
and  educated  in  Valley  View,  and  is  now  doing  business  there  in  association 
with  his  father-in-law,  Mr.  Wolfgang,  being  a  wheelwright  by  calling.  He 
learned  the  trade  at  Valley  View.  He  is  well  and  favorably  known  in  this 
section,  a  leading  member  of  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  camp  of  the  town,  which  he 
is  at  present  serving  in  the  capacij:y  of  treasurer. 

SAMUEL  QUICK,  of  Butler  township,  bought  the  farm  he  now  occupies 
thirty  years  ago,  and  has  been  devoting  his  time  to  its  cultivation  with  very 
satisfactory  results.  With  the  exception  of  five  years  in  California,  during 
his  early  manhood,  he  has  passed  his  life  in  Schuylkill  county,  and  by  wisely 
directed  energy  he  has  become  one  of  the  well-to-do  agriculturists  of  his 
section. 

Bom  March  13,  1842,  at  Pottsville,  Mr.  Quick  is  a  son  of  Samuel  and 
Maria  (Stephens)  Quick,  natives  of  England,  who  came  to  this  country  in 
1837.  At  that  time  they  had  one  child.  Locating  first  in  Philadelphia,  Pa., 
they  subsequently  removed  to  Pottsville,  Pa.,  Mr.  Quick  being  a  miner  by 
.  occupation.  Thence  they  removed  to  Ashland,  this  county,  where  Mr.  Quick 
remained  until  his  death.  His  wife  died  in  California  while  visiting  her 
son  Samuel.  Of  the  children  bom  to  Samuel  and  Maria  Quick,  fourteen  in  all, 
only  two  survive,  James  and  Samuel,  the  former  a  resident  of  Columbia  county. 

In  1856  Samuel  Quick  accompanied  his  father  to  Ashland,  where  he  spent 
the  next  few  years.  Reared  and  educated  at  Pottsville,  he  began  work  in  the 
mines  when  a  boy,  and  was  thus  engaged  for  some  time.  In  i860  he  went  out 
to  California,  where  he  spent,  about  five  years,  returning  to  Schuylkill  county 
in  1865.  Becoming  engaged  in  teaming  in  Girardville,  this  county,  he  contin- 
ued to  follow  that  occupation  until  1882.  In  1884  he  bought  his  present  farm 
in  Butler  township,  which  he  has  operated  continuously  since.  His  industry 
and  systematic  attention  to  its  cultivation  have  been  well  rewarded,  and  his 
useful  life  has  earned  him  the  regard  of  all  who  know  him. 

In  1867  Mr.  Quick  was  married  to  Ann  Harlan,  who  was  bom  at  Centralia, 
Columbia  county,  where  her  parents  resided.  Thirteen  children  have  been 
bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Quick,  of  whom  eight  survive,  five  sons  and  three 
daughters :  Samuel,  living  at  home ;  William,  of  Mahanoy  City,  this  county ; 
Aaron,  of  Ashland;  Hannibal,  of  Mahanoy  City;  John,  located  at  Harrisburg; 
Maria,"of  Pottsville,  wife  of  John  Trout;  Anna  Jane,  married  to  R.  Seitzinger; 
and  Sallie,  wife  of  Gustav  Klase. 

JOHN  IFFERT,  late  of  Rush  township,  was  in  his  day  one  of  the  foremost 
citizens  in  that  part  of  Schuylkill  county.  His  high  character  made  him  uni- 
versally respected,  and  his  industrious  life  brought  him  prosperity,  the  sub- 
stantial reward  of  thrift  and  energy  well  directed. 

Mr.  IflFert  was  a  German  by  birth  and  grew  to  manhood  in  his  native  land, 
coming  to  America  at  the  age  of  nineteen  years.  During  most  of  his  residence 
in  this  country  he  was  a  citizen  of  Schuylkill  county,  Pa.,  first  settling  at 
Tamaqua.  While  there  he  followed  mining,  at  which  he  was  also  employed 
after  his  removal  to  Wilkes-Barre,  Pa.  Later  he  was  engaged  in  farming  at 
Wilkes-Barre,  whence  he  removed  to  Locust  Valley,  in  Ryon  township,  Schuyl- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  773 

kill  county,  remaining  there  one  year.  He  then  bought  the  Neifert  homestead 
in  Rush  township,  this  county,  a  tract  of  about  sixty-five  acres,  where  he  passed 
the  rest  of  his  life,  dying  there  April  13,  1905.  Mr.  Iffert  was  buried  in  the 
cemetery  of  the  White  Church,  in  which  congregation  he  had  been  an  active 
worker,  having  served  as  deacon  for  thirty  years. 

In  Tamaqua  Mr.  Iffert  married  Martha  Vurburg,  who  was  bom  in  Ger- 
many and  came  to  America  when  twenty-one  years  old,  and  she  survived  her 
husband,  passing  away  Sept.  9,  1914,  at  the  age  of  eighty-one  years.  She  is 
also  buried  at  the  White  Church,  in  Rush  township.  The  following  children 
were  bom  to  this  worthy  couple:  (i)  William,  who  is  engaged  in  business 
as  a  merchant  at  Tamanend,  tWs  county,  married  Louisa  Zimmerman,  and  they 
have  three  children,  Jacob,  Susan  and  Annie.  (2)  Mary  married  Henry 
Hauck,  and  is  living  at  Tamanend.  They  have  had  two  children,  Frederick 
and  Clarence,  both  deceased.  (3)  Henry,  now  a  resident  of  Hazleton,  Pa., 
married  Elizabeth  Bauchman,  and  their  children  are  Adam,  Harry,  Florence, 
Clayton,  Irene,  Walter  and  Helen.  (4)  Christine  is  the  wife  of  Henry  Krouse, 
of  Ryon  township,  and  has  children,  Gertrude,  John  and  Martha.  (5)  John 
F.  P.  is  proprietor  of  the  **Stone  Tavern*'  in  Rush  township.  He  married 
Ella  Gearhart,  and  their  children  are  Bessie  and  Elmer.  (6)  Conrad  is  a  fore- 
man in  the  Bethlehem  steel  plant.  He  married  Emma  Herring,  but  they  have 
no  children.  (7)  Amnie  is  the  wife  of  Martin  Fritz.  (8)  Martha  married 
Thomas  Keams  and  has  three  children.  Earl,  Harold  and  Mildred.  They  live 
in  Philadelphia. 

Martin  Fritz,  who  now  owns  and  occupies  the  old  homestead  of  his  father- 
in-law,  John  Iffert,  in  Rush  township,  was  bom  Sept.  22,  1876.  His  father, 
Henry  Fritz,  lived  and  died  at  Locust  Valley,  in  Ryon  township,  and  worked 
by  the  day.  He  married  Angeline  Bankes,  who  also  died  there,  and  they  were 
the  parents  of  a  large  family:  Malinda,  Henry,  Frank,  Joseph,  Jane,  Lucy, 
Annie,  Martin,  Alvin  and  Gabriel. 

Martin  Fritz  had  ordinary  common  school  advantages  in  his  boyhood  and 
was  trained  to  farm  work  from  his  youth.  At  an  early  age  he  b^an  to  work 
for  John  Iffert,  by  whom  he  was  employed  for  seventeen  years,  a  fact  which 
speaks  well  for  his  capability  and  diligence,  which  were  much  appreciated  by 
Mr.  Iffert.  He  and  his  wife  now  own  the  Iffert  homestead,  'which  they  occupy, 
and  he  gives  all  his  time  to  farming,  in  which  he  has  met  with  unusual  success. 
He  is^held  in  high  esteem  by  his  neighbors  and  friends  everywhere.  Mr.  Fritz 
is  a  member  of  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  but  he  pays  little  attention  to  affairs  outside 
of  his  home  interests. 

Mr.  Fritz  married  Annie  Iffert,  daughter  of  John  Iffert,  and  three  children 
have  been  bom  to  them :    Oarence,  Arthur  and  H.  Russell. 

ALBERT  L.  MOSER  has  an  up-to-date  farm  and  home  in  Union  town- 
ship and  is  considered  one  of  the  most  enterprising  agriculturists  of  that  sec- 
tion. He  belongs  to  an  old  family  of  Berks  county.  Pa.,  and  his  ancestors  for 
generations  have  been  prosperous  farmers. 

William  Moser,  grandfather  of  Albert  L.  Moser,  was  bom  in  Albany 
township^  Berks  county,  where  he  spent  all  his  life.  He  farmed  a  tract  of 
150  acres.  The  Mosers  are  Lutherans,  and  he  belonged  to  St.  Jacob's  Church 
at  Jacksonville,  which  is  just  across  the  line  in  Lehigh  county.  He  took  an 
active  p^irt  in  its  work,  and  he  and  his  wife  are  buried  there.  In  politics  he 
became  u  Republican  when  the  tum  in  national  affairs  drew  him  into  sympathy 


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774  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

with  the  principles  of  that  party.  His  wife's  maiden  name  was  Kuntz,  and 
they  had  the  following  children:  James,  deceased,  a  farmer  and  miller  in 
North  Union  township,  Schuylkill  county,  who  married  Cordelia  Wanamaker 
(she  lived  at  AUentown,  Pa.)  ;  Thomas,  deceased;  Charles;  William  K. ;  Albert, 
who  died  when  about  twenty  years  old;  Ellen;  Mi.ry;  Kate;  Sarah;  Amanda; 
and  Lucy. 

William  K.  Moser,  father  of  Albert  L.  Moser,  was  born  in  Albany  town- 
ship, Berks  county,  near  the  Lehigh  county  line,  and  attctided  school  in  Lehigh 
county.  He  followed  agriculture  and  sawmilling,  having  two  farms  in  Albany 
township,  and  lived  to  be  about  sixty-seven  years  old.  Like  his  father  he  was 
a  very  zealous  member  of  St.  Jacob's  Lutheran  Church  at  Jacksonville,  and  a 
Republican  in  his  political  convictions.  He  married  Sarah  Lutz,  who  was 
also  bom  in  Albany  township,  where  her  family  were  farming  people,  and 
she  died  in  1913,  when  about  seventy-one  years  old.  Mr.  atul  Mrs.  Moser  are 
buried  at  St.  Jacob's  Church.  They  had  children  as  follow^:  William,  who 
married  Carrie  Stroup,  lives  at  Chester,  Pa.;  Edward  married  Mabel  Christ 
and  lives  at  Steinsville,  Pa. ;  Robert,  married  to  Anna  Colver,  is  living  at  Read- 
ing, Pa.;  Albert  L.  is  next  in  the  family;  Lena  is  the  wife  of  Francis  Keller, 
of  Reading;  Clara  is  married  to  Lewis  Lenhart,  of  Reading:  Nellie  and  Daisy 
also  live  in  Reading. 

Albert  L.  Moser  was  bom  May  12,  1874,  in  Albany  township,  Berks  county, 
and  obtained  his  schooling  at  the  neighboring  town  of  Steinsville,  across  the 
line  in  Lehigh  county.  Up  to  the  age  of  twenty  years  he  {^ave  his  services 
to  his  father  at  home,  and  after  that  worked  one  year  on  the  home  place  for 
wages.  Then  for  nearly  a  year  he  was  in  the  employ  of  his  uncle,  lames  Moser, 
at  Zion  Grove,  in  North  Union  township,  Schuylkill  county,  and  for  the  three 
years  following  was  a  tenant  on  his  uncle's  farm,  which  he  operated  on  shares. 
Buying  a  farm  from  Fred  Hosier,  he  settled  at  Zion  Grove  attd  followed  gen- 
eral farming  on  his  own  account,  having  a  tract  of  102  acr*-  ,  of  vyijhich  all 
but  twenty  were  cleared.  For  eleven  years  he  continued  to  'opt  rate  that  place, 
which  he  then  rented  for  two  years,  on  shares,  at  the  end  of  that  lime  selling 
it  to  Cyms  Moyer.  In  March,  191 1,  Mr.  Moser  bought  his  present  farm  in 
Union  township  from  Nathan  Fitzgibbons,  and  he  has  been  livinjr  there  since 
and  devoting  his  time  to  its  cultivation.  At  the  time  he  purchased  the  place 
it  comprised  213  acres,  of  which  113  acres  were  cleared,  the  balance  covered 
with  sprouts,  and  he  has  sold  fifty-four  acres  of  the  sprout  land  to  the  Girard 
Estate  Water  Company.  His  cleared  land  is  planted  in  general  crop?,  and  he 
has  been  especially  successful  in  growing  potatoes,  cabbages  and  other  vege- 
tables. He  attends  market  at  Shenandoah.  Mr.  Moser  has  made  remarkable 
progress  in  the  improvement  of  the  property  during  the  few  years  it  has  been 
in  his  possession.  He  has  remodeled  the  dwelling,  and  equipped  it  with  all  the 
modem  conveniences,  running  water,  hot  water  heat,  gaslight,  etc.,  and  he  has 
been  equally  enterprising  about  putting  the  other  buildings  into  excellent  shape, 
everything  about  the  place  being  kept  in  the  good  condition  which  he  has  found 
to  be  profitable  economy.  His  fellow  citizens  availed  themselves  of  his  serv- 
ices for  different  purposes,  and, he  served  them  very  efficiently  as  road  com- 
missioner. He  is  a  Republican  and  was  much  interested  in  politics,  taking 
an  active  part  in  local  elections,  at  which  he  served  as  judge  and  inspector.  He 
belongs  to  the  Mount  Zion  Lutheran  Church  at  Zion  Grove,  in  North  Union 
township,  aqd  was  one  of  the  deacons. 

When  twenty  years  old  Mr.  Moser  was  married  to  Millie  Geneva  Oswald, 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  775 

who  was  born  Sept.  3,  1877,  at  Lynnport,  Lehigh  county,  where  she  was  brought 
up  and  educated.  She  lived  at  home  until  her  marriage.  Like  her  husband 
she  is  a  member  of  the  Mount  Zion  Lutheran  Church.  They  are  the  parents  of 
five  children:  George  Raymond,  bom  March  28,  1895;  Pearl  Cleo,  May  26, 
1900;  Ralph  Lewis,  Oct.  22,  1902;  May  Ella,  Jan.  10,  1910;  and  Olive  Oswald, 
Dec.  22,  191 1.  They  are  all  still  at  home.  George  was  educated  in  the  John- 
son school  at  Zion  Grove,  and  the  others  have  attended  in  Union  township. 

Samuel  Oswald,  grandfather  of  Mrs.  Moser,  was  bom  at  Lynnport,  Lehigh 
Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  farmed  all  his  life,  living  to  seventy-four  years  of  age. 
His  wife,  whose  maiden  name  was  Catherine  Fetherolf,  died  when  seventy- 
one  years  old^  and  they  were  the  parents  of  four  children :  Edward,  who  is 
deceased;  Lewis;  Kate,  wife  of  Charles  Kressley,  of  Jacksonville,  Lehigh 
Co.,  Pa.;  and  Mary,  living  at  Jacksonville.  The  parents  are  buried  at 
St.  Jacob's  Reformed  Church,  and  Mr.  Oswald  was  an  active  member  of  that 
organization.     Politically  he  was  a  Republican. 

Lewis  Oswald  was  bom  Sept.  12,  1842,  at  Lynnport,  where  he  grew  to 
manhood  and  received  his  education.  He  worked  on  the  farm  for  his  father 
until  twenty  years  of  age,  was  married  two  years  later,  and  became  a  well 
known  farmer  and  merchant  of  that  locality,  bu)ring  a  farm  of  over  one  hun- 
dred acres  at  Lynnport,  where  he  also  had  a  general  store  and  served  for  many 
years  as  postmaster.  After  conducting  his  farm  and  store  for  a  number  of 
years  he  sold  out,  and  though  he  is  now  doing  a  little  huckstering  is  prac- 
tically retired.  He  is  a  stanch  Republican  in  politics,  and  a  member  of  St. 
Jacob's  Reformed  Church  at  Jacksonville,  where  he  and  his  wife  attend  serv- 
ices. Mr.  Oswald  married  Mary  Ann  Faust,  who  was  bom  April  12,  1843, 
in  Albany  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  and  they  have  a  family  of  five  children : 
Charles  Samuel,  who  is  now  carrying  on  his  father's  old  business  at  L)mn- 
port,  married  Messina  Smith;  Ellen  Jane  is  the  wife  of  Wilson  Werley,  of 
Bemville,  Berks  county;  Lena  Alice  is  married  to  Nathaniel  Shearer,  of 
Lynnport;  Millie  Geneva  is  the  wife  of  Albert  L.  Moser;  Cora  Mamie  is  tl^ 
wife  of  William  Mader,  of  Roscoe,  South  Dakota. 

Charles  Faust,  Mrs.  Oswald's  father,  was  a  farmer  in  Albany  township, 
owning  a  large  tract  of  land,  and  spent  all  his  life  in  that  section.  He  and 
his  wife  are  buried  at  the  New  Bethel  Church  in  that  township,  and  he  was 
one  of  the  leading  workers  in  the  Reformed  congregation  of  that  church.  In 
political  faith  he  was  a  Republican.  He  married  Mary  Ann  Zettlemoyer,  and 
their  children  were:  Amandus,  who  married  Eliza  Trexler;  Albert,  who 
married  Malinda  Sechler;  James,  who  married  Kate  Christ;  Sarah,  Mrs.  Elias 
Fetherolf;  Cordelia,  Mrs.  Isaac  Deisher;  Ellen,  Mrs.  Obediah  Shuler;  Malinda, 
Mrs.  John  Hunsicker;  Jeanetta,  Mrs.  Samuel  Loy;  Mary  Ann,  Mrs.  Lewis 
Oswald;  and  Mrs.  Isaac  Smith. 

THOMAS  A.  FARRELL  is  one  of  the  popular  residents  of  Middleport, 
where  he  is  serving  his  fellow  citizens  at  present  in  the  capacities  of  post- 
master and  justice  of  the  peace.  Mr.  Farrell  belongs  to  the  third  generation 
of  his  family  resident  at  that  place,  his  grandfather,  James  Farrell,  having 
settled  there  in  1845. 

James  Farrell  was  a  native  of  County  Carlow,  Ireland,  and  in  1832  landed 
at  Quebec,  Canada.  From  there  he  went  to  Steuben  county,  N.  Y.,  and  in 
1844  settled  at  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  did  not  remain  long, 
removing  thence  to  Middleport,  where  he  made  his  permanent  home.     By 


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776  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

trade  he  was  a  butcher,  but  he  did  not  follow  that  calling  long,  working  at  the 
mines  after  locating  at  Middleport.  He  died  there  in  1878,  at  the  age  of 
seventy  years.  His  children  were:  Matthew,  James  T.,  Andrew,  John  and 
William.  Of  these,  James  T.  Farrell  became  a  member  of  Company  E,  of 
the  famous  48th  Regiment  of  Pennsylvania,  and  was  wounded  in  the  second 
battle  of  Bull  Run,  dying  in  the  Eighth  Street  hospital,  at  Washington,  D.  C, 
Sept.  25,  1862.  He  is  buried  at  Port  Carbon,  this  county.  His  nephew,  Thomas 
A.  Farrell,  has  in  his  possession  several  letters  that  he  wrote  home  during  his 
service  in  the  army, 

Andrew  Farrell,  son  of  James  Farrell,  was  bom  in  Steuben  county,  N.  Y., 
and  came  to  Schuylkill  county  with  his  parents.  He  was  a  mine  worker  all 
his  life,  employed  at  the  Big  Vein,  and  made  his  home  at  Middleport,  where 
he  died  June  16,  1910.  His  brother  William  died  June  i8th,  and  they  were 
buried  at  New  Philadelphia,  in  one  grave.  Andrew  Farrell  married  Catherine 
Muldowney,  who  survived  him  nearly  five  years,  passing  away  Feb.  21,  1915, 
and  is  buried  at  New  Philadelphia.  Nine  children  were  bom  to  this  marriage : 
James,  Mary,  Thomas  A.,  William,  Ellen,  Sarah,  Lucy  C.  (deceased),  Andrew 
and  Matthew. 

Thomas  A.  Farrell  was  bom  Nov.  28,  1876,  at  Middleport,  and  attended 
the  public  schools  of  Blythe  township.  When  a  boy  he  began  picking  slate 
at  the  Big  Vein  breaker,  where  he  was  employed  for  twenty-six  years  in  all, 
during  sixteen  years  of  that  time  having  charge  of  the  lamps.  He  also  ran 
a  pump  and  hoisting  engine  there.  In  1914  he  made  a  change,  taking  his  pres- 
ent position  at  the  Maryd  colliery.  Mr.  Farrell  has  always  maintained  an 
interest  in  local  affairs,  working  zealously  in  the  furtherance  of  good  move- 
ments, and  he. has  been  active  in  the  Democratic  p^rty,  in  whose  councils  he 
has  served  as  committeeman.  In  191 1  he  was  elected  justice  of  the  peace,  and 
on  Oct.  13,  1913,  he  was  appointed  postmaster  at  Middleport,  continuing  to 
fill  both  positions,  in  which  he  has  given  general  satisfaction  by  his  conscientious 
attention  to  their  duties.  In  his  various  associations  he  has  made  numerous 
friends  in  his  section  of  Schuylkill  county. 

Mr.  Farrell  married  Rose  E.  Gallagher,  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Mary 
(Tolan)  Gallagher,  and  they  have  had  two  children,  Andrew  and  Thomas; 
Andrew  died  Nov.  4,  19 15. 

ANDREW  W.  HUBER,  of  Pine  Grove,  is  one  of  a  numerous  family  whose 
members  have  shown  themselves  worthy  of  the  high  regard  in  which  they  are 
held  in  that  boroueh.  He  is  a  native  of  Pine  Grove,  bom  July  4,  1844,  son 
of  Isaac  and  Elizabeth  (Minnick)  Huber  and  grandson  of  John  Huber,  one 
of  the  pioneers  of  this  sectk)n.  By  occupation  John  Huber  was  a  farmer. 
Washington  Huber,  a  resident  of  Harrisburg,  Pa.,  is  now  the  only  survivor 
of  his  family  of  ten  children,  viz.:  John,  Jacob,  Isaac,  William,  Jefferson, 
Washington,  David,  Mary,  Rachel  and  Sarah. 

Isaac  Huber  was  bom  in  1817  in  Pine  Valley,  Schuylkill  county,  and  died 
Oct.  24,  1896,  in  Pine  Grove,  at  the  age  of  seventy-nine  years.  He  was  en- 
gaged at  mine  work  near  that  borough.  His  wife,  Elizabeth  (Minnick),  was 
bom  Feb.  15,  1820,  in  Schuylkill  county,  and  reached  the  ag^e  of  ninety-two 
years,  dying  July  9,  1912.  She  was  a  daujp^hter  of  John  Minnick,  also  a  native 
of  Schuylkill  county,  a  wheelwright  and  farmer,  who  was  the  father  of  eight 
children,  Mrs.  Huber's  brothers  and  sisters  being:  John,  Jonathan,  Henry  (a 
half  brother),  Dena,  Barbara,  Kate  and  Mary  (a  half  sister)  ;  Henry,  Barbara 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  777 

and  Mary  are  still  living.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Isaac  Huber  were  bom  the  fol- 
lowing children:  Andrew  W. ;  William  A.,  who  died  Nov.  ii,  191 1 ;  Isaac  A., 
a  resident  of  Tremont,  Schuylkill  county;  Mary,  deceased,  who  was  the  wife 
of  William  Heimbach;  Lilla,  widow  of  George  W.  Stuckey,  of  Harrisburg; 
Ellen,  wife  of  Walter  Miller,  of  Omaha,  Nebr. ;  and  Laura,  widow  of  Edward 
Zimmerman,  of  Bristol,  Pennsylvania. 

Andrew  W.  Huber  was  reared  and  educated  at  Pine  Grove,  and  upon  leav- 
ing school  began  work  at  the  mines.  For  a  number  of  years  he  was  employed 
by  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Company  in  different  capacities,  for  several 
years  before  his  retirement  being  engaged  as  engineer  at  one  of  the  collieries. 
For  thirteen  years  he  held  the  position  of  loader  boss  at  the  Lincoln  colliery. 
During  the  last  few  years  he  has  been  living  in  comparative  retirement,  enjoy- 
ing well  earned  rest  after  a  life  of  steady  industry  and  conscientious  attention 
to  duty.    He  is  serving  as  janitor  of  the  Pine  Grove  borough  annex  school. 

In  June,  1863,  Mr.  Huber  enlisted  from  Pine  Grove  in  Company  H,  3Qth 
Pennsylvania  Volunteer  .Infantry,  under  Col.  James  Nagle,  and  after  serv- 
ing that  term  reenlisted,  in  August,  1864,  joining  Company  G,  7th  Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry,  with  which  he  served  to  the  close  of  the  war.  His  command 
was  attached  to  the  Army  of  the  Cumberland,  and  he  participated  in  eight 
important  battles:  Vinnings  Station,  Gra. ;  Columbia,  Oct.  i,  1864;  Rome,  Ga. ; 
Leeds  Cross  Roads,  Nov.  i,  1864;  Bardstown,  Ky.,  Dec.  29,  1864;  Selma,  Ala.; 
Columbia,  Ga.,  April  16,  1865;  and  Macon,  Ga.,  May  5,  1865.  He  was  dis- 
charged at  Nashville,  Tenn.,  June  23,  1865,  by  reason  of  the  close  of  the  war, 
and  returned  to  his  home  and  his  work,  proving  his  good  citizenship  as  much 
in  his  private  life  as  in  his  military  service.  He  is  th^  present  commander  of 
Wolf  Post,  No.  203,  G.  A.  R.,  of  Pine  Grove;  has  l>een  a  member  of  the 
P.  O.  S.  of  A.  since  1869;  and  belongs  to  the  Independent  Order  of  Ameri- 
cans. He  has  served  his  fellow  citizens  at  Pine  Grove  on  the  board  of  health, 
of  which  he  is  still  a  member.  For  fourteen  years  Mr.  Huber  was  a  member 
of  the  famous  Huber  Band  of  Pine  Grove,  which  had  fourteen  Hubers  in  its 
membership.  He  has  been  quite  prominent  in  the  local  Evangelical  Church, 
which  he  has  served  as  trustee,  and  his  wife  also  belongs  to  that  congregation. 

On  Nov.  3,  1866,  Mr.  Huber  married  Lizzie  A.  Berger,  a  native  of  Wayne 
township,  this  county,  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Eva  (Auman)  Berger  and 
granddaughter  of  Henry  and  Elizabeth  (Mumbeck)  Berger,  who  lived  in 
Williamsport,  Pa.  Henry  Berger  died  there,  his  wife  passing  away  near 
Reading,  Pa.  They  had  two  children,  Daniel  and  Mary,  both  now  deceased. 
Daniel  Berger  was  bom  in  this  section,  possibly  in  Wayne  township,  and  died 
Oct.  24,  1907,  when  eighty-two  years  old.  He  was  a  plasterer,  and  also  owned 
a  farm.  His  wife,  Eva  (Auman),  was  born  in  this  section  of  Schuylkill  county, 
and  died  Feb.  11,  1859.  She  was  a  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Elizabeth  (GoHff) 
Auman,  who  had  a  family  of  eight  children:  Eva,  Mrs.  Berger:  Jacob;  Solo- 
mon ;  Gabriel ;  Hannah ;  Kate ;  Julia,  and  Harriet.  To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Daniel 
Berger  were  bom  six  children :  Mrs.  Huber ;  Levi,  of  Pottsville,  Pa. ;  Henry, 
of  Lisbon,  Iowa;  Rebecca,  the  wife  of  Samuel  Mangle,  of  Auburn,  Pa.;  Ella, 
wife  of  Henry  Zweizig;  and  Mary,  widow  of  Frank  Burkhiser,  living  in  the 
State  of  Indiana. 

To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Huber  have  been  bom  two  children:  (i)  Agnes,  the 
eldest,  is  the  wife  of  Frank  Harvey,  of  Pine  Grove,  and  they  have  two  children. 
Myrtle  and  Olive ;  Myrtle  is  the  wife  of  Howard  Hughes,  of  Pine  Grove,  and 
they  have  one  son,  Luther;  Olive  is  the  widow  of  Harry  Christ.    (2)  Gertmde 


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778  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANLV 

is  the  widow  of  Peter  Hehn,  who  was  a  hotelkeeper  of  Landing^ville,  this 
county,  and  has  two  children,  Agnes  (wife  of  John  Peiffer,  of  Auburn)  and 
Robert.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hubert  have  a^lso  raised  an  adopted  son,  Benjanun  H., 
who  still  lives  at  Pine  Grove ;  he  married  Lillie  Stabler,  of  Cressona,  and  they 
have  two  children,  Ruth  M.  and  Paul  A. 

SAMUEL  MOORE  has  been  a  lifelong  resident  of  Schuylkill  county,  and 
since  September,  1909,  has  been  stationed  at  Port  Carbon  as  superintendent 
of  the  mines  of  the  Port  Carbon  Coal  Company,  independent  operators.  He 
has  been  a  mine  worker  from  boyhood,  is  thoroughly  familiar  with  the  busi- 
ness, and  is  widely  and  favorably  known  in  that  connection  all  over  the 
county. 

Mr.  Moore  was  bom  Aug.  14,  1873,  ^^  Tremont,  Schuylkill  county,  son  of 
Richard  Moore,  a  native  of  England,  who  has  lived  in  this  coimtry  since  two 
years  old.  Mr.  Moore  began  picking  slate  at  the  North  Franklin  colliery  in 
boyhood,  and  eventually  became  a  full-fledged  miner,  following  this  work  for  a 
period  of  twenty-eight  years.  He  then  gave  up  mine  work,  moving  to  Philadel- 
phia, Pa.,  where  he  is  now  employed  at  the  Midvale  Steel  works.  He  married 
Harriet  Faust,  daughter  of  the  well  known  Samuel  Faust,  and  member  of  a 
family  which  has  long  been  prominent  in  the  southern  part  of  Schuylkill  county, 
and  they  became  the  parents  of  the  following  children :  Samuel,  Mary,  Emma, 
Sadie,  Elizabeth,  Minnie,  William  and  Edward  (who  died  in  infancy). 

Samuel  Moore  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of  Tremont  and 
Minersville,  this  county.  His  first  work  was  picking  slate  at  the  Lincoln 
colliery.  After  a  time  he  became  pumpman  and  engineer,  and  when  com- 
petent was  promoted  to  foreman,  his  first  position  of  that  kind  being  at  the 
Crystal  Run  colliery,  where  he  remained  for  nine  years.  In  September,  1907, 
he  came  to  Port  Carbon,  where  he  took  charge  of  the  mines  of  the  Port  Car- 
bon Coal  Company,  operated  by  Slattery  Brothers.  They  ship  a  very  fine 
grade  of  coal,  and  the  works  are  ranked  among  the  most  successful  in  this 
district.  The  development  of  the  workings  has  gone  forward  steadily  under 
Mr.  Moore's  efficient  management,  and  the  highly  satisfactory  conditions  which 
prevail  at  the  mines  are  credited  to  his  ^ood  judgment  and  superior  executive 
ability.  Since  assuming  his  present  duties  Mr.  Moore  has  made  his  home  at 
Port  Carbon,  where  he  has  many  friends.  Formerly  he  resided  at  Frack- 
ville,  this  county,  and  he  was  considered  one  of  the  most  valuable  citizens  of 
that  borough,  where  he  served  his  fellow  citizens  as  councilman  for  nine 
years,  and  had  the  honor  of  being  president  of  the  council.  Fraternally  he 
holds  membership  in  the  Jr.  O.  U.  A.  M.  and  the  Royal  Arcanum.  The  family 
are  Lutherans  in  religious  connection. 

Mr.  Moore  married  Carrie  Reber,  daughter  of  William  Reber,  of  Schuyl- 
kill county,  and  children  as  follows  have  been  bom  to  this  marriage :  Harriet, 
George,  Oair,  Olive,  Mary,  Ruth,  and  Harvey. 

JOHN  F.  HANNEY  has  been  a  prosperous  blacksmith  of  Pottsville,  Pa., 
for  over  twenty  years,  having  combined  skillful  workmanship  with  excellent 
business  methods  in  acquiring  a  profitable  patronage.  He  and  his  brother  are 
doing  business  together  under  the  style  of  Hanney  Brothers,  and  their  estab- 
lishment, at  No.  551  North  Centre  street,  is  well  equipped  for  prompt  atten- 
tion to  all  customers. 

The  Hanney  brothers  are  sons  of  John  Hanney,  a  native  of  County  Galway, 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  779 

Ireland,  who  was  a  young  man  when  he  came  to  America  and  settled  in  Nor- 
wegian township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  near  Pottsville.  The  father  followed 
mining  throughout  his  active  years.  He  became  very  well  known  in  this  part 
of  Schuylkill  county,  having  served  his  township  for  thirty  years  as  tax  col- 
lector, and  he  also  held  the  county  office  of  jury  commissioner,  giving  the 
public  good  service  in  both  capacities.  Politically  he  was  a  Democrat.  He 
and  his  wife,  Mary  (Cumings),  died  at  their  home  in  Norwegian  township. 
They  had  the  following  children :  Catherine,  Patrick,  Sarah,  Thomas,  Martin, 
Edward  J.,  John  F.  and  Mary. 

Edward  J.  Hanney,  son  of  John,  above,  was  bom  at  the  homestead  in 
Norwegian  township  in  1863,  and  worked  at  the  mines  for  several  years  before 
learning  the  blacksmith's  trade,  beginning  as  a  slate  picker.  He  learned  his 
trade  with  Joseph  Schablein,  with  whom  he  remained  two  and  a  half  years, 
and  in  1892  he  engaged  4n  business  with  his  brother,  John  F.  Mr.  Hanney 
has  been  prominent  in  local  affairs,  particularly  as  a  member  of  the  township 
school  board,  on  which  he  has  served  for  twenty-five  years,  part  of  the  time 
acting  as  president  and  also  as  secretary.  Politically  he  is  a  Democrat.  Mr. 
Hanney  is  unmarried  and  makes  his  home  with  his  brother  John. 

John  F.  Hanney  was  bom  March  3,  1867,  in  Norwegian  township,  Schuyl- 
kill county,  near  Pottsville,  and  obtained  his  education  in  the  local  public 
schools.  When  a  boy  he  began  picking  slate  at  the  Wadesville  colliery  in  New 
Castle  township,  continuing  at  this  work  for  about  four  years.  Subsequently 
he  drove  mules  at  the  colliery  for  a  time,  till  he  began  to  leam  the  trade  of 
horseshoer  with  Thomas  Brennan,  of  Pottsville.  After  four  years  in  JMr. 
Brennan's  employ  he  spent  a  short  time  in  Philadelphia,  was  later  employed 
for  about  one  year  in  a  lumber  camp  in  Potter  county.  Pa.,  at  his  trade,  and 
then  returned  to  Pottsville,  where  he  and  his  brother  started  their  present 
business  in  1892.  Thoroughly  conversant  with  all  the  needs  of  their  business, 
they  have  given  solicitous  attention  to  all  their  patrons,  who  have  showed 
due  appreciation  of  the  high-class  service  which  may  be  obtained  at  their  estab- 
lishment. Mr.  Hanney  has  taken  considerable  interest  in  keeping  abreast  of 
the  times  in  his  line,  and  he  is  a  prominent  member  of  the  Master  Horseshoers' 
Association  of  Pottsville,  of  which  he  is  at  present  financial  secretary.  Move- 
ments for  development  in  any  line  have  also  had  his  hearty  support,  but  he  has 
never  cared  for  public  office,  preferring  to  do  his  share  by  choosing  reliable 
officials  and  supporting  good  causes  with  his  influence.  Politically  he  is  a 
Democrat.    He  and  his  family  belong  to  St.  Patrick's  Roman  Catholic  Church. 

In  1904  Mr.  Hanney  married  Florence  V.  Carr,  daughter  of  John  Carr,  of 
Schuylkill  Haven,  and  they  are  the  parents  of  five  children,  namely :  Esther 
and  Edward,  who  are  attending  school ;  John ;  Thomas ;  and  Martin,  who  died 
March  10,  1914,  when  he  was  one  year,  six  months  old. 

JAMES  CURRAN,  of  Gordon,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  now  living  retired 
after  fifty  years'  service  in  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Readmg  Rail- 
way Company,  was  bom  in  Ireland  in  October,  1830.  His  parents,  Edward 
and  Catherine  (Cowan)  Curran,  were  natives  of  King's  County,  Ireland,  where 
they  died.  John  Curran,  the  paternal  grandfather  of  James,  lived  to  the  age 
of  105,  while  his  wife  reached  the  still  greater  age  of  108  years. 

James  Curran  came  from  Ireland  to  America  in  1849,  landing  at  New 
York  City  on  April  8th  of  that  year.  He  remained  there  but  a  short  time, 
before  the  end  of  the  year  going  to  Port  Carbon,  Schuylkill  county,  and  from 


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780  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

there  to  Carlisle,  Pa.  In  1854,  when  the  Indians  of  the  West  became  trouble- 
some, Mr.  Curran  enlisted  in  the  United  States  army,  serving  mitil  the  end 
of  the  disturbances.  He  then  came  to  St.  Qair,  Schuylkill  county,  where 
he  went  to  work  for  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company,  during 
the  next  four  years  assisting  in  the  construction  of  the  road,  being  foreman 
of  a  construction  crew.  After  the  completion  of  the  work  he  came  to  Gordon, 
where  he  continued  work  for  the  same  company  until  he  had  rounded  out  a 
service  of  fifty  years,  when  he  was  pensioned. 

In  i860  James  Curran  was  married  to  Anna  Riley,  daughter  of  Bartlett 
and  Anna  (Murphy)  Riley,  natives  of  Ireland,  who  emigrated  to  America  in 
an  early  day.  The  father  returned  to  Ireland,  where  he  died,  but  the  mother 
passed  away  in  this  country.  Mrs.  James  Curran  died  in  November,  1904. 
She  was  the  mother  of  children  as  follows:  Katherine,  deceased;  Mary, 
widow  of  Michael  Conway,  who  has  two  children,  James  and  Margaret  (Mrs. 
Conway  is  housekeeper  for  her  father)  ;  James,  postmaster  at  Gordon ;  Edward, 
Julia  and  James,  all  deceased.  Mr.  Curran  is  now  the  only  member  of  his 
parents'  family  alive,  and  coming  of  a  remarkably  long-lived  race,  he  bids  fair 
to  hold  their  record  for  age  and  vitality.  He  and  his  family  have  always  been 
devout  members  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Church. 

EDWARD  SHOENER,  at  present  an  official  of  Orwigsburg,  is  a  native 
of  West  Brunswick  township,  this  county,  and  a  member  of  one  of  the  old 
families  of  that  section.  The  family  is  of  German  extraction,  and  his  first 
ancestors  in  America  settled  in  Berks  county.  Pa.,  the  branch  here  under  con- 
sideration moving  to  southern  Schuylkill  county,  where  its  members  have 
been  prominent  for  many  years. 

John  Shoener,  grandfather  of  Edward  Shoener,  followed  farmine  in  West 
Brunswick  township,  and  was  a  highly  respected  man  in  his  neighborhood. 
He  died  upon  his  farm,  and  is  buried  in  the  Reformed  cemetery  at  Orwigs- 
burg. His  children  were:  Henry,  John,  Daniel,  William,  Jacob,  Anna  and 
Susanna. 

Henry  Shoener,  son  of  John,  was  bom  July  23,  1813,  in  West  Brunswick 
township,  and  died  Jan.  20,  1890.  He  is  buried  with  his  wife  in  the  Reformed 
cemetery  at  Orwigsburg.  He  followed  farming  in  his  native  township,  clear- 
ing part  of  his  land,  and  was  a  well  known  man  of  his  day.  His  wife,  Christiana 
(Schipe),  daughter  of  Henry  Schipe,  was  bom  Dec.  31,  1818,  and  died  Oct. 
6,  1891.  Her  father  died  Nov.  25,  1879.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Shoener  had  a  large 
family,  viz. :  Lewis,  Caroline,  Joseph,  Edward,  William,  John,  Charles,  Albert, 
Daniel,  Thomas,  Clara  and  Mary. 

Edward  Shoener  was  bom  April  i,  1844,  in  West  Bmnswick  township, 
and  obtained  his  education  there  in  the  public  schools.  He  was  a  youth  of 
nineteen  when  he  enlisted  for  service  in  the  Civil  war,  joining  Company  I, 
48th  Regiment,  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Infantry,  with  which  he  served  eighteen 
months,  being  in  the  army  until  the  close  of  ttie  war.  Among  the  battles  in 
which  he  took  part  were  ttiose  of  the  Wildem^ss,  Spottsylvania  Court  House, 
North  Anna  River,  Cold  Harbor,  Shady  Grove,  Poplar  Road  Church,  and  the 
actions  around  Petersburg,  including  the  mine  explosion.  After  the  war  he 
retumed  home  and  for  a  short  tin^e  was  engaged  in  agricultural  work,  subse- 
quently spending  two  years  as  an  employe  in  the  coal  mines.  Then  he  engaged 
in  the  contracting  and  building  business  at  Orwigsburg,  where  he  put  up  many 
residences  and  also  the  first  factory  of  the  H.  S.  Albright  Shoe  Company. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  781 

There  are  many  bams  of  his  construction  in  soUthem  Schuylkill  county.  He 
retired  from  the  contracting  business  in  1907,  but  he  has  not  withdrawn 
entirely  from  active  life,  still  holding  the  office  of  tax  collector  for  the  borough, 
which  office  he  has  filled  for  the  last  twenty-five  years.  He  has  had  other  con- 
nections with  the  administration  of  the  municipal  government,  having  served 
one  year  as  chief  burgess,  one  year  as  assessor  and  eight  years  as  special  police- 
man, to  which  position  he  was  appointed.  Politically  he  is  a  Republican,  and 
prominent  in  the  local  activities  of  the  party.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Reformed 
Church,  of  the  Independent  Americans,  and  of  Jere  Helms  Post,  No.  26,  G. 
A.  R.,  of  Schuylkill  Haven.  There  are  few  citizens  in  Orwigsbiirg  or  that 
vicinity  more  generally  known. 

Mr.  Shoener  married  Carrie  E.  Porter,  daughter  of  Plini  Porter,  and  they 
have  had  two  children :  Plini,  deceased ;  and  Elizabeth,  wife  of  Morton  Zulick, 
an  electrician,  of  New  York  City. 

FRANKLIN  WAGNER,  a  resident  of  Pine  Grove  since  1891,  is  now 
enjoying  his  leisure  years  after  an  industrious  early  career.  He  has  spent  all 
his  life  in  Schuylkill  county,  having  been  bom  June  6,  1843,  i"  Washington 
township,  where  he  lived  until  his  removal  to  Pine  Grove,  with  the  exception 
of  the  period  of  his  absence  while  in  the  army  during  the  Civil  wah  He  is 
a  son  of  Philip  Wagner  and  grandson  of  a  pioneer  of  the  county,  a  substantial 
agriculturist  of  his  day. 

Philip  Wagner  was  bom  in  Washington  township,  where  he  followed 
farming,  as  well  as  his  trade  of  plasterer,  all  his  life.  His  wjfe,  Susan  (Har- 
ring),  was  also  a  native  of  Washington  township,  where  her  father  was  an 
early  settler  and  farmer.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wagner  had  a  family  of  eleven  chil- 
dren: Lydia,  now  deceased;  Louis,  deceased;  Mary,  deceased;  Franklin; 
John,  deceased ;  Eliza,  wife  of  George  Moyer,  of  Washington  township ;  Jona- 
than, who  lives  on  the  old  homestead  in  that  township;  Susan,  wife  of  Fred- 
erick Theil,  of  Lebanon,  Pa.;  Henry,  living  in  Washington  township;  Tillie, 
wife  of  Jacob  Knausz,  of  Lebanon;  and  Emma,  wife  of  Reuben  Keefer,  of 
Pine  Grove  township. 

Franklin  Wagner  was  reared  on  the  home  farm  in  Washington  township 
and  attended  the  local  schools  in  his  boyhood.  When  he  took  up  the  business 
of  earning  a  livelihood  on  his  ov^n  account  he  did  farm  work  for  one  year,  and 
then  leamed  his  father's  trade,  plastering,  at  which  he  was  profitably  engaged 
until  his  retirement,  meantime,  in  1891,  settling  at  Pine  Grove,  where  he  has 
had  his  home  since.  High  class  work  and  dependable  service  were  at  the 
foundation  of  his  success  and  drew  a  patronage  which  kept  him  busy  as  long 
as  he  continued  at  his  calling.  He  has  had  a  thoroughly  domestic  life,  his  only 
association  outside  of  his  business  being  his  membership  in  Wolf  Post,  No.  203, 
G.  A.  R.  (which  he  is  serving  as  officer  of  the  day),  and  in  Salem  Lutheran 
Church  in  Washington  township.  He  is  entitled  to  connection  with  the  Grand 
Army  by  reason  of  his  two  terms  of  service  during  the  Civil  war.  During  the 
emergency  of  1863  he  enlisted  in  Company  F,  26th  Pennsylvania  Regiment, 
and  on  Feb.  i,  1864.  he  joined  Company  F,  ii6th  Pennsylvania  Volunteer 
Infantry,  with  which  he  served  until  the  close  of  the  war.  He  was  mustered 
out  at  Washington  July  14,  1865,  with  the  rank  of  corporal,  to  which  he  had 
been  promoted  June  i,  1865,  and  was  honorably  discharged  at  Washington 
July  24,  1865.  His  command  was  attached  to  the  2d  Corps,  Army  of  the 
Potomac,  and  he  saw  service  in  a  number  of  important  engagements,  including 


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782  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

the  Wilderness,  Spottsylvania,  Po  River,  Tody's  Tavern,  North  Anna  River, 
Pamunkey  River,  Tolopotomy,  Cold  Harbor,  Williams  Farm,  Deep  Bottom, 
Strawberry  Plains,  Hatcher's  Run,  Dabney's  Mill,  Sunderland  Station,  Amelia 
Court  House,  Sailor's  Creek,  Farmville  and,  Appomattox. 

Returning  home  at  the  end  of  his  military  service,  Mr.  Wagner  was  mar- 
ried shortly  afterwards,  in  1866,  to  Elizabeth  Kemmerling,  who  was  bom  in 
Washington  township,  daughter  of  Jonathan  and  Salome  (Fenstermacher) 
Kemmerling.  She  died  May  14,  1882,  the  mother  of  four  children:  Louisa 
A.;  Mary,  wife  of  Charles  Schwambach,  of  Reading;  Alice,  wife  of  George 
Schneck,  of  Washington  township;  and  Eva  Savannah,  deceased. 

ROBERT  W.  C.  HOOPER,  late  of  Pottsville,  was  one  of  the  most 
respected  citizens  of  that  borough  throughout  his  residence  there.  A  native 
of  Cornwall,  England,  he  was  a  son  of  Robert  Hooper,  who  lived  and  died  in 
Cornwall. 

Mr.  Hooper  learned  the  trade  of  blacksmith,  and  after  settling  at  Pottsville, 
Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  was  engaged  as  such  in  the  Reading  shops,  where  his  skill 
as  a  mechanic  and  admirable  personal  character  made  him  valued  as  a  reliable 
employe.  For  twenty  years  he  served  as  a  local  preacher  of  the  Methodist 
Church  in  Pottsville,  and  was  specially  well  known  in  that  capacity,  having 
been  an  earnest  Bible  student  and  a  forceful  speaker.  Local  public  affairs  also 
came  in  for  a  share  of  his  attention,  and  at  the  time  of  his  death  he  was  serving 
as  a  member  of  the  borough  council,  in  which  position  he  acquitted  himself 
honorably  and  to  the  thorough  satisfaction  of  his  fellow  citizens.  Politically 
he  was  a  Republican.  He  died  at  his  home  in  Pottsville,  No.  1 107  West  Market 
street,  Feb.  9,  1898,  aged  fifty-eight  years. 

Mr.  Hooper  was  married  in  England  to  Mary  J.  Spry,  daughter  of  Richard 
and  Ann  (Job)  Spry.  Like  her  husband  she  was  bom  in  Cornwall,  England, 
and  three  of  her  children  were  bom  in  that  country,  the  family  coming  to 
America  in  September,  1868.  They  landed  at  Castle  Garden,  N.  Y.,  and  lived 
at  various  locations  for  a  number  of  years  before  coming  to  Pottsville.  Mrs. 
Hooper  continues  to  reside  in  her  home  there  with  her  daughter,  Mrs.  Miller. 
Five  children  were  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hooper,  namely:  (i)  William 
John  Spry,  bom  Nov.  6,  1859,  is  now  employed  as  a  foreman  in  the  Baldwin 
Locomotive  Works  at  Philadelphia.  He  married  Mary  Casper,  and  they 
reside  in  Philadelphia.  They  have  two  children.  May  and  Susanna,  who  are 
married  respectively  to  Harry  Snyder  and  John  Snyder,  brothers.  (2)  Ann 
Job,  bom  Oct.  16,  i860,  is  the  wife  of  Edwin  Miller,  of  Pottsville,  Pa.,  wire 
clerk  for  the  Westem  Union  Telegraph  Company  at  this  point.  They  live 
with  her  mother,  Mrs.  Hooper.  (3)  Josephine,  bom  Jan.  8,  1863,  is  the  widow 
of  James  Buddell,  and  resides  at  Pottsville.  She  has  a  family  of  six  children : 
Robert  Hooper,  Annie  Laveme  (Mrs.  Roy  Hartranft),  Beatrice  Josepha 
(Mrs.  Julian  Schwartzwald),  Clair,  Winifred  and  Evelyn.  (4)  Robert,  bom 
Jan.  22,  1874,  is  a  linotype  operator  at  Jersey  City.  He  married  Martha 
Gutzell.  (5)  Mary  Winifred,  bom  Nov.  20,  1876,  died  Oct.  10,  1901.^  She 
was  the  wife  of  Charles  Alter. 


Ananias  and  Ann  Job  had  the  following  children,  all  bom  in  England: 
Ananias,  Feb.  28,  1784;  Mary,  Sept.v26,  1785;  Ann,  May  8,  1788;  John,  June 
II,  1790;  Thomas,  March  13,  1793  (died  in  infancy);  Thomas  (2),  May  3, 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  783 

1795;  Zephaniah,  Sept.  14,  1800;  Ann  (2),  April  16,  1802;  James,  Dec.  7, 
1804. 

JEREMIAH  SEITZINGER,  the  oldest  living  resident  of  Port  Carbon, 
now  retired  from  active  pursuits,  is  a  worthy  representative  of  an  old  family 
founded  here  by  Col.  Nicholas  Seitzinger,  his  grandfather. 

The  Seitzingers  are  one  of  the  families  descended  from  Hessian  soldiers 
who  remained  in  America  following  their  services  in  the  American  Revolu-  • 
tionary  war,  and  no  family  in  this  section  of  Schuylkill  county  is  more  deserv- 
edly honored.  Col.  Nicholas  Seitzinger  was  a  German  by  birth.  He  was  sent 
to  this  country  as  one  of  the  Hessian  soldiers  hired  by  England,  and  thus 
came  to  take  part  in  the  Revolution,  but  his  sympathies  were  with  the  Colonies, 
and  after  the  war,  in  which  he  served  as  a  colonel,  he  did  not  return  to  the 
old  cotmtry.  For  a  time  he  lived  in  Bucks  county.  Pa.,  removing  thence  to 
what  is  now  Schuylkill  cotmty,  where  he  took  up  1,600  acres  of  land.  The 
region  was  then  a  wilderness,  but  he  set  bravely  about  the  task  of  making  a 
home  for  himself  and  family,  and  it  was  he  who  established  the  town  of 
Fotmtain  Springs  (near  Ashland),  which  was  really  named  in  his  honor.  He 
is  buried  in  the  cemetery  there.  His  family  consisted  of  children  as  follows : 
Catherine,  who  married  Samuel  Scott  and  (second)  Henry  Fisher;  George; 
Peter ;  Samuel ;  Harry ;  Nicholas ;  Edward ;  John ;  and  Jacob  W.  Jacob  built 
the  "Exchange  HoteV'  at  Pottsville. 

Samuel  Seitzinger,  father  of  Jeremiah,  was  bom  at  Reading,  Pa.,  in  i8o(f^  3L 
and  came  to  Port  Carbon  in  young  manhood.  He  was  a  blacksmith  by  trade, 
and  did  canal  work  in  that  line,  and  later  built  the  "Port  Carbcm  House."  On 
April  I,  1834,  he  removed  to  Fountain  Springs,  where  he  followed  his  trade  for 
two  years.  On  April  i,  1836,  he  returned  to  Port  Carbon,  where  he  continued 
to  work  at  blacksmi thing  until  his  death,  which  occurred  March  25,  1871.  He 
is  buried  in  the  Presbyterian  cemetery  in  that  borough.  His  wife,  Hannah 
(Reed),  was  bom  in  1807  at  Minersyille,  Pa.,  daughter  of  Thomas  Reed,  and 
died  July  25,  1886.  She  is  buried  at  Port  Carbon.  Children  as  follows  were 
bom  to  this  marriage :  Augustus,  who  is  deceased ;  Charity,  deceased ;  Jona- 
than; Lucinda,  deceased;  Eliza,  decea^sed;  Samuel,  who  was  killed  at  the 
battle  of  the  Wilderness  May  6,  1864,  while  serving  with  the  96th  Pennsylvania 
Regiment;  Matilda,  deceased;  Ellen,  Mrs.  James  Teasdale,  now  living  at 
Reading,  Pa.;  Thomas,  who  served  during  the  Civil  war  in  the  7th  Pennsyl- 
vania Cavalry;  and  Jeremiah. 

Jeremiah  Seitzinger,  son  of  Samuel,  was  bom  Nov.  22,  1828,  at  Pottsville, 
Pa.  When  a  boy  he  worked  with  his  father,  and  he  was  but  eleven  years  old 
when  he  commenced  boating  on  the  canal,  in  which  work  he  was  engaged 
for  four  summers^  meantime  attending  school  in  the  winter  season.  He  then 
leamed  the  trade  of  blacksmith  with  Tobias  Wintersteen,  with  whom  he 
remained  until  1850.  He  continued  to  follow  that  calling  until  he  retired,  for 
over  thirty  years  m  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Company,  for 
whom  he  worked  from  1855  "^^^il  December,  1887.  F^^  ^  f^w  years  afterwards 
he  was  employed  in  the  Franklin  Iron  Works  at  Port  Carbon,  retiring  when 
he  gave  up  his  position  there.  Mr.  Seitzinger  has  always  led  a  quiet  life,  and 
to  this  fact  he  attributes  his  old  age  and  good  health.  However,  he  never  failed 
to  do  his  duty  in  any  of  the  positions  he  held,  having  an  excellent  reputation 
for  industry  and  faithfulness  to  every  obligation.     He  is  an  Odd  Fellow  of 


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784  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

long  standing,  having  joined  Schuylkill  Lodge,  No.  27,  of  Port  Carbon,  Dec. 
6,  1849 ;  he  is  a  past  grand  of  that  body.  , 

Mr.  Seitzinger  married  Mary  Martin,  who  was  bom  Aug.  15,  1824,  daugh- 
ter of  Peter  Martin,  a  native  of  Ireland.  She  died  Jan.  5,  1896,  and  is  buried 
at  Port  Carbon.  Children  as  follows  were  bom  to  this  marriage:  George, 
who  lives  in  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  married  Rose  Martin ;  Margaret,  deceased,  was 
the  wife  of  James  Rowe;  Elizabeth,  deceased,  was  the  wife  of  James  Burke; 
'  Samuel,  of  Philadelphia,  married  Catherine  Gilmartin;  Peter  is  deceased; 
Thomas  resides  at  Port  Carbon  and  is  married  to  Mary  Flannery ;  John  died 
when  two  years  old ;  Jeremiah  is  a  resident  of  Philadelphia ;  Mary  F.  is  the 
wife  of  Robert  Harron. 

ROBERT  HARRON  was  bom  in  Blythe  township,  Schuylkill  county, 
June  22,  1865.  His  parents,  John  and  Elizabeth  (Steen)  Harron,  were  natives 
of  Ireland  and  Scotland,  respectively,  came  to  the  United  States  when  young, 
and  settled  in  Blythe  township,  Schuylkill  Co',  Pa.  John  Harron  was  a  mine 
superintendent  for  many  years,  and  one  of  the  early  coal  operators  in  Schuyl- 
kill county.  He  died  at  Palo  Alto,  this  county,  and  is  buried  at  Port  Carbon. 
His  children  were:  Alexander,  William,  James,  Isabella  (wife  of  Bernard 
Murray),  Samuel,  Robert,  and  Mary  (who  died  in  infancy). 

Robert  Harron  has  spent  his  entire  working  life  in  the  employ  of  the 
Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company,  and  is  at  present  employed  as 
flagman  from  Pottsville  to  Silver  Creek.  He  makes  his  home  at  Port  Carbon, 
where  he  is  well  known  and  a  member  in  good  standing  of  the  I.  O.  O.  F., 
P.  O.  S.  of  A.  and  P.  O.  of  A.  lodges.  On  Aug.  28,  i^,  he  married  Mary 
F.  Seitzinger,  daughter  of  Jeremiah  Seitzinger,  and  they  have  three  children : 
Robert  L.,  Ruth  E.  and  Anna  C.  The  family  are  Presbyterians  in  religious 
connection. 

JOSEPH  F.  MOLONY  (deceased)  was  known  personally  to  many  of  the  ^ 
residents  of  Palo  Alto,  his  long  service  in  the  ticket  office  of  the  Philadelphia 
&  Reading  Railway  Company,  his  experience  in  the  hotel  business  and  as  tax 
collector  at  Palo  Alto,  having  brought  him  into  touch  with  many  of  his  fellow 
citizens. 

Mr.  Molony  was  bom  at  Palo  Alto  Feb.  22,  i860,  son  of  William  Molony,  ' 
a  native  of  Ireland,  who  came  to  this  country  in  1847.  He  soon  located  at 
Pottsville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  for  a  number  of  years  was  an  employe  of 
the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company,  with  whom  he  continued  until 
his  death,  at  the  age  of  sixty  years.  In  his  native  country  he  had  married 
Catherine  McDermott,  who  was  also  bom  in  Ireland,  and  the  young  couple 
emigrated  to  America  shortly  afterwards.  Ten  children  were  bom  to  them, 
several  of  whom  died  young.  Of  those  who  reached  maturity  Christopher  was 
well  known  as  a  train  dispatcher  for  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway 
Company;  Edward  W.,  deceased,  is  mentioned  farther  on  in  this  article;  Frank 
died  when  twenty  years  old ;  Catherine  is  the  wife  of  Frank  Phillips,  and  they 
occupy  the  old  homestead  at  Palo  Alto. 

Joseph  F.  Molony  obtained  his  education  in  the  local  public  schools.  At 
an  early  age  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway 
Company,  with  whom  he  remained  for  a  period  of  twenty  years,  during  much 
of  this  time  as  ticket  man  at  the  local  office.  He  sold  the  last  ticket  issued 
by  the  company  at  the  old  station.     In    1897   Mr.   Molony  engaged  in  the 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  785 

hotel  business  at  Palo  Alto,  which  he  carried  on  continuously  thereafter  until 
his  sudden  death,  on  May  i,  191 5.  His  friendly  disposition  was  as  much 
of  a  factor  in  his  success  here  as^  his  methodical  business  ways.  In  1899 
Mr.  Molony  was  elected  to  the  position  of  tax  collector  at  Palo  Alto,  in  which 
he  continued  to  serve  to  the  end  of  his  life,  though  he  was  independent  politi- 
cally, giving  his  support  to  the  men  and  measures  he  favored  most,  regardless 
of  party  ties.  He  was  a  member  of  St.  Patrick's  Catholic  Church  at  Pottsville. 
Mr.  Molony  married  Catherine  C.  Lee,  a  daughter  of  the  late  Ralph  Lee,  of 
Pottsville,  who  was  well  known  as  superintendent  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Read- 
ing shops  there.     Mr.  and  Mrs.  Molony  had  no  children. 

Edward  W.  Molony,  brother  of  Joseph  F.  Molony,  was  for  many  years 
a  representative  of  the  newspapers  of  Schuylkill  county.  Pa.  He  died  March 
20,  1902.  His  arduous  and  exacting  labors  as  a  telegraph  operator  and  news- 
paper reporter  for  years  had  undermined  his  health,  and  when  he  was  stricken 
with  a  severe  attack  of  pneumonia  his  greatly  weakened  system  gave  way 
under  the  strain.  Mr.  Molony  was  bom  in  Palo  Alto,  Pa.,  Aug.  15,  185 1, 
and  after  a  few  years  of  school  took  up  the  study  of  telegraphy.  He  was 
employed  as  operator  in  Philadelphia  for  a  time  and  later  entered  the  service 
of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Company,  for  whom  he  worked  until 
1890.  During  the  "Molly  Maguire"  troubles  and  subsequent  pursuit  he  was 
intrusted  with  many  secret  messages,  the  knowledge  alone  of  which  was  a 
dangerous  thing  to  have.  He  had  many  an  exciting  experience,  and  in  all 
of  the  incidents  in  which  he  had  a  part  displayed  the  tact  and  courage  for 
which  he  came  to  be  noted.  The  last  years  of  his  telegraph  service  were  under 
Superintendent  Ohlhausen  in  Jersey  City. 

When  he  came  to  Schuylkill  county  Mr.  Molony  took  up  the  work  of 
receiving  the  Associated  Press  reports  for  the  Miners'  Journal,  holding  the 
place  for  two  years.  After  that  time  he  became  a  local  correspondent,  writing 
up  the  suburban  news  for  the  newspapers  of  Pottsville.  Next  he  was  offered 
the  position  of  "general  utility"  man  on  the  Chronicle,  and  later  he  filled  the 
same  position  on  the  Republican.  After  a  lime  he  was  made  court  reporter, 
gathering  the  news  from  the  courthouse  with  a  fidelity  to  detail  and  broadness 
of  comprehension  that  was  gratifying  alike  to  his  employers  and  to  the  officials. 
This  position  he  held  at  the  time  of  his  death. 

Mr.  Molony  was  a  favorite  with  all  who  came  in  contact  with  him,  and  his 
genial  smile  was  never  dimmed  by  personal  feelings  or  the  illness  from  which 
he  suffered  at  the  last.  His  wit  was  proverbial  and  never  carried  with  it  the 
sting  of  malice.  Even  among  his  rivals  in  newspaper  work  he  was  remarkably 
popular,  and  few  there  were  who  did  not  miss  his  ready  reply  and  kindly 
influence.  He  was  always  ready  to  unite  in  progressive  movements  for  the 
benefit  of  his  fellow  men,  and  he  was  a  prominent  member  of  the  old  Schuylkill 
County  Pen  and  Pencil  Club.  With  the  successive  members  of  the  borough 
council  he  was  always  popular,  having  reported  the  proceedings  of  that  body 
for  many  years. 

Mr.  Molony  was  a  brother-in-law  of  the  late  William  A.  Duffy,  the  lamented 
rector  of  St.  Patrick's  Catholic  parish,  and  his  wife,  Catherine  C.  (Duffy) 
Molony,  was  left  to  mourn  his  early  death  with  several  children,  William, 
Walter,  Edward,  Leroy  and  Vivian. 

HENRY  LANDEMANN,  formerly  a  mine  foreman,  now  living  retired  at 
Minersville.  is  a  citizen  of  German  extraction  whose  industrious\  and  uprieht 
Vol.  n— 12 


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786  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

life  is  a  credit  to  his  nationality  and  also  to  the  community  of  his  adoption. 
Mr.  Landemann  was  bom  in  Bavaria  Nov.  15,  1841,  son  of  Philip  and  Louisa 
(Meyers)  Landemann.  The  mother  died  in  Germany  and  the  father  came  to 
America  alone,  settling  at  Minersville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  died.  He 
followed  railroad  work  and  was  employed  at  the  mines  a  short  time,  living 
retired  for  three  years  before  his  death. 

Henry  Landemann  was  twelve  years  old  when  he  came  to  America,  and  he 
has  since  had  his  home  at  Minersville.  He  began  work  as  a  slate  picker  at  the 
breaker  for  Kear  &  Company,  in  whose  employ  he  continued  from  1858  to 
1870,  for  a  number  of  years  acting  as  boss  for  this  concern.  For  forty  years 
afterwards  he  was  with  the  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Company,  first  as  foreman 
at  the  Mine  Hill  Gap  colliery  and  later  at  the  Beechwood  and  Richardson 
collieries,  at  the  Oakdale  washery,  at  Phoenix  PaVk,  and  at  the  Thompson 
colliery,  where  he  continued  until  his  retirement  in  November,  191 1.  He  has 
since  been  living  retired  at  Minersville.  Mr.  Landemann's  long  and  faithful 
service  with  the  Reading  Company  gained  him  a  wide  acquaintance  in  his  field 
of  work  and  he  made  many  friends  among  his  associates,  his  high  character 
and  conscientious  attention  to  duty  winning  him  the  esteem  of  all  with  whom  he 
came  in  contact.  During  the  Civil  war  Mr.  Landemann  served  nine  months 
as  a  member  of  Company  A,  129th  Regiment,  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Infantry, 
and  he  is  a  prominent  member  of  George  J.  Lawrence  Post,  No.  17,  G.  A.  R., 
which  he  is  at  present  serving  as  commander.  In  religion  he  is  a  member  of 
the  Reformed  Church. 

Mr.  Landemann  married  Caroline  Gable,  of  Columbia  county.  Pa.,  and 
they  have  had  a  large  family,  viz. :  Hannah,  now  the  wife  of  George  Diereff ; 
Charles,  deceased;  Matilda,  wife  of  W.  Jenkins;  William  A.,  living  at  home; 
Bertie,  who  married  Harry  Prescot;  George;  Caroline,  wife  of  William  Wil- 
liams ;  and  three  children  who  died  young. 

STEPHEN  REESE  has  been  a  lifelong  resident  of  Schuylkill  county, 
having  been  bom  at  Pottsville  Oct.  13,  1839,  ^"^  resided  there  until  his 
removal  to  Ashland.  He  is  of  Welsh  extraction,  his  parents,  Stephen  and 
Johanna  (Lloyd)  Reese,  having  been  natives  of  Wales,  where  they  were 
reared  and  remained  until  after  their  marriage.  On  coming  to  this  country, 
in  the  early  fifties,  they  settled  at  Pottsville,  Schuylkill  county,  where  Mr. 
Reese  soon  established  himself  as  an  enterprising  business  man.  He  carried 
on  a  flour  and  feed  store,  and  for  several  years  operated  a  breaker  at  the 
mines,  and  also  owned  and  carried  on  a  general  store  at  Pottsville.  He  con- 
tinued to  reside  at  that  place  until  just  before  his  death,  passing  away  in  1859 
at  New  Berlin,  where  he  had  gone  to  live.  His  wife  had  died  in  1845.  They 
were  the  parents  of  sixteen  children,  of  whom  but  three  survive:  Stephen, 
John  and  Isaiah,  the  two  last  named  living  at  Harrisburg. 

Stephen  Reese  received  a  good  common  school  education,  and  when  a 
boy  began  to  learn  the  trade  of  shoemaker,  which  he  followed  throughout  his 
active  years,  in  early  manhood  coming  to  Ashland,  where  he  has  ever  since 
made  his  home.  For  some  time  past  he  has  been  living  in  retirement,  enjoying 
the  ease  which  he  deserves  after  an  industrious  life.  He  built  the  home  on 
Centre  street  he  now  occupies. 

As  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  war,  Mr.  Reese  naturally  took  great  interest 
in  the  organization  of  the  Grand  Army  of  the  Republic,  he  himself  assist- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  787 

ing  in  the  organization  of  Joseph  Hooker  post,  of  which  he  was  a  charter 
member,  and  one  of  the  earliest  commanders.  He  served  in  the  Civil  war 
under  three  enlistments.  When  the  war  broke  out  he  was  living  at  Ashland, 
and  he  was  the  first  man  to  enlist  from  that  place,  becoming  a  member  of 
Company  I,  5th  Pa.  Vol.  Inf.,  on  April  12,  1861.  At  that  time  he  entered 
the  service  for  a  period  of  three  months,  subsequently  enlisting  for  nine 
months  in  Company  G,  129th  Pennsylvania  Volunteer  Infantry,  under  Cap- 
tain Leib,  and  the  third  time  joined  the  emergency  service  for  the  defense 
of  the  State.  He  took  part  in  many  engagements,  and  at  the  battle  of  Chancel- 
lors ville  was  wounded  in  the  ear.  He  was  mustered  out  at  Harrisburg.  Mr. 
Reese  has  always  been  a  Republican  in  his  political  views,  and  has  been  quite 
an  active  worker  for  the  success  of  his  party  in  the  borough.  His  religious 
connection  is  with  the  Methodist  Church. 

On  June  15,  1863,  Mr.  Reese  married  Regina  Ebert,  a  native  of  Schuyl- 
kill county,  daughter  of  Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Ebert,  who  were  early  set- 
tlers at  Ashland.    They  died  there,  and  are  buried  at  Fountain  Springs. 

Mrs.  Reese  passed  away  April  30,  1910,  the  mother  of  eight  children: 
David,  who  is  a  resident  of  Ashland;  Ella,  deceased;  William,  deceased; 
Martha,  deceased;  Harry,  deceased;  Maude,  wife  of  Joseph  Merther,  of 
Chester,  Pa.;  Edward,  who  lives  at  Ashland;  and  Lillie,  wife  of  Edward 
Blank,  of  Ashland. 

REV.  HOWARD  H.  KRAUSS,  A.  B.,  A.  M.,  was  bom  near  East  Green- 
ville, Pa.,  March  7,  1876.  When  he  was  quite  young  his  parents,  Henry 
Schultz  and  Amanda  (Hoffman)  Krauss,  moved  to  Kraussdale,  Lehigh  Co., 
Pa.,  and  he  received  his  early  education  in  the  public  school  of  the  village. 
His  teachers  during  his  public  school  days  were  Beneville  X.  Schell,  Michael 
N.  Weidner,  Rev.  C.  D.  Zweier.  Rev.  E.  E.  Schantz,  Prof.  C.  E.  Dietz  (A.  B. 
Princeton),  Prof.  Preston  B.  Rothenberger  (A.  B.  of  Muhlenberg  College). 
In  the  years  1894-95  he  attended  Perkiomen  Seminary,  at  Pennsburg,  Pa., 
and  prepared  for  the  profession  of  teaching.  From  1896  to  1899  he  taught 
the  public  school  at  Coming,  in  Lower  Milford  township,  Lehigh  county, 
the  same  school  at  one  time  taught  by  Rev.  C.  S.  Kriebek,  D.  D.,  now  prin- 
cipal of  Perkiomen  Seminary  at  Pennsburg,  Pa.  From  1899  to  1902  he 
taught  the  public  school  at  Kraussdale,  his  home  school,  formerly  taught  by 
Rev.  Dr.  E.  F.  Krauss,  now  president  of  the  Lutheran  Theological  Seminary 
at  Chicago.  During  his  last  year  of  public  school  teaching  he  also  finished 
his  preparatory  studies  at  Perkiomen  Seminary  and  entered  Muhlenberg  Col- 
lege, at  Allentown,  Pa.  During  his  freshman  year  he  was  president  of  his 
class  and  became  a  member  of  various  literary  organizations.  During  his 
sophomore  year  he  was  elected  librarian  of  the  Euterpean  Literary  Society 
and  had  charge  of  the  library,  and  was  also  appointed  assistant  librarian  of 
Muhlenberg  College.  He  was  tutor  in  Mathematics  during  his  junior  and 
senior  years.  Mr.  Krauss  was  elected  Proctor  of  the  college  during  his 
senior  year,  and  graduated  in  1906  with  the  A.  B.  degree  in  the  first  honor 
group,  delivering  the  German  oration  on  commencement  day.  In  the  fall  of 
the  same  year  he  entered  Mount  Airy  Seminary  of  the  Lutheran  Church,  at 
Philadelphia,  Pa.  In  addition  to  pursuing  his  course  in  theology  he  taught 
at  Perkiomen  Seminary,  Pennsburg,  during  the  spring  and  summer  terms  of 
1907  and  1908,  having  charge  of  the  teachers'  classes,  and  over  one  hun- 
dred of  the  public  school  teachers  of  Pennsylvania  were  instructed  by  him. 


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788  SCHUYLKILL  COUNT,Y,  PENNSYLVANIA 

During  the  summer  term  of  1908  he  taught  Ancient  and  Roman  History  and 
Psychology  and  Pedagogy.  His  graduation  thesis  at  Mount  Airy  Theological 
Seminary  was  **The  Doctrine  of  Predestination."  He  graduated  in  1909,  and 
at  the  commencement  exercises  of  Muhlenberg  College  in  the  same  year  he 
received  the  A.  M.  degree,  having  submitted  in  addition  to  the  regular 
required  studies  a  thesis  on  *The  Strength  and  Weakness  of  Pietism."  On 
June  7,  1909,  he  was  ordained  to  the  office  of  the  holy  ministry  in  Holy  Com- 
munion Church,  Philadelphia,  Pa.,  at  the  1626  annual  convention  of  the 
Ministerium  of  Pennsylvania  of  the  Lutheran  Church  of  the  General  Coun- 
cil. He  accepted  his  first  parish,  on  being  unanimously  elected,  at  St.  John's 
Lutheran  Church,  Berrysburg,  Pa.,  where  he  rendered  excellent  service  in 
reorganizing  the  work  of  the  congregation  and  bringing  the  constitution  into 
harmony  with  Synod,  graded  the  Sunday  school,  organized  the  Luther  League, 
and  largely  raised  the  benevolent  contributions;  all  this  besides  improving 
the  church  property,  adding  many  to  the  church,  and  establishing  a  healthy 
religious  atmosphere.  In  the  summer  of  1912,  having  twice  declined  calls, 
he  accepted  the  urgent  call  to  the  newly  formed  Auburn  parish  in  Schuylkill 
county,  and  entered  upon  his  duties  Oct.  i6th.  This  parish  consists  of  St. 
John,  Auburn,  organized  1845;  Zion,  West  Brunswick,  organized  1755;  St. 
Paul,  South  Manheim,  organized  1784,  and  St.  John,  Friedensburg,  organ- 
ized 1791.  In  the  three  years  he  has  served  in  this  field  he  has  baptized  104, 
buried  sixty,  married  twenty-seven  couples,  confirmed  142,  received  twenty- 
five  by  letter  or  otherwise,  and  raised  for  benevolent  purposes  over  five 
thousand  dollars. 

Mr..  Krauss  has  served  on  various  committees  of  Synod  and  Conference, 
serving  at  the  present  time  as  statistician  of  Conference;  is  visitor  to  the 
Topton  Orphans'  Home  in  Berks  County;  is  a  member  of  the  Church  Effi- 
ciency committee,  Sunday  School  committee.  Executive  committee  of  the 
Luther  League,  and  of  the  committee  "to  investigate  the  apportionment  sys- 
tem and  report  a  plan  for  adoption  to  Synod  ;*'  besides  acting  as  correspond- 
ent and  contributor  to  the  "Lutheran,"  the  official  church  paper  of  the  Synod, 
and  other  periodicals.  In  local  affairs  he  is  a  member  of  the  borough  coun- 
cil, having  at  the  last  election  been  reelected  for  the  full  term  of  four  years. 
He  takes  a  very  prominent  part  in  the  educational  affairs  of  the  community, 
and  is  also  a  member  of  the  Board  of  Trade. 

In  1905  Mr.  Krauss  was  united  in  marriage  to  Miss  Susan  W.  Kriebel, 
daughter  of  Henry  S.  Kriebel  and  his  wife,  nee  Catharine  Wiegner,  Rev.  Wil- 
liam Wackemagel,  D.  D.,  professor  of  German  in  Muhlenberg  College,  per- 
forming the  ceremony.  The  following  children' have  been  bom  to  this  union: 
Frances,  Winifred,  Frederick  and  Alberta  (twins),  and  Ida  May. 

The  ancestors  of  the  Krausses,  Hoffmans,  Schultzes,  Kriebels  and  Wieg- 
ners  came  from  the  Palatinate,  Germany,  and  located  in  the  upper  end  of 
Montgomery  county.  Pa.,  and  in  what  is  now  lower  Lehigh  and  lower  Berks 
counties.  The  Krausses  are  descendants  of  Balthasar  Krauss,  who  with  his 
mother,  Anna  Krauss,  a  widow,  in  September,  1733,  came  with  some  of  the 
first  Schwenkfelders  to  this  country.  He  married  Jan.  16,  1736,  Susanna 
Hoffman  (who  followed  him  from  the  old  country  in  September,  1734),  and 
settled  in  the  most  southern  part  of  the  present  township  of  Lower  Milford, 
Lehigh  Co.,  Pa.  (Kraussdale),  in  the  year  1749.  He  purchased  a  farm  of 
two  hundred  acres,  which  was  surveyed  Sept.  29,  1734,  to  a  George  Schu- 
macher.    Krauss  obtained  a  patent  on  this  land  Dec.  16,  1749,  for  thirty-one 


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AST  OR,   LENOX 


C  - 


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ZION'S  (OLD  RED)  CHURCH 

Original  church  built  1766,  burned  by  the   Indians   1766;   next  church  completed   1770:   rebuilt  of  stone, 
completed  1808;  stone  church  razed  and  replaced  with  present  building^  1888 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  789 

pounds.  He  sold  the  same  to  his  son,  Balthasar  Krauss,  Jr.,  for  seven  hun- 
dred pounds,  and  died  two  years  later,  Feb.  25,  1774,  aged  over  sixty-eight 
years,  leaving  one  son,  Balthasar,  and  four  daughters:  Rosina,  married  to 
George  Heydrick;  Susanna,  married  to  Baltzer  Yeakel;  Barbara,  married  to 
George  Urffer;  and  Maria,  married  to  Mathias  Gerhard. 

Balthasar  Krauss,  Jr.,  had  three  sons  and  four  daughters :  John,  Andrew, 
George,  Helena,  Susanna,  Regina  and  Lydia.  John  Krauss  was  a  well  eclu- 
cated  man,  having  attended  the  well  conducted  schools  of  the  Schwenk- 
felders.  He  became  a  prominent  surveyor,  and  also  a  machinist.  Andrew,  , 
with  his  brother,  John,  became  an  organ  builder,  and  when  he  was  nineteen 
years  old  made  the  first  pipe  organ  in  Pennsylvania,  in  the  year  1790.  They 
made  a  number  of  pipe  organs  for  the  churches  in  the  community.  Later 
George  and  Joel,  sons  of  Andrew,  made  a  bass  viol.  In  1828  George  and 
Samuel  made  a  melodeon,  which  is  believed  to  have  been  the  first  one  ever 
made.  Later  still  George  and  Samuel  made  an  ingenious  globe,  turned  by 
a  clock  which  they  also  made;  the  painting  and  printing  were  put  on  by 
George,  his  copy  being  a  map  of  the  world  which  was  printed  in  London. 
This  globe  turned  by  the  clock  works  once  in  twenty-four  hours.  The  clock 
is  still  in  existence. 


Zion's  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  (Red  Church),  of  West  Bruns- 
wick Township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  About  the  year  1750  a  few  German 
Lutherans  left  their  homes  in  Berks  county.  Pa.,  to  prospect  the  country 
beyond  the  Blue  Mountains,  at  the  same  time  having  in  view  the  planting 
of  a  new  settlement,  if  their  expectations  would  be  realized.  Being  pleased 
with  the  general  appearance  of  the  country,  and  the  apparent  fertility  of  the 
soil — for  it  is  related  that  they  witnessed  in  the  valleys  through  which  flow 
small  streams  of  pure  water  an  indescribably  luxuriant  growth  of  grass — 
they  concluded  to  make  the  newly  explored  region  their  future  home.  How 
they  acquired  the  large  tract  of  land  comprising  nearly  half  of  the  district 
known  at  present  as  Brunswick  township,  Schuylkill  county,  cannot  be 
accurately  ascertained.  Froin  the  language  used  in  the  old  indentures,  it  is 
probable  that  it  was  granted  to  them  by  the  proprietors  of  Pennsylvania,  or 
their  deputies,  for  a  mere  consideration,  namely,  that  it  be  occupied  and 
improved.  The  principal  movers  in  this  new  enterprise  were  Peter  Weyman 
and  Peter  Schmelgert,  who  subsequently  became  very  prominent  in  the  history 
of  Zion's  church.  The  way  having  been  made  clear,  others  soon  followed. 
Some  of  these  settled  on  the  tract  held  by  Weyman;  others  penetrated  still 
further  into  the  interior  and  received  new  tracts  not  as  yet  taken  up.  Thus 
by  the  year  1754  a  considerable  number  of  German  families  had  settled  in 
this  new  territory,  designated  at  that  time  as  the  land  beyond  the  Blue  Moun- 
tain. 

These  Germans,  like  many  others  of  our  forefathers,  were  a  brave,  noble- 
minded  and  enterprising  people,  and  withal  a  people  imbued  with  right  relig- 
ious principles.  Their  object,  therefore,  was  not  simply  to  take  possession  of 
so  much  new  territory,  and  clear  and  cultivate  it  to  advance  their  temporal 
interests,  but  likewise  to  establish  a  community  with  whom  should  be  asso- 
ciated certain  lofty  and  precious  principles.  Hence  they  commenced  at  an 
early  period  of  their  settlement  to  agitate  the  subject  of  organizing^  a  church 
on  the  basis  of  the  principles  they  had  learned  and  lived  in  the  Fatherland. 
In  this  undertaking  they  were  greatly  aided  and  encouraged  by  Rev.  Daniel 


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790  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Schumaker,  at  that  time  laboring  as  a  missionary  in  the  counties  of  Lehigh 
and  Berks,  who  occasionally  visited  them,  sometimes  crossing  the  mountain 
on  foot,  and  preached  to  them,  baptized  their  little  ones,  and  instructed  and 
confirmed  their  sons  and  daughters.  His  self-denying  labors  among  them  com- 
menced as  early  as  the  year  1755  and  continued  to  the  year  1781,  inclusive. 

Ten  years  after  Rev.  Mr.  Schumaker  commenced  to  visit  this  people,  i.  e., 
in  the  year  1765,  they  began  the  erection. of  a  house  of  worship,  and  completed 
it  in  1770,  at  which  time  they  reorganized  the  congregation  under  the  name 
and  title  Zion's  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church,  and  adopted  a  constitution.  But 
for  the  exceedingly  formidable  obstacle  in  the  way,  they  evidently  would  have 
begun  at  an  earlier  period  this  much  desired  object  of  their  heart,  namely, 
the  presence  of  numerous  Indians,  who  seemed  at  that  time  to  have  been  more 
bent  upon  committing  outrages  thkn  in  former  periods  in  the  history  of  the 
Province.  Being  much  exposed  to  their  depredations,  and  not  knowing  how 
soon  they  would  be  obliged  to  flee  for  safety  beyond  the  mountains  and  yield 
the  soil  to  the  savage  sons  of  the  forest,  they  did  not  feel  secure  enough  in  their 
abodes  to  attempt  such  an  enterprise.  That  they  were  actually  driven  from 
their  homes  by  the  Indians  may  be  inferred  from  the  following  allusion  to  their 
trials  in  a  memorial  found  in  the  old  Church  Record :  "Inasmuch  as  we  felt 
it  a  duty  resting  on  us  to  erect  a  church,  after  having  suffered  almost  unen- 
durable calamities  from  the  savage  and  heathenish  people,  the  so-called  Indians, 
1756,  etc.,  but  afterwards  succeeded  by  the  grace  of  God  to  re-establish  peace 
and  quiet  once  more  to  live  in  our  former  abodes,  we,  therefore  resolved  to 
build  a  new  church;  which  was  finally  completed  in  1770." 

From  the  above  it  appears  then  that  the  first  settlers  in  these  parts  were 
very  much  annoyed  and  disturbed  by  the  savages.  Indeed,  many  terrible 
stories  of  Indian  horrors  and  cruelties  are  related  by  their  descendants.  From 
the  fact  that  there  are  no  baptisms  recorded  in  Schumaker's  record  (at  present 
in  the  hands  of  Dr.  Schumaker),  between  1760  and  1765,  this  seems  to  have 
been  the  period  of  greatest  suffering.  They  were  in  consequence  forced  to  flee 
for  safety. 

As  already  stated,  the  first  church  erected  was  commenced  in  1765  and 
completed  in  1770.  It  was  solemnly  dedicated  to  the  service  of  the  Triune 
God  on  the  First  Sunday  in  Advent  by  Rev.  Mr.  Schumaker  in  the  presence 
of  a  large  concourse  of  people,  who  had  come  from  near  and  far  to  attend  the 
services.  The  joy  felt  and  expressed  by  these  people  on  this  happy  occasion 
must  have  been  great.  And  they  had  reasons  to  be  joyful  in  the  Lord.  The 
thought  that  they  were  happily  delivered  from  the  atrocities  of  savage  men. 
and  that  after  having  endured  innumerable  hardships  they  had  now  a  church 
of  their  own,  could  well  fill  their  hearts  with  joy  and  gratitude  to  Almighty 
God.  That  the  erection  of  the  church  was  effected  through  much  self  denial  may 
be  imagined  when  we  remember  that  it  was  five  years  in  building.  The  men 
most  prominent  in  this  work,  as  evidenced  in  the  record,  were  Peter  Schmel- 
gert,  Peter  Weyman,  Jacob  Schaeffer,  Michael  Deibert,  Gottfried  Berger,  Paul 
Heim,  Phillip  Pausman,  Christopher  Schaber,  Casper  Prag,  and  George  Hun- 
singer.  The  numerical  strength  of  the  congregation  at  this  time  cannot  be 
definitely  stated,  as  the  list  of  the  membership  as  well  as  of  the  communicants 
is  wanting  in  the  record.  It  may,  however,  be  estimated  as  not  less  than  one 
hundred,  if  the  number  of  those  who  were  confirmed  in  a  single  year  may  be 
taken  as  correct  data  to  go  by.  These  were  of  course  scattered  over  a  large 
territory,  as  this  was  the  only  church  in  this  section  of  the  country,  so  that 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  791 

this  is  in  fact,  the  oldest  congregation  in  Schuylkill  county.  The  ministers 
who  served  this  congregation,  after  Schumaker,  were:  Frederick  De  Milter, 
1782-83;  Abraham  Gottlieb  Deschler,  1784-88;  Daniel  Lehman,  1789-91,  and 
John  Frederick  Obenhausen,  1 792-1803. 

The  membership  having  considerably  increased  since  the  erection  of  the 
first  church,  so  that  it  was  impossible  to  suitably  accommodate  all  who  desired 
to  worship  there,  the  members  determined,  in  the  year  1799,  to  erect  a  new 
house  of  worship,  larger  and  more  commodious  than  the  old  one.  The  comer- 
stone  of  the  new  building  was  laid  on  the  14th  day  of  October,  in  the  same 
year,  by  the  Rev.  J.  F.  Obenhausen,  who  preached  from  Isaiah  xxviii:i6.  The 
memorial  placed  in  the  cornerstone,  a  copy  of  which  was  preserved,  exhibits 
the  lofty  principles  which  governed  our  Lutheran  forefathers  in  their  actions, 
as  well  as  their  strong  conviction  of  the  correctness  of  the  doctrines  they  be- 
lieved and  maintained,  as  the  following  extracts  will  plainly  show : 

**Since  it  has  pleased  Almighty  God  to  prosper  this  State,  so  that  it  has 
become  a  blooming  and  delightful  garden,  and  this  largely  through  the  instru- 
mentality of  the  Germans,  a  few  of  this  nation,  living  in  this  country  and  in 
this  vicinity,  cherished  the  sincere  desire  not  only  to  confess  until  death  the 
Christian  religion  which  they  had  learned  in  Germany  and  accepted  and  kept 
as  a  perfect  confession  of  the  truth  of  God's  Word  which  is  able  to  make  wise 
unto  salvation,  and  to  publicly  serve  God  in  their  adopted  country,  but  also 
to  see  to  it  that  in  years  to  come  the  same  be  confessed,  loved  and  lived  by 
their  children.  They,  therefore,  erected  in  this  place,  a  house  of  prayer,  in 
which  should  be  taught  the  pure  Word  of  God,  and  the  sacraments  admin- 
istered according  to  the  explicit  command  of  our  dear  Lord,  Jesus  Christ. 
After  many  trials  and  hardships  their  object  was  finally  attained.  The  church 
erected  to  the  God  of  their  fathers  was  solemnly  dedicated,  and  publicly  con- 
fessed and  declared  to  be  and  remain  an  exclusively  Lutheran  church  to  the 
end  of  time.  Inasmuch,  however,  as  this  church,  built  by  the  fathers  under 
many  trying  circiunstances,  has  been  occupied  for  twenty-nine  years,  and  in 
the  meantime  has  greatly  prospered  and  increased  in  numbers,  and  has  there- 
fore become  too  small  for  our  present  purpose,  the  congregation  has,  there- 
fore, resolved  by  the  blessing  of  God  to  build  a  new  and  more  commodious 
house  of  prayer  to  His  honor  and  to  the  glory  of  our  Saviour,  Jesus  Christ^ 
in  order  that  in  future  we  may  have  a  more  convenient  place  to  worship  God 
and  thereby  be  prepared  for  eternal  salvation."  The  following  solemn  invo- 
cation oi  blessings  is  the  conclusion  of  this  paper :  "And  Thou,  my  faithful 
God  and  Father,  have  mercy  upon  the  whole  Christian  Church,  but  especially 
on  this,  thy  congregation !  Preserve  among  them  peace  and  brotherly  love,  and 
bless  and  keep  from  danger  and  accident  those  who  labor  at  this  house !  Be 
and  remain,  O  Lord,  their  God  and  Saviour,  who  are  now  and  will  hereafter 
be  connected  with  the  church !  Bless  the  parents  and  guide  them  by  Thy  Holy 
Spirit,  that  they  may  train  their  children  to  walk  in  the  right  way,  and  teach 
them  the  true  doctrine  of  Jesus  Christ,  in  order  that  after  their  departure 
hence,  they  may  belong  to  the  true  people  of  God,  who  have  faith  in  the  Lord 
Jesus  Christ !  We  commit  this  house  of  prayer  into  thy  gracious  keeping,  so 
that  it  will  truly  be  the  house  of  God  and  the  gate  of  heaven."  This  second 
church,  commenced  in  1799  and  completed  in  1803,  was  dedicated  to  God's 
service  on  the  29th  and  30th  of  May.  1803,  the  dedicatory  services  being  per- 
formed by  Rev.  Daniel  Lehman,  J.  F.  Obenhausen  and  David  Schaeffer. 

Contrary  to  the  wishes  of  its  founders,  this  church  is  at  present  occupied 


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792  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

by  both  the  Lutheran  and  Reformed  congregations  and  hence  no  longer 
exclusively  Lutheran.  The  Reformed  church,  situated  a  few  rods  from  the 
site  of  the  Lutheran,  having  been  started  in  1795,  becoming  dilapidated,  its 
members  made  application  to  the  members  of  the  Lutheran  church  to  unite 
with  them  in  the  formation  of  a  union  church.  Their  application  was  favorably 
received  by  the  Lutherans,  acted  upon,  and  finally  articles  of  agreement  made 
to  sell  half  of  their  rights  and  claims  to  the  Reformed.  This  uriiiappy  state  of 
things  was  brought  about  in  the  year  1833,  at  the  time  when  the  Lutheran 
church  here  was  passing  through  strange  experiences  and  losing  members  on  all 
sides.  Some  left  and  connected  themselves  with  other  Lutheran  congregations 
then  beginning  to  spring  up  in  the  surrounding  neighborhood;  others  left  and 
joined  the  sects  who  were  at  that  time  manifesting  considerable  power  in 
deceiving  and  drawing  away  the  unwary. 

In  the  year  1803  this  congregation,  which  had  been  until  then  supplied, 
united  with  four  others  to  build  a  charge.  This  charge  called  as  its  pastor 
Rev.  John  Knoske,  who  served  it  from  1803  to  181 1,  eight  years.  In  the  year 
181 1,  Rev.  George  Mennig  received  and  accepted  a  call  to  this  pastorate,  and 
labored  in  it  until  1833,  when  he  was  followed  by  Rev.  William  G.  Mennig, 
whose  labor  here  extended  to  the  year  184^.  The  following  are  the  ministers 
who  served  this  congregation  after  William  Mennig:  Nathan  Yeager, 
1845-51;  G.  W.  Scheide,  1852;  Julius  Ehrhardt,  1853-64;  J.  Leonberger, 
1865-69;  G.  F.  Woemer,  1870;  D.  K.  Kepner,  1871-72;  I.  N.  S.  Erb,  1873- 
1888;  H.  A.  Weller,  1889-1911 ;  H.  H.  Krauss,  1912. 

Early  in  the  year  1883  plans  were  undertaken  for  the  building  of  a  new 
church,  and  the  present  church  building  resulted.  On  Aug.  19th  of  this  year 
the  cornerstone  of  the  new  building  was  laid,  sermons  being  preached  by  the 
Revs.  R.  S.  Appel,  Reformed,  and  D.  K.  Kepner,  Lutheran.  On  Jan.  6,  1884, 
the  first  sermon  in  the  new  church  building  was  preached  in  the  basement  by 
the  Lutheran  pastor.  Rev.  I.  N.  S.  Erb;  text,  Luke  ii,  36-37.  The  Reformed 
pastor,  Henry  Leisse,  preached  his  first  sermon  also  in  the  basement,  on  the 
following  Sunday,  Jan.  13th.  The  new  church  building  was  formally  dedi- 
cated on  the  27th  and  28th  days  of  September,  1884. 

lEarly  in  the  year  1905  a  movement  was  set  on  foot  to  observe  the  150th 
anniversary  of  the  founding  of  the  congregation  of  the  Lutheran  church  in 
West  Brunswick.  William  B.  Ketner,  Joseph  A.  Walbom,  Henry  J.  Wagner, 
Francis  L.  Matz,  Jonathan  H.  Walborn  and  Mandon  S.  Fegley  were  duly 
appointed  a  committee  of  arrangements.  Oct.  7  and  8  were  the  days  appointed 
for  the  celebration,  and  printed  invitations  were  issued  to  all  known  descend- 
ants of  the  congregation.  The  Historical  Society  of  Schuylkill  County  was 
invited  to  participate  in  a  body  and  have  charge  of  one  of  the  sessions.  When 
the  appointed  days  had  come  the  results  of  the  devotion  of  the  committee 
became  visible  in  the  great  concourse  of  several  thousand  people  from  near 
and  from  far.  Descendants  of  the  fathers,  now  scattered  over  the  wide  land, 
came  to  spend  the  days  and' participate  in  the  notable  services  which  were  pre- 
pared. On  this  occasion  sermons  were  delivered  by  Rev.  F.  J.  F.  Schantz, 
D.  D.,  Rev.  R.  S.  Apple,  Rev.  W.  D.  Stoyer,  and  addresses  by  Rev.  H.  A. 
Weller,  pastor,  Mr.  John  N.  Heim,  Hon.  D.  C^  Henning,  Rev.  J.  H.  Umbenhen, 
Ph.  D.,  Rev.  J.  H.  Eastman,  D.  D.,  Rev.  S.  L.  Whitmore,  D.  D.,  Rev.  W.  F. 
Rentz,  Rev.  Carl  G.  Karsch,  Rev.  Henry  Leisse. 

The  pipe-organ  originally  dedicated  Oct.  16,  1808,  and  which  has  served 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  793 

the  congregation  all  these  years,  is  still  in  active  service  each  Lord's  Day,  and 
has  as  sweet  and  melodious  a  tone  as  any  of  modem  make. 

The  Sunday  school  rooms  are  at  the  present  time  being  improved  and  gas- 
lights are  being  installed.  There  are  active  Ladies'  Aid  and  Missionary  Socie- 
ties connected  with  the  congregation.  The  congregation  has  just  approved 
and  adopted  the  **duplex  envelope,"  has  a  graded  Sunday  school,  and  is  in  a 
prosperous  condition.    The  congregation  is  old  in  years  but  young  in  activity. 

GEORGE  W.  WALTER,  of  Tamaqua,  is  a  business  man  of  good  stand- 
ing and  also  respected  for  his  personal  character,  in  which  he  shows  the  traits 
which  have  been  typical  of  his  family  in  all  the  time  it  has  been  identified  with 
the  borough.  Its  members  have  always  ranked  with  the  substantial  element, 
doing  their  duty  as  citizens  and  proving  themselves  reliable  in  all  the  rela- 
tions of  life. 

John  C.  Walter,  grandfather  of  George  W.  Walter,  was  bom  in  Stiitt- 
gart,  Germany,  and  spent  his  early  life  there.  Coming  to  America  when  a 
young  man  he  settled  at  Tamaqua,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  engaged  in 
the  butcher  business,  carrying  it  on  successfully  until  his  untimely  death, 
in  1856,  when  he  was  but  forty-two  years  old.  He  was  killed  by  a  cannon 
used  at  the  celebration  in  honor  of  President  Buchanan's  election,  and  is 
buried  at  Tamaqua.  His  wife,  whose  maiden  name  was  Fredericka  Gephart, 
was  also  bom  in  Germany,  and  came  to  America  when  a  child.  Their  fam- 
ily consisted  of  the  following  children :  John  C. ;  Rosie,  who  married  John  E. 
Tiley;  Emma,  who  married  Levi  Stagerwalt;  Mary,  who  married  Michael 
Bonshoff ;  and  Gottlieb,  who  died  when  six  years  old. 

John  C.  Walter,  son  of  John  C.  and  Fredericka  (Gephart)  Walter,  was 
bom  Dec.  18,  1849,  ^^  Port  Carbon,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  was  one  year 
old  when  brought  to  Tamaqua,  where  he  has  since  resided.  In  his  youth  he 
clerked  for  a  time  in  a  store  for  Mr.  Lutz,  and  was  afterwards  a  freight 
conductor  on  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  road,  remaining  in  the  employ  of 
the  railway  company  for  five  years.  In  1874  he  embarked  in  the  freight  and 
express  business  on  his  own  account  in  Tamaqua,  and  he  has  continued  the 
same  successfully  since,  having  a  profitable  patronage  in  and  around  the 
borough.  In  1890  he  purchased  the  livery  business  of  Shiverstine  &  Glass- 
moyer,  which  he  has  carried  on  up  to  the  present  in  connection  with  his  orig- 
inal line.  His  place  of  business  is  at  the  rear  of  the  "United  States  Hotel." 
Mr.  Walter  has  mingled  in  local  politics  and  government  to  a  considerable 
extent,  being  well  known  as  an  effective  worker  in  the  Republican  party.  He 
has  been  elected  to  several  offices,  having  served  as  a  member  of  the  Tamaqua 
school  board  and  as  high  constable  of  Tamaqua,  having  filled  the  latter  office 
for  the  last  seventeen  years.  In  191 2  he  was  a  candidate  for  the  lower  house 
of  the  State  Legislature,  but  was  defeated,  losing  by  only  ninety-six  votes. 
In  the  social  orders  he  is  well  known,  belonging  to  the  Improved  Order  of 
Red  Men,  Independent  Americans  and  Citizens'  Fire  Company,  of  which 
latter  he  was  a  charter  member.  The  family  are  Methodists  in  religious 
connection. 

Mr.  Walter  married  Lavina  Wagner,  daughter  of  Michael  Wagner,  who 
was  the  first  to  engage  in  the  express  and  freight  business  at  Tamaqua;  he 
died  when  eighty-two  years  old.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Walter  have  had  a  large  fam- 
ily: William,  who  lives  at  Tamaqua;  John,  deceased;  George  W. ;  Sarah, 
who  married  Olive  Folweiller,  of  Tamaqua;   Harry,  of   Philadelphia,   Pa.; 


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794  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Mary,  who  married  Harold  Yost  and  is  living  in  Reading,  Pa.;  Harold, 
deceased;  Clara  B.,  wife  of  Irvin  Rex,  living  at  Mauch  Chunk,  Pa.;  twins 
who  died  when  six  months  old ;  Samuel,  of  Tamaqua ;  and  Curtis,  of  Tamaqua. 

George  W.  Walter,  son  of  John  C.  and  Lavina  (Wagner)  Walter,  was 
bom  at  Tamaqua  in  1877  and  has  spent  all  his  life  there.  His  education  was 
acquired  in  the  public  schools,  and  he  began  business  life  a^  a  clerk,  being  so 
engaged  for  ten  years.  He  has  since  been  with  his  father  in  the  livery  busi- 
ness, in  which  he  has  become  thoroughly  experienced,  and  much  of  the  pres- 
ent prosperity  of  the  enterprise  may  be  attributed  to  his  energetic  methods 
and  prompt  attention  to  patrons,  who  appreciate  the  obliging  and  efficient 
service  which  the  Walters  have  always  endeavored  to  render  to  their  cus- 
tomers. Like  his  father  Mr.  Walter  is  a  stanch  Republican  and  has  taken 
some  active  part  in  local  politics.  He  served  three  years  as  borough  auditor. 
He  is  a  member  of  the  B.  P.  O.  Elks,  of  the  I.  O.  O.  F.  and  Encampment, 
and  of  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A. 

Mr.  Walter  married  Annie  Brodbeck,  of  Tamaqua,  daughter  of  George 
Brodbeck.    They  have  two  children,  Donald  and  Ethyl. 

JARED  HAFER  owns  the  large  farm  in  East  Brunswick  township  on 
which  he  resides,  but  he  is  not  now  actively  engaged  in  its  operation,  having 
practically  retired.  Most  of  his  mature  life  has  been  spent  in  this  portion  of 
Schuylkill  county,  but  he  is  a  native  of  Berks  county.  Pa.,  bom  March  11, 
1842,  in  Upper  Bern  township.  The  name  Hafer  is  an  old  one  in  that  county. 
One  Matthias  Hafer  settled  there,  a  mile  east  of  Reading,  in  Alsace  town- 
ship, upon  his  emigration  to  this  country  from  the  Province  of  Alsace,  on 
the  borders  of  the  Rhine.  He  carried  on  farming  until  his  decease.  His 
wife  was  Julia  Schmid,  and' they  had  eight  children,  seven  sons  and  one 
daughter,  namely:  John,  Matthias,  George,  Benjamin,  Isaac,  Daniel,  Henry 
and  Maria  (Mrs.  Jacob  Hill).  We  do  not  know  whether  the  son  Daniel 
was  the  grandfather  of  Jared  Hafer  or  not. 

Daniel  Hafer,  grandfather  of  Jared,  was  born  in  Oley  township,  Berks 
county,  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  all  his  life,  and  died  when  over  seventy- 
seven  years  old.  His  children  were:  Nathan  married  Rebecca  Blatt;  Daniel 
married  Polly  Spatz;  Samuel  married  a  Miss  Reeser;  Jacob  is  mentioned 
below;  Julia  married  Jacob ^oak;  Polly  married  Samuel  Dunkelberger.  The 
parents  are  buried  at  Bellman's  Church  in  Berks  county.  Daniel  Hafer  was 
a  member  of  Spiess's  German  Reformed  Church  in  that  county,  and  highly 
respected  as  a  good  Christian  man.  Politically  he  supported  the  Democratic 
party. 

Jacob  Hafer,  son  of  Daniel,  was  born  in  Oley  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa- 
in April,  1806,  and  died  in  Febmary,  1879.  He  worked  for  his  father  until 
he  was  twenty- four  years  of  age,  and  learned  the  weaver's  trade,  but  though 
he  followed  it  for  many  years  he  also  continued  farm  work.  He  owned  a 
tract  of  twenty  acres  in  Center  township,  Berks  county,  which  he  operated 
while  working  at  his  trade,  and  on  selling  this  tract  removed  to  Bern  town- 
ship, Berks  county,  where  he  tenanted  different  farms  until  his  death.  He 
also  taught  German  in  the  schools  of  that  township.  He  served  his  fellow 
citizens  in  the  township  offices  of  supervisor  and  assessor,  and  also  as  elec- 
tion inspector,  taking  a  close  interest  in  politics  as  an  ardent  member  of 
the  Democratic  party.  His  religious  connection  was  with  Bellman's  German  Re- 
formed Church,  where  he  and  his  wife,  Catherine  (Koch),  are  buried.    She 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  795 


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was  a  native  of  Center  township,  Berks  county,  daughter  of  Jacob  Koch. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Hafer  were  the  parents  of  these  children:  Levi  married  Kate 
Ludwig,  and  both  are  deceased;  Jacob  married  Mary  Matz,  and  both  are 
deceased;  Daniel  married  Anna  Weinholt,  and  both  are  deceased;  Abraham 
died  young;  Levina  married  Eli  Daubert,  and  both  are  deceased;  Jared  is 
mentioned  below;  Catherine,  deceased,  married  Charles  Baltser. 

Jared  Hafer  was  educated  in  the  public  schools  of  Berks  county  and 
was  reared  to  agricultural  life,  working  out  among  farmers  until  he  was  fif- 
teen years  old.  He  also  assisted  his  father,  to  whom  he  gave  aU  his  earnings 
until  he  was  twenty-four  years  of  age.  When  he  married  he  located  at  New 
Ringgold,  Schuylkill  county,  and  was  engaged  at  the  washery  near  by  for 
about  six  months.  Then  he  removed  to  West  Perni  township,  this  county,  and 
bought  a  tract  of  fifty-four  acres  and  the  mill  now  owned  by  John  F.  Staudt. 
He  developed  this  property,  remodeled  the  mill,  built  a  sawmill,  and  operated 
that  place  for  about  eleven  years,  until  he  removed  to  his  present  tract  in 
East  Brunswick  township,  having  bought  the  same,  260  acres,  from  Lewis 
Audenried.  Of  this  100  acres  are  under  cultivation.  Mr.  Hafer  has  made 
numerous  improvements  on  the  place,  remodeled  the  dwelling  house,  and 
erected  many  outbuildings,  all  the  surroundings  bearing  witness  to  his  suc- 
cess and  thrift.  He  carried  on  general  farming,  and  though  now  practically 
retired  still  markets  his  products  once  a  week  to  Tamaqua.  His  progressive 
disposition  and  public  spirit  have  been  manifested  chiefly  in  his  interest  in 
school  affairs,  for  which  he  worked  zealously  during  his  term  of  three  years 
as  school  director.  In  politics  he  adheres  to  the  Democratic  party.  Mr.  Hafer 
was  formerly  a  member  of  Washington  Camp  No.  100,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  of 
New  Ringgold,  and  of  the  Odd  Fellows  lodge  in  West  Penn  township.  He 
belongs  to  Zion's  Reformed  Church  in  West  Penn  township,  at  one  time  held 
the  office  of  deacon,  and  was  committeeman  of  Weaver's  Sunday  school  in 
East  Brunswick  township. 

Mr.  Hafer  married  Catherine  Osenbach,  a  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Kate 
(Dreisbach)  Osenbach,  and  we  have  the  following  record  of  their  large  fam- 
ily: (i)  Daniel  Jacob,  bom  Oct.  16,  1866,  married  Annie  Trexel,  and  they 
reside  at  Reading,  Pa.  Their  children  are  Edith,  Ruth,  Mary,  Erma  and 
Grace.  (2)  Kate  Isabella,  bom  Feb.  4,  1868,. had  one  child  (now  deceased), 
by  her  first  husband,  Charles  D.  Rapp.  After  his  death  she  married  (second) 
Elmer  Diener,  and  they  live  in  East  Brunswick  township.  (3)  Jared  Milton, 
bom  Nov.  18,  1869,  lives  in  Rush  township,  Schuylkill  county.'  He  married 
Rosie  Hoppes,  and  they,  have  had  children  as  follows :  One  that  died  in 
infancy,  Elma  (deceased).  Bertha,  Cora,  Raymond,  Nathan,  Calvin,  Oliver, 
Mary,  Eva,  Abner  and  Mildred.  (4)  Anna  Rebecca,  born  July  13,  1871, 
married  Lewis  Gerber,  and  they  have  had  two  children,  one  that  died  young 
and  Mary.  They  reside  in  West  Penn  township.  (5)  A  son  born  Jan.  14, 
1873,  is  deceased.  (6)  Sarah  Alice,  bom  Dec.  24,  1873,  is  the  wife  of  Charles 
Hoppes,  of  West  Penn  township.  Their  children  are  Alvin,  Jennie,  one 
deceased,  Leon  and  Raymond.  (7)  Freddie  Edwin,  bom  Feb.  21,  1875,  niar- 
ried  Mary  Zellner,  and  has  one  child,  Elsie  May.  Their  home  is  in  East 
Brunswick  township.  (8)  Moses  William,  bom  May  13,  1876.  is  deceased. 
(9)  Calvin,  bom  Sept.  28,  1877,  is  unmarried.  (10)  Caroline,  bom  May  16, 
1879,  married  Heniy  Weaver,  of  East  Bmnswick  township,  (ii)  A  son 
bom  Dec.  6,  1881,  is  deceased.  (12)  Samuel  Aaron,  bom  May  19,  1883,  is 
unmarried.     (13)  Frank  Howard,  bom  Aug.  28,  1884,  married  Katie  Baer, 


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796  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

and  their  children  are  Florence,  Leroy,  Stella  and  Dorothy.  They  live  in 
Reading,  Pa.  (14)  Clara  Agnes,  bom  July  5,  1886,  is  deceased.  (15)  Mary 
Levina,  born  Sept.  15,  1888,  is  unmarried.  (16)  Jennie  May,  bom  March  22, 
1890,  is  deceased.     (17)  Eva  Minerva,  bom  July  2T,  1893,  is  unmarried. 

Mrs.  Catherine  (Osenbach)  Hafer  was  bom  Feb.  17,  1850,  in  East 
Bmnswick  township,  was  educated  there,  and  lived  at  home  until  her  mar- 
riage. She  is  a  daughter  of  Daniel  Osenbach  and  granddaughter  of  Christian 
Osenbach,  of  East  Bmnswick  township.  He  followed  farming  and  charcoal 
buming  all  his  life,  dying  when  about  sixty  years  old.  -  His  wife,  Catherine 
(Gottshall),  died  in  May,  1874,  aged  ninety-seven  years,  and  they  are  buried 
at  the  Frieden's  Church  in  Kew  Ringgold.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Lutheran 
congregation  there,  and  served  faithfully  as  deacon.  On  political  questions 
he  was  a  Democrat.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Osenbach  had  a  large  family,  but  the 
names  of  several  of  their  children  are  not  obtainable.  We  have  record  of 
the  following:  Daniel  was  the  father  of  Mrs.  Hafer;  Christian  married 
Sarah  Gottshall,  and  both  are  deceased ;  William  married  Brigetta  Kemmerer, 
who  is  deceased;  John  married  a  Miss  Halderman,  and  both  are  deceased; 
Joseph  married  Mary  Beableheimer,  who  is  deceased;  Kate  married  Daniel 
Bankes,  and  after  his  death  a  Mr.  Snyder,  and  they  are  now  deceased;  Mary 
married  John  Baer,  and  both  are  deceased;  Sarah  married  John  Kemmerer, 
who  is  deceased;  Susanna  married  Charles  Beableheimer. 

Daniel  Osenbach,  father  of  Mrs.  Jared  Hafer,  was  bom  Feb.  5,  1819,  in 
East  Bmnswick  township,  and  died  in  that  township  in  November,  1882. 
He  was  reared  and  educated  in  East  Brunswick  township,  leamed  the  wheel- 
wright's trade,  and  farmed  for  many  years.  He  and  his  son-in-law,  Jared 
Hafer,  owned  *  farms  together  in  West  Penn  township,  and  came  to  East 
Bmnswick  township  together.  Mr.  Osenbach  owned  forty-three  acres  of 
the  original  260  acres  in  the  Hafer  farm,  which  he  later  traded  for  another 
piece  of  land;  this  tract  of  forty-three  acres  is  now  owned  by  Mr.  Elmer 
Diener.  Mr.  Osenbach  had  a  shop  on  his  farm  and  followed  his  trade  along 
with  farming.  He  was  a  Democrat,  and  kept  in  touch  with  local  politics 
and  public  matters,  was  elected  to  the  offices  of  school  director  and  super- 
visor,^ and  served  his  fellow  citizens  capably  in  both.  Church  work  was 
always  one  of  his  chief  interests,  and  he  was  very  active  as  a  member  of 
the  Frieden's  Lutheran  Church  at  New  Ringgold,  which  he  served  as  deacon. 
Mr.  Osenbach  married  Catherine  Dreisbach,  who  was  born  Oct.  31,  1817, 
and  died  when  over  seventy  years  of  age.  She  is  buried  with  her  husband 
in  West  Penn  township,  Schuylkill  county.  Children  as  follows  were  bom 
to  them:  Carolina  married  Aaron  Schrack  (deceased)  and  (second)  John  F. 
Staudt;  Rebecca  died  when  nine  years  old;  Catherine  is  Mrs.  Jared  Hafer; 
two  childred  died  unnamed. 

FREDERICK  W.  BRACHMAN,  of  Tuscarora,  has  spent  all  his  life 
in  that  section  of  Schuylkill  county  and  is  deservedly  held  in  esteem  as  one 
of  its  most  creditable  citizens.  By  diligence  and  the  most  honorable  methods 
he  has  made  his  way  up  until  he  is  now  one  of  the  notably  successful  busi- 
ness men  of  his  locality.  The  large  wholesale  and  retail  meat  trade  which 
he  commands  has  been  developed  through  his  judgment  and  foresight,  which 
have  never  been  at  fault  in  estimating  the  opportunities  of  the  re^on  in  which 
his  operations  have  been  carried  on.     His  faith  in  local  possibilities  has  not 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  797 

only  given  him  the  courage  to  branch  out  in  his  own  enterprise,  but  has  been 
a  factor  in  encouraging  other  activities. 

Mr.  Brachman  is  a  native  of  Brockton,  Schuylkill  county,  born  April  6, 
1866,  son  of  the  late  Frederick  W.  and  Margaret  (Gross)  Brachman.  The 
father  was  bom  in  Germany  July  13,  1823,  and  spent  his  early  years  in  that 
country,  coming  to  the  United  States  when  a  young  man  of  nineteen.  He  was 
one  of  the  first  settlers  at  Patterson  (now  Broclrton  post  office),  in  Schuyl- 
kill township,  Schuylkill,  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  spent  the  rest  of  his  life,  at  first 
doing  mine  work  there,  until  1864.  Then  he  engaged  in  the  hotel  business, 
which  he  continued  until  his  death,  Sept.  18,  18&.  He  is  buried  in  the 
Lutheran  cemetery  at  Middleport.  A  man  of  intelligence  and  progressive 
ideas,  he  took  a  genuine  interest  in  the  welfare  of  the  community  and  the 
proper  administration  of  local  government,  and  himself  served  as  tax  col- 
lector and  school  director,  holding  the  latter  office  for  many  years.  He  was  a 
Lutheran  in  religious  doctrine.  Mrs.  Brachman  died  March  20,  1910,  and  is 
buried  at  Brockton.  They  were  the  parents  of  the  following  children :  Caro- 
line died  in  infancy;  Kate  married  Richard  McBreen;  John  is  a  nesident  of 
Middleport,  this  county;  Mary  is  married  to  Frank  Wadlinger;  Sophia  mar- 
ried Fred  Krantz;  Peter  is  a  resident  of  Tamaqua,  this  county;  Lena  (de- 
ceased) was  the  wife  of  the  late  Peter  L.  Hoffman;  Frederick  W.  is  next  in 
the  family;  Margaret  (deceased)  was  the  wife  of  Lewis  Lawrence,  district 
superintendent  for  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Company,  at 
Shenandoah,  Pa.;  Matilda  married  Michael  J.  Hoffman;  Emma  married 
Michael  Bonenberger;  Harry  J.  is  a  business  man  of  Brockton. 

Frederick  W.  Brachman  received  a  public  school  education  at  Brockton. 
Until  he  was  twenty  years  old  he  was  employed  about  the  collieries,  beginning 
as  a  slate  picker  at  the  Boston  Run  breaker.  Then  he  went  to  work  for 
Charles  Miller,  a  butcher  at  Tuscarora,  with  whom  he  had  been  engaged 
but  one  year  when  he  and  his  brother  Peter  bought  out  Mr.  Miller,  conduct- 
ing the  business  under  the  name  of  Brachman  Brothers.  They  carried  it  on 
in  partnership  until  1907,  when  Frederick  W.  Brachman  purchased  his  broth- 
er's interest,  and  he  has  continued  it  since  as  sole  proprietor.  Under  his 
management  it  has  been  increasing  steadily,  his  trade  now  extending  all  over 
the  territory  adjacent  to  Brockton.  Mr.  Brachman  has  forged  ahead  by  strict 
application  to  the  building  up  of  h;s  business,  but  he  has  found  time  also  to 
serve  his  fellow  citizens  in  public  trusts,  having  been  a  member  of  the  board 
of  school  directors  in  Schuylkill  township  for  nine  years;  he  was  president 
of  that  body,  and  also  treasurer  for  four  years.  On  political  questions  he 
has  stood  with  the  Republican  party.  At  one  time  Mr.  Brachman  was  a 
member  of  the  Elks  lodge  at  Tamaqua. 

Mr.  Brachman  married  Sarah  Schroner,  daughter  of  Daniel  Schroner,  of 
Lewistown,  Schuylkill  county,  and  children  as  follows  have  been  bom  to 
them:  Ida,  now  the  wife  of  William  DeLay;  Margaret;  Fredericka,  who 
died  when  three  and  a  half  years  old;  Harry;  Herbert';  Lloyd;  Norman; 
Beatrice,  and  Ruth.  Mr.  Brachman  and  his  family  have  their  religious  con- 
nection with  the  Reformed  denomination. 

BENJAMIN  J.  YOST,  who  is  now  holding  the  honorable  position  of 
chief  burgess  in  Tamaqua  borough,  is  an  official  of  proved  fidelity  and  trust- 
worthiness, favorably  known  in  the  several  sectibns  of  Schuylkill  county 
where  he  has  resided.     He  is  himself  a  native  of  Potts ville,  this  county,  a 


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798  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

son  of  Benjamin  K.  Yost,  and  belongs  to  a  family  whose  members  have  long 
been  respected  for  their  adherence  to  high  principles  and  upright  lives. 

The  Yost  family  is  of  old  standing  in  Pennsylvania.  Daniel  Yost,  great- 
grandfather of  Benjamin  J.  Yost,  was  bom  in  Montgomery  county.  Pa.,  in 
1759,  and  removed  at  an  early  day  to  what  is  now  McKeansburg,  Schuylkill 
county,  where  he  died  in  1839.  He  was  an  activ,e,  enterprising  man  in  his 
day.  A  Whig  in  political  faith,  he  always  interested  himself  in  public  affairs, 
believing  it  the  duty  of  every  good  citizen  to  protect  and  foster  the  common 
good,  and  he  stood  deservedly  high  in  the  community,  not  only  because  of 
his  honorable  character  but  also  for  his  intelligence  and  good  judgment.  He 
was  called  to  various  positions  of  trust,  being  justice  of  the  peace  for  a 
number  of  years  in  his  township,  and  discharged  the  duties  of  the  office  with 
such  marked  ability  and  signal  impartiality  to  all  c6ncemed  that  he  was  called 
up  higher,  being  elected  associate  judge  of  the  county.  Judge  Yost  married 
Barbara  Hillogus,  and  they  had  a  family  of  ten  children. 

Jonathan  Yost,  son  of  Daniel,  was  born  in  Montgomery  county,  Pa.,  in 
1797,  and  died  in  East  Brunswick  township,  Schuylkill  county,  in  1866.  He 
came  to  this  county  with  his  father,  learned  the  blacksmith's  trade,  and  fol- 
lowed it  a  number  of  years,  but  gave  it  up  to  go  farming,  which  was  his 
work  during  the  last  twenty  years  of  his  life.  He  was  an  active  and  ardent 
member  of  the  German  Reformed  Church  at  McKeansburg,  serving  in  nearly 
all  the  official  positions  in  the  church  organization.  He  married  Mary  Kleck- 
ner,  a  daughter  of  Andrew  Kleckner,  one  of  the  earlier  emigrants  from  Ger- 
many into  East  Brunswick  township,  this  county,  where  he  followed  farming 
and  where  he  died.  To  this  union  were  bom  twelve  children,  six  sons  and  six 
daughters. 

Benjamin  K.  Yost,  son  of  Jonathan,  was  bom  in  Schuylkill  county.  He 
learned  the  trade  of  shoemaker,  and  later  operated  the  "Rising  Sun  Hotel" 
at  Pottsville.  For  a  time  he  was  located  near  New  Philadelphia,  this  county, 
lived  for  three  years  at  McKeansburg,  and  in  1861  went  to  Mahanoy  City, 
removing  thence  to  Lofty,  where  he  resided  for  three  years.  He  then  spent 
six  months  at  Reading  before  he  settled  at  Shenandoah,  Schuylkill  county, 
where  he  carried  on  the  hotel  business,  and  later  the  shoe  business,  until  his 
death.  He  is  buried  at  McKeansburg,  this  county.  Mr.  Yost  was  a  member 
of  the  Masonic  fratemity.  Five  children  were  born  to  his  marriage  with 
Mary  Wagner,  namely:  Jonathan:  S.  W.,  who  died  in  June,  1914  (he  was 
cashier  of  the  Shenandoah  National  Bank)  ;  Oscar,  who  died  in  191 5;  Mary, 
who  is  living  with  her  mother  in  Pennsylvania;  and  Benjamin  J. 

Benjamin  J.  Yost  was  bom  Aug.  20,  1853.  He  received  his  education  in 
the  public  schools,  principally  at  Shenandoah,  and  during  his  youth  clerked 
for  some  time  in  a  store  there,  also  leaming  the  trade  of  barber.  Soon  after 
this  he  turned  his  attention  to  the  work  of  organizing  camps  for  the  Patriotic 
Order  Sons  of  America,  in  Schuylkill,  Union,  Centre,  Snyder,  Clinton,  Clear- 
field and  Columbia  counties,  and  was  so  engaged  for  a  period  of  eighteen 
months,  meeting  with  notable  success.  Returning  to  his  trade  he  followed  it 
for  a  few  years,  until  appointed  deputy  clerk  of  the  Schuylkill  county  courts, 
in  which  position  he  served  one  term.  After  that  he  resumed  his  trade  at 
Shenandoah  for  two  years,  until  he  took  charge  of  the  "Lakeside  Hotel'*  at 
Lakeside,  Pa.,  which  he  carried  on  for  eleven  years.  For  another  year  he 
was  in  the  restaurant  business  at  Lansford,  Pa.,  in  September,  191 1,  coming 
to  Tamaqua  and  going  back  to  his  trade.     In  June,  1914,  he  was  appointed 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  799 

chief  burgess  of  the  borough,  by  the  Schuylkill  county  courts,  and  he  is 
giving  faithful  attention  to  the  duties  of  this  responsible  office,  striving  earn- 
estly to  promote  the  best  interests  of  his  town  and  fellow  townsmen.  Mr. 
Yost  made  an  excellent  record  in  his  previous  public  service,  having  acted 
as  health  officer  of  Rush  and  Ryon  townships,  this  county ;  as  deputy  coroner ; 
and  for  seven  years  as  a  member  of  the  council  in  Shenandoah. 

Mr.  Yost  has  always  kept  up  his  active  connection  with  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A. 
He  holds  membership  in  Washington  Camp  No.  112,  of  Shenandoah,  has 
served  as  State  marshal,  and  has  attended  twenty  State  and  National  con- 
ventions. 

Mr.  Yost  was  united  in  marriage  with  Martha  R.  Kohler,  who  died  in 
June,  1914,  and  by  whom  he  had  the  following  children:  Robert,  Gertrude, 
Martha,  Emma  and  Edgar. 

WILLIAM  R.  BUCKLEY,  M.  D.,  one  of  the  younger  physicians  in  prac- 
tice at  Schuylkill  county,  is  now  acting  as  first  assistant  surgeon  in  the  Stale 
hospital  at  Fountain  Springs,  with  which  institution  he  has  been  associated 
since  his  graduation,  in  1913.  Dr.  Buckley  was  bom  at  Girardville,  this  county, 
March  10,  1886,  son  of  William  and  Mary  (Horan)  Buckley. 

William  Buckley,  the  father,  was  bom  in  the  Mill  Creek  district,  near 
PottsviHe,  Schuylkill  county.  His  father,  Peter  Buckley,  a  native  of  Ireland, 
had  settled  there  upon  coming  to  this  country.  He  remained  there  until  his 
death,  working  as  an  engineer  at  the  mines.  William  Buckley  came  to 
Girardville  when  nineteen  years  old,  and  has  been  a  resident  of  that  place 
ever  since.  He  has  been  engaged  in  mine  work  all  his  life,  for  years  serving 
as  superintendent  and  outside  foreman  at  the  Otto  colliery,  near  Girard- 
ville, one  of  the  large  coal  workings  in  Schuylkill  county.  His  wife  was  bom 
at  Minersville,  this  county,  daughter  of  Thomas  Horan,  who  was  born  in 
Ireland  and  came  to  the  United  States  at  an  early  date,  living  for  a  time  at 
Minersville  and  later  moving  to  Girardville,  where  he  conducted  a  hotel.  He 
also  served  as  tax  collector  of  the  latter  place,  and  died  there.  Mr.  and  Mrs. 
William  Buckley  have  had  a  family  of  nine  children:  Catherine,  who  is  the 
wife  of  B.  J.  Duify,  an  attorney,  of  Coaldale,  Schuylkill  county;  Thomas  V., 
a  physician  and  surgeon,  located  at  Lansford,  Carbon  Co.,  Pa.;  William  R.; 
John,  deceased;  Mary,  who  is  engaged  in  teaching  school  at  Branchdale,  this 
county ;  Ella,  also  a  teacher,  at  present  engaged  at  Bridgeton,  N.  J. ;  Florence, 
Walter  and  Edwin,  at  home. 

William  R.  Buckley  obtained  his  preparatory  education  at  Girardville.  In 
1909  he  entered  the  Medico-Chimrgical  College,  at  Philadelphia,  and  com- 
pleted the  course  in  1912,  graduating  with  the  degree  of  M.  D.  Shortly  after- 
wards he  was  appointed  a  member  of  the  staff  of  the  State  hospital  at  Fountain 
Springs,  in  his  native  county,  and  he  has  since  been  appointed  first  assistant 
surgeon  at  that  institution,  which  position  he  now  holds.  It  affords  exceptional 
facilities  for  experience,  and  Dr.  Buckley's  training  has  been  such  as  to  enable 
him  to  take  advantage  of  this.  Though  he  is  just  at  the  outset  of  his  career 
he  has  already  gained  the  reputation  oi  being  a  thoroughly  reliable  surgeon, 
and  his  personal  qualities  as  well  as  his  professional  attainments  are  such  that 
he  has  every  promise  of  a  useful  and  successful  future.  He  is  a  member  of 
the  Schuylkill  County  Medical  Society,  the  State  Medical  Society  and  the 
American   Medical   Association.     Socially  he  belongs   to   Sheridan   Council, 


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800  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Knights  of  Columbus,  for  which  or^nization  he  is  medical  examiner.     In 
religious  faith  he  is  a  Catholic,  belonging  to  St.  Joseph's  Church. 

JOHN  GREGORY  (deceased),  of  Shenandoah,  son  of  Simon  and  Han- 
nah (Webb)  Gregory,  was  bom  Nov.  30,  1861,  at  Wadesville,  Schuylkill 
county.  He  attended  schools  at  Wadesville  and  Shenandoah,  but  his  oppor- 
tunities were  limited,  for  at  the  age  of  nine  years  he  began  picking  slate  at 
Shenandoah,  working  at  this  for  one  year,  when  he  left  to  take  a  position  as 
clerk  in  the  hardware  store  of  Mr.  Leuburg,  at  Shenandoah.  In  that  store 
he  remained  until  the  year  1894,  when  he  finally  decided  to  enter  business  him- 
self. Not  having  sufficient  capital  he  succeeded  in  interesting  H.  W.  Titman  to 
venture  with  him  into  the  business  world  as  a  partner,  and  on  June  4,  1894, 
they  deposited  in  the  Merchants'  National  Bank  an  equal  sum  of  money  for 
the  purpose  of  transacting  business  as  above  stated,  the  earnings  of  said  com- 
pany to  be  equally  divided,  John  Gregory  serving  as  manager  for  the  con- 
cern, which  was  known  as  "The  City  Supply  Co."  On  July  3,  1906,  H.  W. 
Titman  sold  his  interest  to  John  Gregory,  wiping  out  the  firm  of  the  City 
Supply  Co.  and  leaving  John  Gregory  the  sole  owner.  Under  his  capable 
management  he  built  up  a  large  wholesale  and  retail  hardware  business,  and 
contributed  his  share  towards  establishing  the  high  modem  standards  of  busi- 
ness now  characteristic  of  commercial  life  in  the  borough  of  Shenandoah, 
where  all  of  his  active  years  were  spent.  Though  he  started  out  without 
means,  Mr.  (Gregory  won  his  way  steadily  forward  to  a  prominent  position 
among  local  merchants,  and  by  his  sterling  personal  traits  came  to  hold  an 
equally  high  place  in  social  relations.  His  business  operations  have  left  a 
permanent  impression  of  improved  conditions  in  mercantile  interests  in  the 
community.  On  Sept.  i,  1913,  while  out  automobiling,  he  had  an  accident, 
receiving  injuries  which  resulted  in  his  death  Oct.  17,  1913. 

Mr.  Gregory  was  beloved  as  well  as  respected.,  It  has  been  said  that  he 
never  had  any  enemies.  High-minded,  just  and  sensible,  he  displayed  most 
excellent  qualities  in  all  his  associations,  was  esteemed  for  his  goodness  and 
kindness,  and  admired  for  his  notable  accomplishments  in  business.  With  his 
wife  he  belonged  to  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Church  in  Shenandoah,  and  took 
a  genuine  interest  in  its  work,  serving  as  librarian  of  the  Sunday  schooL 
Fraternally  he  belonged  to  the  Odd  Fellows,  holding  membership  in  the  lodge 
at  Shenandoah.  He  was  one  of  the  directors  of  the  Merchants'  National 
Bank  of  Shenandoah  and  took  an  active  part  in  its  development. 

On  Sept.  22,  1885,  Mr.  Gregory  married  Eliza  R.  Evans,  and  of  the 
•  children  bom  to  this  marriage  four  reached  maturity ;  Dollie  E.,  who  is  actively 
engaged  in  managing  her  father's  hardware  business ;  Lillie  M.,  who  is  attend- 
ing the  Peirce  Business  College  in  Philadelphia ;  Harold  J.,  who  is  in  the  mili- 
tary school  at  Wenonah,  N.  J. ;  and  Ruth  M.,  in  school  at  home. 

Mr.  Gregory's  parents  were  natives  of  England  and  his  father  was  a  mine 
foreman  in  the  local  anthracite  fields.  He  met  his  death,  on  the  evening  of 
Sept.  I,  1880,  through  the  agency  of  an  explosion  of  a  quantity  of  an  unknown 
explosive  gas,  while  on  duty  at  the  Kehley  Run  colliery,  Shenandoah,  Pa.  He 
had  three  brothers  and  onp  sister,  all  born  in  England,  John,  Richard,  Mary 
and  Elsia. 

Mr.  Gregory's  mother,  Hannah  (Webb)  Gregory,  bom  in  September, 
1836,  was  the  daughter  of  John  Webb,  who  came  to  this  country  from  Eng- 
land.   He  worked  as  a  laborer  and  driver  at  the  colliery,  serving  also  as 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  801 

stable  boss,  and  died  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years.  He  married  in  England 
Elizabeth  Miles,  and  they  had  five  diildren,  the  eldest,  Charles  Webb,  born 
in  1834;  Hannah  was  bom  ina836;  William,  born  in  1839,  was  killed  at  Raven 
Rim;  Geoige,  bom  in  1841,  died  at  Wadesville;  Henry  John  was  bom  in 
1854.  The  only  surviving  member  of  this  family  is  Mrs.  Hannah  (Webb) 
Gregory,  mother  of  John  Gregory.  She  has  had  six  children:  Lillie  (de- 
ceased), William,  George,  Emma,  John  (deceased)  and  Alfred  S. 

Lot  Franklin  and  Phoebe  Evans,  grandparents  of  Mrs.  John  Gregory,  were 
both  of  Quaker  stock.  They  had  children  as  follows :  Thomas,  now  a  clerk 
in  his  son's  store  in  St.  Clair,  Schuylkill  county;  Baldwin,  who  clerks  in  a 
store  at  Glen  Carbon,  and  is  a  shipper  at  the  Pine  Forest  colliery;  Frank, 
now  deceased,  who  was  mine  boss  at  Pine  Forest;  Elizabeth,  who  married 
John  Bowen,  superintendent  of  one  of  the  mine  districts  of  the  Philadelphia 
&  Reading  Coal  &  Iron  Comiwiny;  Sarah,  who  married  Austin  Darrah  (they 
are  deceased)  ;  and  Lot  Franklin.    All  had  families. 

Lot  FraiJclin  Evans,  fathjer  of  Mrs.  Gregory,  was  bom  in  Chester  county. 
Pa.,  and  was  engaged  as  a  stationary  engineer  at  colliery  No.  2,  Lost  Creek, 
near  Shenandoah.  He  married  EUzabeth  Hammer,  and  they  had  a  family  of 
ten  children,  viz.:  (i)  Clara  married  Ambrose  Titus,  a  mine  engineer,  of 
St.  Clair,  and  they  had  children,  Edward  and  Benjamin.  The  parents  are 
deceased.     (2)    Albert,   a  carpet   weaver,   of   Shenandoah,   never  married. 

(3)  Phoebe,  unmarried,  lives  at  Shenandoah  with  her  sister,  Mrs.  Gregory. 

(4)  Isabella  died  unmarried.  (5)  Alonzo  died  at  the  age  of  fourteen  years. 
(6)  Lot  F.,  employed  as  an  engineer  at  the  mines  at  St.  Qair,  married 
Sarah  Pearson.  They  have  no  children.  (7)  Sarah  is  the  wife  of  David 
Phillips,  who  is  employed  kt  outside  wor^  at  the  Scranton  (Pa.)  mines,  and 
they  have  eight  children,  Roy,  Jennie,  Oaud,  Harry,  Albert,  Elizabeth,  Thelma 
and  Dolly.  (8)  Eliza  R.  is  the  widow  of  John  Gregory.  (9)  Dolly  died  at 
the  age  of  twenty-three  years.  (10)  Sanford,  deceased,  married  Saphronia 
Roth,  who  resides  at  Shenandoah.  They  had  children:  Elizabeth,  who  mar- 
ried Will  Davis,  of  Stamford,  Conn. ;  Myrtle,  immarried ;  Ethel,  and  Florence, 
the  three  last  named  living  with  their  aunt  Mrs.  Gregory.  All  the  members 
of  this  family  attend  the  Methodist  Episcopal  Church  at  Shenandoah. 

HENRY  SACHS,  of  Nuremberg,  Schuylkill  county,  is  one  of  the  best 
known  residents  of  North  Union  township,  his  duties  as  postmaster  and  mer- 
chant bringing  him  into  daily  contact  with  most  of  his  fellow  citizens.  He 
was  bora  July  18,  1871,  at  Eckley,  in  Luzerne  county,  Pa.,  and  is  of  German 
descent,  his  grandfather,  John  Sachs,  having  lived  and  died  in  Germany.  He 
was  a  blacksmith  at  Eba,  and  is  buried  there.  His  wife  came  to  America, 
and  is  buried  at  Nuremberg,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  They  were  the  parents  of 
the  following  children :  Daniel  Martin ;  Elizabeth,  widow  of  Henry  Hill,  liv- 
ing at  Hazleton,  Pa.;  Adam,  a  retired  miner  and  hotel-keeper  of  Freeland, 
Pa.,  who  married  Barbara  Wiegand;  Gertmde,  wife  of  John  Benner,  watch- 
man at  the  Hazleton  National  Bank;  and  Jacob,  a  miner,  of  Hazleton,  who 
married  Mary  Heimbach.  The  parerits  adhered  to  the  German  Reformed 
faith. 

Daniel  Martin  Sachs,  son  of  John,  was  bom  Oct.  26,  1842,  at  Eba,  Ger- 
many, and  grew  up  in  his  native  land,  receiving  ordinary  educational  advan- 
tages. When  sixteen  years  old  he  made  the  joumey  to  America  alone,  land- 
ing: at  New  York  and  proceeding  thence  to  Lofty,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  whence 

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802  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

he  walked  to  Eckley,  Luzerne  county.  There  he  found  work  in  the  coal 
mines,  first  for  Leiseriiig  &  Co.,  later  for  Wentz  &  Co.,  and  in  time  became 
foreman  for  the  company.  When  he  had  been  in  this  country  about  one  year 
he  sent  to  Germany  for  his  mother,  who  joined  him  at  Eckley.  He  removed 
from  that  place  Aug.  15,  1881,  to  Deringer,  Luzerne  county,  where  he  was 
mine  foreman  for  Coxe  Bros.  &  Co.,  and  later  was  promoted  to  general  mine 
foreman,  holding  that  position  until  his  death,  which  occurred  at  Deringer 
March  7,  1909.  He  and  his  wife,  Anna  Elizabeth  (Wiegand),  are  buried 
at  Nuremberg,  Pa.  He  was  a  member  of  the  German  Reformed  Church,  a 
Republican  in  political  sentiment,  and  at  one  time  belonged  to  the  Independent 
Order  of  Odd  Fellows.  He  was  elected  to  the  office  of  school  director,  and 
was  one  of  the  highly  respected  members  of  the  community  in  which  he  resided. 
To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Daniel  M.  Sachs  were  bom  the  following  children:  Eliz- 
abeth resides  at  Nuremberg,  Pa. ;  William,  of  Hazleton,  Pa.,  a  surveyor,  mar- 
ried Mary  Spiece ;  Henry  is  next  in  the  family ;  Anna  Catherine  is  the  wife  of 
iohn  Rabuck,  draughtsman  for  the  L.  &  N.  Railroad  Company,  at  Louisville, 
wy.;  Daniel  Martin,  of  Oil  City,  Pa.,  vice  president  of  the  Northern  Pipe 
Line  Company,  married  Olive  Lobach ;  Anna  Donatas  is  a  public  school  teacher 
at  Weston,  Pa.,  and  lives  at  Nuremberg. 

Mrs.  Anna  Elizabeth  (Wiegand)  Sachs  was  bom  in  1848  in  Germany, 
and  came  to  America  with  her  parents  when  two  years  old,  the  family  set- 
tling at  Stockton,  Luzerne  Co.,  Pa.  Her  father,  Christopher  Wiegand,  was  a 
bladcsmith,  and  after  following  his  trade  for  a  time  turned  to  hotelkeeping, 
conducting  the  "Wiegand  Hotel"  at  Freeland,  Pa.,  up  to  the  time  of  his 
death.  He  and  his  wife  are  both  buried  at  Freeland.  He  belonged  to  the 
Reformed  Church  at  that  place,  and  in  politics  was  associated  with  the 
Republican  party.  His  children  were:  Gertrude,  widow  of  William  Sipple, 
living  in  Philadelphia;  Anna  Elizabeth,  Mrs.  Sachs;  and  Barbara,  who  is 
married  to  Adam  Sachs,  of  Freeland. 

Henry  Sachs  attended  public  school  at  Eckley  and  Gowen,  Pa.,  and  the 
Orangeville  Academy  in  Columbia  county,  this  State.  When  but  eleven  years 
old  he  commenced  work  at  the  Deringer  breaker,  picking  slate,  and  was 
employed  there  for  three  months.  Later  he  was  in  the  office  of  the  mine 
boss,  as  errand  boy,  in  time  was  promoted  to  clerk,  and  held  that  position 
until  he  reached  the  age  of  twenty  years.  Then,  being  ambitious  to  better 
his  condition,  he  took  a  commercial  course  at  the  Wyoming  Seminary,  in 
Luzerne  county,  and  upon  its  completion  returned  to  Deringer  and  took  the 
position  of  warehouse  man  at  Fern  Glen  for  the  Pennsylvania  Railroad 
Company.  While  so  engaged  he  leamed  telegraphy,  and  he  remained  there 
for  a  year,  until  June  2,  1^3.  On  June  2,  1^4,  he  was  appointed  telegraph 
operator  at  Gum  Run  tower,  for  the  same  company,  being  stationed  there 
two  years ;  was  next  employed  at  the  Deringer  colliery  of  Coxe  Bros.  &  Co., 
for  a  few  years,  shipping  coal;  and  was  transferred  thence  to  the  company 
'store  at  Fern  Glen,  as  bookkeeper,  holding  that  position  a  few  years.  Resum- 
ing telegraphy,  he  became  operator  for  the  Lehigh  Valley  Railroad  Company 
at  Park  Place  until  October,  1898,  when  he  entered  the  employ  of  Lentz  & 
Co.,  in  their  company  store  at  Park  Place,  being  retained  there  until  Jan. 
I,  1905.  Mr.  Sachs  had  to  give  up  his  work  there  on  account  of  illness,  and 
when  he  went  back  to  work  it  was  as  station  agent  at  Sheppton,  Schuylkill 
county,  for  the  D.  S.  &  S.  Railroad  Company,  now  the  Lehigh  Valley  Railroad 
Company.     He  continued  to  discharge  his  duties  as  such  until  May,   1907, 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  803 

when  he  became  extra  telegrapher  for  the  Pennsylvania  Railroad  Company, 
and  was  so  engaged  until  191 1.  On  July  17th  of  that  year  he  bought  the 
store  of  M.  Griffith  at  Nuremberg,  and  has  since  conducted  that  establish- 
ment very  successfully,  dealing  in  shoes  and  clothing.  The  stxjre  has  gained 
steadily  in  popularity  under  his  management,  and  he  has  made  a  place  for 
himself  among  the  reliable  merchants  of  the  town,  where  he  is  held  in  high 
regard  for  his  sterling  personal  qualities,  shown  in  all  the  relations  of  life. 
On  Nov.  16,  191 1,  Mr.  Sachs  received  the  appointment  of  postmaster  at  Nurem- 
berg, and  has  filled  the  office  since  to  the  thorough  satisfaction  of  his  fellow 
citizens.  His  ability  as  an  accountant  is  well  known,  and  since  May,  1906, 
he  has  been  private  auditor  for  the  Central  Pennsylvania  Quarry  Stripping  & 
Construction  Company  and  for  the  Benjamin  Iron  &  Steel  Company,  both  of 
Hazleton.  He  is  secretary  and  treasurer,  as  well  as  a  director,  of  the  Conyng- 
ham  Valley  Telephone  Company ;  is  a  past  president  and  trustee  of  Washington 
Camp  No.  96,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  of  Nuremberg ;  has  been  director  of  the  Nurem- 
berg Comet  Band  since  191 1,  and  plays  the  comet  with  that  organization; 
is  sdfiliated  with  Camp  No.  226,  Woodmen  of  the  World,  at  Rock  Glen,  Pa. ; 
and  is  a  leading  member  of  Emanuel  Reformed  Church  at  Nuremberg,  which 
he  is  now  serving  as  deacon,  tmstee  and  secretary  of  the  Sunday  school.  On 
political  questions  Mr.  Sachs  is  a  Republican.  He  has  serVed  as  school  director 
of  North  Union  township. 

On  Feb.  22,  1896,  Mr.  Sachs  was  united  in  marriage  with  Edna  Estella 
Breisch,  who  was  bom  July  6,  1879,  at  Nuremberg,  where  she  began  her 
education  in  the  public  schools.  Later  she  attended  the  public  schools  of 
Bloomsburg,  Pa.  She  is  a  member  of  Emanuel  Lutheran  Church  at  Nurem- 
bergi  and  a  Sunday  school  teacher  there  at  present.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Sachs  have 
had  a  family  of  four  children:  Larue  A.,  born  July  i,  1897,  ^^^  educated 
at  Nuremberg,  graduating  from  the  high  school  in  191 5,  and  is  a  helpful 
worker  in  the  Lutheran  Church,  singing  in  the  choir  and  teaching  in  the  Sun- 
day school;  Edgar  Theodore,  bom  Jan.  22,  1899,  died  March  16,  1899;  Daniel 
Ray,  bom  May  3,  1902,  at  Park  Place,  is  attending  school  at  Nuremberg; 
Walter  Henry,  bom  Aug.  13,  1908,  is  attending  school  at  Nuremberg. 

George  Breisch,  great-great-grandfather  of  Mrs.  Sachs,  moved  from  Bucks 
county.  Pa.,  to  Columbia  county,  and  was  one  of  the  pioneer  settlers  in  that 
region. 

John  Breisch,  great-grandfather  of  Mrs.  Sachs,  died  Oct.  29,  1873,  aged 
seventy-seven  years,  one  month,  twelve  days.  He  was  a  pioneer  in  the  Cata- 
wissa  valley,  in  Schuylkill  county,  farming  in  Union  township,  his  property 
there  belonging  at  present  to  the  heirs  of  Henry  Breisch.  His  wife,  Elizabeth 
(Shuman),  died  Aug.  22,  1869,  aged  sixty-nine  years,  two  months,  twenty- 
nine  days,  and  they  are  buried  at  the  old  White  Church  in  Union  township. 
Mr.  Breisch  held  to  the  principles  of  the  Republican  party.  His  children  were : 
Washington,  who  died  when  about  twenty  years  old;  Rudolph;  Jacob,  who 
married  Fayette  Zimmerman ;  Adam,  who  married  Mary  Rarig ;  Henry,  who 
married  Rebecca  Reich;  Josiah,  who  married  Susanna  Zimmerman;  and 
Susanna,  wife  of  John  Maurer. 

Rudolph  Breisch,  son  of  John,  was  born  Jan.  5,  1826,  was  reared  in  Schuyl- 
kill county,  and  died  Sept.  10,  1906.  He  and  his  wife  are  buried  in  the  ceme- 
tery of  the  Old  White  Church,  and  he  was  one  of  the  very  active  members  of 
the  Evangelical  Lutheran  congregation  there,  serving  as  elder,  deacon,  and  in 
other  important  positions.     In  early  life  he  was  a  Republican,  but  later  he 


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804  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

voted  independently.  He  served  as  a  school  director  while  living  in  Black 
Creek  township,  Luzerne  county.  For  a  time  Mr.  Breisch  kept  hotel  at  Mid- 
dleport,  Schuylkill  county,  later  farmed  in  Black  Creek  township,  and  was 
subsequently  engaged  in  merchandising  at  Brandonville,  Schuylkill  county, 
also  lumbering  near  that  place.  On  Jan.  26,  1847,  he  married  Missouri  Ann  Zim- 
merman, who  was  bom  July  5,  1827,  daughter  of  Roland  and  Elizabeth  (Focht) 
Zimmerman,  of  Catawissa  Valley,  and  died  Feb.  19,  191 3.  They  had  the  fol- 
lowing family:  Barbara  E.  married  Benjamin  Seltzer,  and  both  are  deceased; 
Theodore  A.  is  mentioned  below ;  John  B.,  who  lives  at  Mahanoy  City,  mar- 
ried Mary  Boyer  (deceased)  and  (second)  Sallie  Fisher;  Montgomery  R. 
died  aged  four  years,  nine  months;  Jeffrey  A.  married  Hattie  Miller  and 
lives  at  Orwigsburg,  Pa. ;  Minerva  C.  is  the  wife  of  Frank  Davenport,  of  St. 
Clair,  Pa. ;  Jacob  W.,  deceased,  married  Carrie  M.  Stauffer,  who  lives  at 
Nuremberg;  Oliver  A.  is  deceased;  Oscar  C.  married  Elma  Fish,  and  they 
live  at  Kansas  City,  Kans.;  Cyrus  E.  married  Mayme  Hagenbuch,  and  their 
home  is  at  Mahanoy  City. 

Theodore  A.  Breisch  wad  bom  Aug.  31,  1850,  at  Middleport,  Schuylkill 
county,  was  reared  in  this  county,  and  received  his  education  in  the  public 
schools  of.  Union  township  and  at  Wyoming  Seminary,  in  Luzerne  county. 
He  began  life  as  a  clerk  in  the  general  store  of  Jacob  Breisch  at  Zion  Grove, 
in  North  Union  township,  where  he  remained  for  three  years.  In  1871,  in 
partnership  with  J.  M.  Stout,  he  embarked  in  the  general  mercantile  busi- 
ness at  Nuremberg,  and  four  years  later  bought  out  his  partner,  after  that 
conducting  tiie  store  alone  until  1881.  Then  he  became  associated  with 
his  brother,  Jacob  William  Breisch,  and  they  did  business  together  until  the 
latter's  death,  April  26,  191 5.  Mr.  Breisch  is  now  carrying  on  the  store  on 
his  own  account.  He  also  owns  and  operates  a  private  water  supply,  having  a 
large  storage  tank  on  his  property,  from  which  he  supplies  water  to  the 
inhabitants  of  the  town.  There  is  a  water  tower  tp  produce  pressure,  and 
a  full  pumping  outfit,  and  the  service  is  very  satisfactory,  thirty-eight  fam- 
ilies patronizing  this  plant.  It  is  typical  of  Mr.  Breisch's  progressive  dis- 
position. He  has  served  North  Union  township  as  school  director  and  tax 
collector,  was  auditor  of  Black  Qreek  township,,  Luzerne  county,  and  has 
twice  been  elected  justice  of  the  peace,  but  has  never  qualified.  He  is  a 
Republican  and  a  Lutheran,  belonging  to  Emanuel  Church  at  Nuremberg,  of 
which  he  has  been  treasurer  for  several  years. 

On  Sept.  I,  1872,  Mr.  Breisch  married  Mary  C.  Stauffer,  who  was  bom 
April  27,  1854,  daughter  of  David  and  Maria  Anne  (Andreas)  Stauffer,  and 
an  account  of  her  parents  and  earlier  ancestors  appears  elsewhere  in  this 
work.  Mrs.  Breisch  is  a  native  of  Ringtown,  where  she  was  reared  and 
educated.  During  her  girlhood,  until  her  marriage,  she  sang  in  the  choir  of 
the  Old  White  Church  near  that  borough.  She  is  now  a  member  of  Emanuel 
Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  at  Nuremberg  and  has  been  a  teacher  in  the 
Sunday  school  for  many  years,  having  beert  superintendent  of  the  primary 
department  and  now  teaching  a  young  people's  Bible  class.  Mrs.  Breisch  has 
also  been  active  in  the  choir,  having  led  the  singing  in  church  for  a  number 
of  years.  Five  children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Breisch:  Erdie 
B.,  bom  June  10,  1873,  is  now  the  wife  of  Josiah  Singley,  who  is  engaged 
as  a  traveling  salesman  and  resides  at  Wilkinsburg,  Pa.;  their  children  are 
Mary  L.  and  Walter  H.  Gertmde  M.,  bom  June  5,  1875,  died  Dec.  6,  1877. 
Lottie  L.,  bom  Aug.  4,  1877,  died  March  24,  1881.    Edna  E.  is  the  wife  of 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  805 

Henry  Sachs.  Willard  E.,  born  Nov.  13,  1881,  assists  his  father  in  the  store; 
he  married  Mayme  King,  and  they  have  a  family  of  four  children,  Harold  A., 
Theodore  W.,  Elva  M.  and  Viola  May. 

OLIVER  MILLER,  of  McAdoo,  Schuylkill  county,  has  been  a  resident 
of  that  borough  from  young  manhood,  and  after  a  varied  experience  is  now 
doing  business  there  on  his  own  account,  having  recently  bought  the  interest 
of  W.  F.  Miller  in  the  only  ice  plant  in  the  vicinity.  He  had  been  in  Mr. 
Miller's  employ  for  several  years  before  he  acquired  the  ownership  of  the 
business,  which  he  is  well  qualified  to  continue  successfully. 

Daniel  Miller,  father  of  Oliver  Miller,  was  bom  in  West  Penn  township, 
Schuylkill  county,  and  followed  farming  there  until  his  death.  His  wife, 
whose  maiden  name  was  Susanna  Runkel,  is  also  deceased,  and  they  are 
buried  at  the  White  Church  in  West  Penn  township.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Daniel 
Miller  had  two  children,  Oliver  and  Alice,  the  latter  now  married  to  Pierce 
Bear  and  living  in  Berks  county,  Pennsylvania. 

Oliver  Miller  was  bom  July  22,  1868,  in  West  Penn  township,  this  county, 
where  he  grew  to  manhood,  obtaining  his  education  in  the  public  schools  of 
the  home  locality.  He  was  reared  to  farming,  and  after  leaving  home  was 
engaged  at  such  work  in  Rush  township  for  about  four  years,  at  the  end  of 
that  time  settling  at  McAdoo.  During  the  first  four  years  of  his  residence 
in  the  town  he  drove  team  for  Mr.  Spangler,  and  was  afterwards  employed 
in  different  positions  about  the  collieries.  Then  for  six  months  he  operated 
the  electric  light  plant  at  McAdoo,  and  for  the  next  seven  years  was  in  the 
employ  of  W.  F.  Miller,  who  conducted  the  ice  business  which  Oliver  Miller 
bought  from  him  in  the  spring  of  1915.  In  the  winter  season  Mr.  Miller 
does  considerable  hauling,  and  with  both  branches  of  his  business  is  kept 
constantly  busy.  He  is  a  man  of  recognized  ability  and  trustworthiness,  and 
has  exercised  a  good  influence  in  the  public  affairs  of  the  borough,  in  which 
he  has  taken  an  active  part  for  some  time.  In  191 3  he  was  elected  by  a 
large  majority  as  a  member  of  thle  local  school  board,  and  is  treasurer  of 
that  body.  His  political  support  has  been  given  to  the  Republican  party. 
Socially  he  affiliates  with  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.  and  the  Order  of  Independent 
Americans. 

Mr.  Miller  married  Dora  Frank,  and  two  of  the  children  born  to  this 
marriage  died  young,  the  survivors  being:  Edna,  Harry,  Mabel,  Florence 
and  Helen.    The  family  are  Lutherans  in  religious  faith. 

GEORGE  B.  McCLELLAN  HORN,  late  of  East  Bmnswick  township, 
was  a  prosperous  farmer  and  substantial  citizen  of  that  township  until  his 
death,  which  occurred  when  he  was  in  his  prime.  His  widow,  who  now 
resides  at  McKeansburg,  is  a  member  of  the  Albright  and  Fegley  families, 
both  highly  respected  in  this  section,  where  they  have  long  been  associated 
with  good  citizenship  and  progress. 

Mr.  Horn  was  bom  in  Lehigh  county.  Pa.,  Oct.  8,  1862,  son  of  Jonathan 
Horn  and  grandson  of  Christian  Horn.  The  father  was  also  a  native  of 
Lehigh  county,  born  Jan.  7,  1827,  in  Heidelberg  township.  At  the  age  of 
twelve  years  he  was  apprenticed  to  learn  the  blacksmith's  trade,  at  which  he 
continued  to  work  until  forty  years  old,  and  he  was  considered  one  of  the 
best  blacksmiths  in  Lehigh  county.  In  1866  he  purchased  a  firfe  farm  in 
East   Brunswick   township,   Schuylkill   county,    from   William  Albright,   for 


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806  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

$9,000.  He  was  a  good  manager,  and  soon  bought  another  farm,  from  Wil- 
liam Bolich,  for  $10,000,  which  later  became  the  property  of  his  son  George 
and  is  now  owned  by  the  latter's  widow,  Mrs.  Hattie  Horn.  The  first  farm 
is  now  owned  by  George  K.  Zimmerman.  Mr.  Horn  also  bought  a  farm 
from  Reuben  Jones,  for  $2,700,  which  property  is  now  owned  by  his  son 
Jonathan  P.  Jonathan  Horn  married  Sophia  Louisa  Bock,  who  was  bom 
Aug.  20,  1833,  in  Albany  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  daughter  of  George  and 
Rebecca  (Henninger)  Bock,  also  natives  of  .Albany  township.  Children  as 
follows  were  bom  to  this  marriage:  Hannah  Louise,  bom  April  3,  1850, 
died  June  3,  1850;  Lucetta  Rebecca,  bom  June  9,  1851,  married  Dr.  P.  C. 
Detwiler,  a  dentist,  of  Schuylkill  Haven,  Pa.;  Josiah  Franklin,  bom  June  4, 
1853,  married  Agnes  Koch;  Thomas  Henry,  bom  March  20,  1855,  died  July 
7,  1861,  aged  six  years,  three  months,  seventeen  days;  Elmira  Missouri,  bom 
June  16,  1857,  ^s  the  widow  of  Thomas  Bensinger,  and  lives  in  McKeans- 
burg,  Pa.;  Jonathan  Peter,  born  Aug.  26,  1859,  married  Rebecca  Rarick; 
George  B.  McClellan,  bom  Oct.  8,  1862,  married  Hattie  Albright;  Priscilla 
June,  bom  Sept.  7,  1864,  died  July  12,  1896;  Sophia  Louisa,  bom  March 
27,  1867,  died  April  9,  1886;  Sarah  Maria,  bom  April  10,  1869,  died  Jan.  21, 
1890;  Howard  Walter  married  Alvina  Gottshall;  Agnes  Victoria  married 
Oliver  Minim.  Before  the  death  of  Jonathan  Horn  his  sons  George  and 
Jonathan  P.  bought  the  two  farms  remaining.  He  died  Aug.  27,  1905,  his 
wife  on  July  15,  1910.    They  are  buried  at  McKeansburg. 

George  B.  McClellan  Horn  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  East  Brunswick 
township,  where  he  grew  to  manhood,  meantime  assisting  his  father  on  the 
home  farm.  Before  the  death  of  his  father  he  bought  the  property  of  100 
acres,  all  cleared,  which  originally  had  been  the  William  Bolich  farm,  and 
carried  on  general  farming  until  his  death,  which  occurred  Feb.  23,  1906. 
He  was  a  progressive  worker,  an  interested  member  of  McKeansburg  Grange, 
No.  1256,  Patrons  of  Husbandry,  and  also  belonged  to  Washington  Camp  No. 
100,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  of  New  Ringgold.  His  political  allegiance  was  given  to 
the  Democratic  party.  He  held  the  esteem  of  all  his  fellow  citizens,  and  was 
a  valued  member  of  the  Christ  Lutheran  Church  at  McKeansburg,  where  he 
is  buried. 

Mr.  Hom  married  Hattie  Albright,  a  daughter  of  Charles  and  Rebecca 
(Fegley)  Albright,  and  they  had  two  children:  Clarence  Albright,  bom 
June  16,  1 89 1,  attended  school  in  East  Brunswick  township,  graduated  from 
Schuylkill  Seminary,  Reading,  Pa.,  in  the  class  of  1912,  and  is  now  a  student 
in  the  Pennsylvania  State  College ;  he  taught  school  one  year  in  Lilesville,  N. 
C.  Harry  Franklin,  bom  Aug.  31,  1894,  began  his  education  in  the  East 
Brunswick  township  schools,  and  was  a  member  of  the  class  of  1915  at  Schuyl- 
kill Seminary,  Reading,  Pa.,  taking  a  preparatory  course. 

Mrs.  Hattie  (Albright)  Horn  was  bom  June  23,  1870,  in  West  Brunswick 
township,  and  received  her  education  in  the  schools  of  East  Brunswick  town- 
ship. After  the  death  of  her  husband  she  continued  to  reside  on  the  farm, 
managing  it  for  seven  years.  When  her  children  went  away  to  school  she 
rented  the  place  to  Frank  Kriner,  and  moved  to  McKeansburg,  where  she 
had  bought  a  fine  residence  from  Simon  Mengle,  and  is  still  residing  there. 
She  is  an  active  member  of  the  Church  of  God  (Steigerwalts).   , 

Peter  Albright,  Mrs.  Horn's  grandfather,  was  a  farmer  in  West  Bruns- 
wick township,  owning  a  tract  which  he  operated  for  a  number  of  years, 
wfien  he  rented  it  out.     Then  he  went  into  the  general  store  business  at 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  807 

DrehersviUe,  this  county,  which  he  conducted  until  he  sold  out  and  returned 
to  his  farm,  where  he  died  when  over  ninety  years  of  age.  His  wife,  Polly 
(Fussebnan),  lived  to  be  over  seventy.  They  had  six  children:  Isabelle 
marned  John  Kimmel,  who  is  deceased;  Catherine  married  Nathan  Saltzer, 
and  both  are  deceased ;  Elizabeth  married  Henry  Hoy,  and  both  are  deceased ; 
James,  deceased,  married  Caroline  Heisler;  Charles  is  the  father  of  Mrs.  Horn; 
Francisca  is  deceased.  The  parents  are  buried  in  the  Reformed  cemetery  at 
Orwigsburg.  Mr.  Albright  was  a  Democrat,  and  a  member  of  the  Reformed 
Church  at  Orwigsburg. 

Charles  Albright,  Mrs.  Horn's  father,  was  a  farmer  throughout  his  active 
years,  always  working  for  his  father  until  the  latter's  death.  He  married 
Rebecca  Fegley,  who  was  bom  Jan.  29,  1847,  Jn  Pinedale,  West  Brunswick 
township,  daughter  of  Nathan  and  Phoebe  (Knittle)  Fegley,  and  their  chil- 
dren are:  James  married  Phoebe  Kimmel;  Lizzie  married  Albert  G.  Koch; 
Agnes  married  Howard  G.  Kimmel,  who  is  deceased ;  Hattie  is  the  widow  of 
George  B.  McClellan  Horn.  Mr.  Albright  is  now  living  retired  with  his 
daughter,  Mrs.  Albert  Koch,  in  East  Brunswick  township.  Like  his  father 
he  is  a  stanch  Democrat,  and  he  united  with  the  Reformed  Church  at  Orwigs- 
burg. 

Abraham  Fegley,  Mrs.  Horn's  great-grandfather  in  the  maternal  line, 
was  born  in  Berks  county,  Pa.,  and  was  a  farmer  by  occupation  all  his  life. 
He  was  the  owner  of  a  large  tract.  He  married  twice,  and  had  the  follow- 
ing children  by  his  first  wife:  Nathan;  Charles,  who  married  Lavina  Hoff- 
man; and  Elizabeth,  Mrs.  William  Dreher.  Five  childcen  were  bom  to  his 
second  marriage:  Catherine,  Sallie,  Amanda  (Mrs.  Andrew  Haupt),  Reuben 
(who  married  Maria  Boyer)  and  Daniel.  Mr.  Fegley  and  both  his  wives  are 
buried  at  Orwigsburg.  He  was  a  member  of  the  Reformed  Church  there, 
and  a  Democrat  on  political  questions. 

Nathan  Fegley,  son  of  Abraham,  was  bom  in  Longswamp  township, 
Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  settled  in  West  Bmnswick  township,  Schuylkill  county,  and 
was  a  farmer  for  John  Matz  at  Pinedale.  Later  he  bought  a  farm  of  sixty- 
five  acres  in  West  Brunswick  which  he  operated  until  his  death.  By  his 
marriage  to  Phoebe  Knittle,  daughter  of  Daniel  and  Rebecca  (Paul)  Knittle, 
he  had  children  as  follows:  Daniel  married  Mary  Zimmerman;  Sarah  is  the 
widow  of  Benjamin  Zimmerman;  Rebecca  is  the  mother  of  Mrs.  Horn; 
Joanna  married  Jack  Kramer;  William  married  Sarah  Bachman;  Kate  mar- 
ried George  Moyer;  Susanna  married  Charles^  Kramer.  Nathan  Fegley  was 
a  prominent  member  of  the  Church  of  God  at  Steigerwalt,  active  in  *all  its 
affairs,  and  zealous  in  the  promotion  of  religious  interests  generally.  He  held 
to  the  principles  of  the  Democratic  party. 

SALEM  BENJAMIN  SCHAFFER,  of  East  Bmnswick  township,  is  a 
son  of  Benjamin  Schaflfer  and  grandson  of  the  late  Jacob  SchaflFer,  both  of 
whom  lived  and  worked  in  that  township.  All  of  the  name  have  been  respected 
citizens  and  held  a  worthy  place  in  the  community,  aiding  in  the  development 
of  her  agricultural  resources  specially  and  doing  their  share  in  furthering 
local  progress. 

Jacob  Schaifer,  the  grandfather,  was  a  farmer  and  stonemason  in  East 
Brunswick  township.  He  leamed  his  trade  early  in  life,  and  later  he  bought 
a  farm  of  forty-five  acres,  part  of  which  he  cleared.  He  operated  his  farm 
in  connection  with  work  at  his  trade,  and  when  his  children  became  old 


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808  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

enough  they  took  care  of  the  land  while  he  gave  all  his  time  to  his  trade. 
He  died  on  the  farm.  His  wife,  Priscilla  (Sassaman),  died  in  October,  1912, 
aged  ninety-one  years.  Children  as  follows  were  bom  to  them:  Jacob,  de- 
ceased, married  Emma  Yoxhammer,  who  now  lives  in  Chicago,  111.;  Henry, 
deceased,  married  Sarah  Bachert,  who  resides  in  East  Brunswick  township; 
Benjamin  is  next  in  the  order  of  birth;  Priscilla  married  Jacob  Marbach, 
and  they  reside  at  Middleport,  Pa.;  Amanda  married  Harry  McMuUin,  and 
they  reside  at  Reading,  Pa.;  Mary  married  Solomon  Bachert.  and  they  are 
residents  of  East  Brunswick  township;  Lizzie  married  a  Mr.  Reed,  and  both 
are  deceased ;  Emma  married  Frank  Halderman,  and  resides  at  New  Haven, 
Conn.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Schaffer  are  buried  at  the  Frieden's  Church,  New  Ring- 
gold. He  was  a  leading  member  of  the  Lutheran  congregation  of  that  church, 
which  he  served  as  elder,  deacon,  and  in  other  capacities.  His  political  sym- 
pathies were  with  the  Democratic  party,  and  he  held  the  office  of  supervisor. 

Benjamin  Schaffer,  son  of  Jacob,  was  born  in  East  Brunswick  township, 
June  3,  1 85 1,  was  reared  and  educated  in  that  township,  and  assisted  his 
father  on  the  farm  until  twenty-one  years  of  age.  Then  he  married  and 
bought  a  f^w  acres  in  East  Bnmswick  township,  on  which  he  settled.  He 
learned  the  trades  of  plasterer  and  stonemason,  which  he  followed  for  a  few 
years,  when  he  sold  his  Httle  place  and  bought  a  tract  of  fifty  acres  in  West 
Penn  township,  this  county,  and  cultivated  it  in  addition  to  working  at  his 
trades.  Later  he  sold  this  tract  and  came  to  East  Brunswick  township,  first 
purchasing  a  tract  of  fifty  acres  and  later  a  tract  of  153  acres,  for  his  son 
Salem.  Up  to  I9i4«he  had  about  eighty  acres.  He  then  bought  a  house  and 
small  lot  and  is  now  living  retired,  his  son  Norman  Edward  having  one  of 
his  farms,  and  his  son  Salem  another  tract,  now  having  108  acres.  Benjamin 
Schaffer  has  always  followed  plastering  and  stone-masonry  as  well  as  agricul- 
tural work.  His  wife,  Savina  (Halderman),  now  about  sixty-seven  years 
old,  is  a  daughter  of  Abraham  and  Priscilla  (Zimmerman)  Halderman,  and 
children  as  follows  have  been  bom  to  them:  Amanda,  who  died  in  infancy; 
Harvey  Franklin,  who  died  young;  Salem  Benjamin;  Qaude,  who  died  young; 
Elizabeth,  wife  of  Howard  W.  Hessinger;  Samuel,  who  married  Maude  De- 
Long;  Maude,  Uving  at  home;  and  Norman  Edward,  who  married  Annie 
Heiser.  Mr.  Schaffer  is  a  Democrat,  has  been  elected  school  director,  and  is 
a  devout  member  of  the  United  Evangelical  Church  at  New  Ringgold.  At 
one  time  he  was  a  teacher  in  the  Sunday  school. 

Salem  B.  Schaffer  was  bom  Nov.  i,  1877,  in  East  Bmnswick  township, 
where  he  spent  his  early  years  attending  the  public  schools.  He  worked  for 
his  father  until  twenty-one  years  old,  when  he  was  married  and  moved  to 
his  present  place,  which  he  operated Jor  his  father  for  seven  years,  until  he 
bought  it.  He  has  occupied  this  farm  since  March  29,  1900,  and  has  almost 
sixty-five  acres  under  cultivation,  the  balance  in  timber.  During  the  summer 
months  Mr.  Schaffer  "hucksters"  to  Middleport  and  New  Philadelphia  twice 
a  week.  His  industrious  character  and  sterling  personal  qualities  hold  the 
esteem  of  all  who  have  dealings  with  him.  He  is  a  member  in  good  standing 
of  the  Reformed  congregation  at  the  Frieden's  Church,  New  Ringgold,  and 
socially  is  united  with  Protection  Council,  No.  935,  Order  of  Independent 
Americans,  at  McKeansburg.    Politically  he  is  a  Democrat. 

Mr.  SchaflFer  is  married  to  Katie  Rebecca  Houser,  who  was  bom  May  22, 
1876,  at  Tamaqua,  this  county,  received  a  public  school  education  in  West 
Penn  township,  and  at  Nesquehoning,  Carbon  county,  and  remained  at  home 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  809 

until  her  marriage.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Schaffer  have  had  four  children,  bom  as 
follows :  William  Edward,  May  23,  1900 ;  Ethel  May,  July  6,  1902 ;  Ida  Eliz- 
abeth, Oct.  14,  1907;  Harriet  Arline,  Dec.  28,  1910  (died  Feb.  5,  1911).  The 
latter  is  buried  at  Frieden's  Church.  The  surviving  children  attend  school  in 
the  township. 

Abraham  Houser,  Mrs.  Schaffer's  grandfather,  was  a  farmer  in  East  Bruns- 
wick township,  where  he  died.  He  and  his  wife  are  buried  at  Zion's  Church 
in  West  Penn  township.  They  had  the  following  children,  all  now  deceased : 
Mrs.  William  Bachert ;  Frank  and  Abraham,  both  of  whom  died  in  the  West ; 
Sarah,  who  married  John  L.  Eckert  (he  is  deceased)  ;  Diana,  who  married  a 
Johnson  (he  is  deceased);  Jonathan,  the  father  of  Mrs.  Schaffer;  Eli,  who 
married  Rebecca  Houser,  who  is  deceased ;  and  Nathan. 

Jonathan  Houser  was  bom  in  Kleckner's  valley,  in  East  Brunswick  town- 
ship, Nov.  18,  1845,  and  died  Jan.  18,  1912.  He  was  educated  in  his  native 
township,  worked  at  home  on  the  farm  until  his  marriage,  and  also  handled 
timber.  Later  he  was  employed  by  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway  Com- 
pany, on  the  run  from  Tamaqua  to  Port  Richmond,  Philadelphia,  and  during 
his  fourteen  years*  service  on  the  railroad  resided  in  Tamaqua.  After  leav- 
ing the  railroad  he  rented  a  farm  for  two  years,  then  removing  to  Nesquehon- 
ing,  Carbon  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  drove  teams  for  John  T.  Miller,  lumber  dealer. 
He  continued  at  this  occupation  until  within  a  year  of  his  d^th,  being  obliged 
to  retire  because  of  illness.  He  is  buried  at  Nesquehoning.  Mrs.  Houser  is 
now  living  with  her  children.  Her  maiden  name  was  Mary  DeFrehn,  and  she 
was  bom  Dec.  3,  1848,  a  daughter  of  Henry  and  Rebecca  (Miller)  DeFrehn, 
natives  of  Berks  county,  Pa.  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Houser  had  children  as  follows : 
Rosie  Alice  married  William  Hile,  and  resides  at  Nesquehoning,  Pa.;  John 
Francis,  also  of  Nesquehoning,  married  Mary  Gettes,  who  is  deceased;  Jere 
Henry  was  killed  on  the  railroad  when  twenty-six  years  old;  Katie  Rebecca 
is  the  wife  of  Salem  B.  Schaffer;  Mary  EUzabeth  married  John  Lubert,  and 
after  his  death  (second)  Edward  J.  Peters,  and  they  reside  at  Allentown, 
Pa.;  Annie  Amanda  married  Adam  Bechtel,  and  lives  at  Nesquehoning; 
Samuel  Eli  married  Hattie  Davis,  and  lives  at  Nesquehoning;  Dora  Jane 
married  Charles  Staudt,  of  Nesquehoning;  Oliver  FrankHn  died  in  infancy; 
William  Harrison  is  a  resident  of  Nesquehoning ;  Stella  May  is  now  in  Allen- 
town,  Pa. ;  Amelia  Irene  died  when  fourteen  months  old.  Mr.  Houser  attended 
Zion's  Church  in  West  Penn  township.  He  was  a  Republican  in  his  political 
views. 

HENRY  DANNER,  of  Rush  township,  is  one  of  the  remarkably  success- 
ful agriculturists  of  his  section  of  Schuylkill  county.  Few  men  in  that  region 
have  worked  as  hard  for  advancement,  and  few  have  had  as  satisfactory 
results.  His  fine  property,  as  he  has  developed  it,  is  considered  an  asset  to 
the  locality,  for  it  is  a  practical  demonstration  of  the  possibilities  of  the  neigh- 
borhood and  an  encouragement  to  others  who  have  interests  there.  He  makes 
a  specialty  of  truck  and  fruit  raising,  and  manufactures  and  deals  in  ice. 

Mr.  Danner  is  a  native  of  Bavaria,  Germany,  bom  Sept.  7,  1856,  son  of 
Henry  Jacob  Danner,  who  was  extensively  engaged  in  farming  and  was 
also  a  merchant.  The  father  made  two  trips  to  America,  but  never  took  up 
his  residence  in  this  country,  and  he  died  in  Germany  when  seventy-one  years 
old.     His  wife,  Caroline  (Grund),  died  in  Germany  at  the  age  of  fifty-six 


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810  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

years.  They  had  children  as  follows :  Frederick,  Jacob,  Peter,  Henry,  Eliz- 
abeth and  Caroline. 

Henry  Banner  spent  his  early  life  in  Germany,  assisting  his  father.  When 
ten  years  old  he  came  to  America  with  his  father,  and  for  six  weeks  was  at 
St.  Clair,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.  Returning  with  his  father  to  Germany,  he 
remained  there  until  sixteen  years  old,  when  he  again  came  to  this  country. 
For  a  time  he  was  at  Girardville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  employed  at  lime  burn- 
ing, living  at  that  place  about  fifteen  months.  He  then  went  West  to  Iowa,  and 
did  railroad  work  for  three  years,  and  returning  East  located  at  Cressona,  this 
county,  where  he  assisted  in  the  building  of  a  limekiln,  being  so  occupied  for 
six  months.  Again  he  was  in  Iowa  for  a  few  months,  removing  thence  to 
Nebraska,  where  he  bought  i6o  acres  of  railroad  land  in  Hamilton  county, 
upon  which,  however,  he  remained  only  a  short  time.  He  next  went  to 
Kansas,  where  he  was  employed  in  a  quarry  for  five  months,  after  which  he 
made  a  trip  to  New  York  City,  from  which  place  he  came  to  Tamaqua.  Here 
he  was  engaged  at  lime  burning  for  six  months,  and  then  married,  taking  his 
wife  out  to  his  farm  in  Nebraska,  where  they  lived  a  little  while.  Selling 
this  place  he  went  up  to  Minneapolis,  Minn.,  but  after  fifteen  months'  resi- 
dence there  went  back  to  Nebraska,  where  they  had  their  home  for  the  next 
twenty-one  months.  Coming  to  Tamaqua,  Pa.,  they  were  here  but  a  short 
time  when  they  returned  to  Minneapolis,  living  there  two  years,  since  when 
they  have  resided  in  Pennsylvania.  On  coming  from  Minneapolis  they  spent 
six  months  at  Tamaqua,  and  then  bought  a  tract" of  seventy  acres  in  Rush 
township,  Schuylkill  county,  part  of  which  is  included  in  Mr.  Banner's  pres- 
ent property  there.  He  sold  it  and  went  to  Shamokin,  Pa.,  for  a  time,  but 
having  decided  to  devote  himself  to  farming  bought  his  place  back,  and  he 
has  since  added  to  it  until  he  now  has  three  hundred  acres,  all  valuable  land. 
Of  this  large  tract  175  acres  are  under  excellent  cultivation.  It  has  all  been 
cleared  and  improved  by  hard  work,  and  Mr.  Banner  and  his  wife  have  lab- 
ored very  effectively  to  get  all  the  details  of  their  work  in  systematic  shape, 
by  which  means  they  are  able  to  accomplish  much  more  than  would  be  pos- 
sible under  average  conditions.  Besides  ordinary  crops  Mr.  Banner  raises 
large  quantities  of  truck  and  fruit,  having  over  fifteen  hundred  fruit  trees, 
apples,  peaches  and  pears.  He  has  made  his  way  by  diligent,  intelligent 
application  to  his  work,  and  deserves  to  be  called  a  self-made  man,  for  all 
his  progress  and  prosperity  is  due  to  his  own  exertions.  From  time  to  time 
he  has  turned  his  hand  to  other  work,  as  opportunity  has  offered.  For  sev- 
eral years  he  was  engaged  in  dairying,  having  thirty  cows,  but  he  gave  up 
this  branch  of  farming  in  1908.  He  is  also  interested  in  the  ice  business, 
having  built  three  dams  on  his  land  to  facilitate  the  production  of  ice,  which 
he  disposes  of  in  Tamaqua,  Lansford  and  Coaldale. 

On  May  4,  1881,  Mr.  Banner  married  Mary  Louisa  Schwalm,  a  native 
of  Tamaqua,  daughter  of  Jacob  and  Elizabeth  (May)  Schwalm.  Fourteen 
children  have  been  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Banner,  but  nine  died  young,  the 
survivors  being :  Rebecca  married  Henry  Hugle ;  Jacob  married  *  Annie 
Waters;  Frederick  married  Elizabeth  Aikens;  Ruth  married  Charles  Eberts; 
Edgar  married  Lucy  Erode. 

Mr.  Banner  is  an  Odd  Fellow  in  good  standing,  belonging  to  Lodge  No. 
86,  of  Tamaqua.  His  religious  connection  is  with  the  Evangelical  denomina- 
tion. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  811 

JOHN  J.  HEDE  (deceased)  was  established  in  the  general  merchandise 
business  at  Ashland  for  almost  a  quarter  of  a  century,  having  a  well-stocked 
store  on  Walnut  street.  Mr.  Hede  was  a  native  of  Schuylkill  county,  bom  near 
Ashland  in  July,  i860,  son  of  Michael  Hede  and  grandson  of  John  and  Mary 
(Kilcline)  Hede.  The  grandparents  came  to  America  in  1852,  following 
the  emigration  of  their  son  Michael,  and  settled  at  Ashland,  Schuylkill  Co., 
Pa.,  in  1856,  building  the  home  there  occupied  by  their  grandson,  the  late 
John  J.  Hede.  They  continued  to  reside  in  the  borough  the  remainder  of 
their  lives,  Mr.  Hede  dying  in  1871,  Mrs.  Hede  in  1870.  Both  reached  the 
advanced  age  of  eighty ;  they  are  buried  at  Ashland.  John  Hede  was  employed 
in  the  mines  in  the  vicinity  from  the  time  of  his  settlement  here.  His  family 
consisted  of  four  children,  Catherine,  Michael,  John  and  Winnie. 

Michael  Hede,  the  father  of  John  J.  Hede,  was  bom  in  County  Roscom- 
mon, Ireland,  where  he  was  reared  to  mining.  He  came  to  tliis  country  alone 
in  1842,  and  at  once  located  in  Ashland,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  later  moving  to 
the  vicinity  of  Pottsville.  In  1876  he  returned  to  Ashland,  where  he  passed 
the  remainder  of  his  days,  dying  in  March,  1892.  He  always  followed  mining 
after  coming  to  the  county.  At  Port  Carbon,  this  county,  Mr.  Hede  mar- 
ried Bridget  Kennedy,  who  was  born  in  County  Kilkenny,  Ireland,  daughter 
of  Michael  and  Mary  (Caton)  Kennedy,  who  came  to  the  United  States  with 
their  family  in  the  year  1850,  and  made  their  home  near  Pottsville,  contin- 
uing to  reside  there  the  rest  of  their  lives.  Mrs.  Kennedy  died  in  1870.  They 
had  a  family  of  four  children,  namely:  Olivia,  Fannie,  Bridget  and  Julia. 
Mr.  and  Mrs.  Michael  Hede  became  the  parents  of  eight  children,  viz.: 
Anna,  who  is  deceased ;  John  J. ;  Dennis,  deceased ;  Mary,  deceased ;  Michael, 
a  resident  of  Ashland^  Kate,  deceased;  William,  who  lives  at  Ashland,  mar- 
ried to  Jane  Ross  of  that  place;  and  Joseph,  deceased.  Of  the  daughters, 
Mary  married  Michael  Hennessy,  who  is  also  deceased,  and  to  them  were  bom 
three  children,  Anna,  Agatha  and  Catherine ;  of  these,  Anna  married  Thomas 
Flannagan,  of  Port  Carbon,  this  county.  The  other  two  made  their  home 
with  their  uncle,  John  J.  Hede,  assisting  him  in  the  conduct  of  the  general 
store. 

John  J.  Hede  was  educated  in  the  schools  of  Blythe  township,  this  county. 
When  only  nine  years  old  he  commenced  to  work  in  the  mines,  continuing  to 
follow  this  occupation  until  1890.  That  year  he  established  the  business  at 
Ashland,  where  he  conducted  a  general  store  the  rest  of  his  life,  having  a 
thriving  trade.  He  established  himself  among  the  prosperous  business  men  of 
the  borough  as  a  progressive  and  reliable  merchant  and  his  reputation  and 
obliging  service  to  all  his  customers  attracted  a  large  share  of  the  local 
patronage.  Mr.  Hede  was  a  member  of  St.  Joseph's  Catholic  Church  at 
Ashland.    He  died  in  1914. 

GEORGE  K.  ZIMMERMAN  owns  and  operates  a  valuable  farm  in  East 
Bmnswick  township,  acquired  by  persevering  industry  and  thrifty  manage- 
ment. He  settled  there  about  fifteen  years  ago  and  began  modestly,  renting 
the  property  for  five  years  before  he  purchased  it,  and  he  has  made  his  ^yay 
by  honest  labor  which  has  won  him  respect  as  well  as  prosperity.  Mr.  Zim- 
merman is  up-to-date  in  his  agricultural  operations,  is  an  all-around  mechanic 
of  practical  ability,  and  is  typically  German  in  his  thoroughness  and  regard 

for  details.  .         ^  t^        .     /-  u 

John  D.  Zimmerman,  his  father,  was  a  native  of  Prussia,  Germany,  born 


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812  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

July  22,  1823,  and  emigrated  to  this  country  when  a  young  man.  Here  he 
learned  the  wheelwright's  trade.  Making  a  return  visit  to  Germany,  the  ship 
he  sailed  in  was  wrecked  and  he  lost  everything  he  had  with  the  exception 
of  the  clothes  he  wore.  He  married  in  the  old  country  and  came  back  to 
America,  settling  at  Leesport,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  where  he  followed  his  trade. 
When  his  son  George  was  about  eight  years  old  he  left  Leesport  for  South 
Manheim  township  (Jefferson),  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  there  worked  at  his 
trade  for  John  M.  Kauffman,  iron  master,  for  many  years.  He  also  owned 
a  farm  of  thirty-seven  and  a  half  acres  which  he  operated  in  connection  with 
work  at  his  trade,  until  his  children  were  able  to  look  after  it.  He  cleared 
quite  a  portion  of  that  tract.  When  he  became  too  old  to  work  he  sold  his 
farm  and  bought  the  house  and  small  patch  of  ground  where  he  spent  his  few 
remaining  years  in  retirement.  Mr.  Zimmerman  nwrried  Anna  Julianna 
Knieream,  who  died  in  1870,  aged  forty-seven  years,  the  mother  of  the  fol- 
lowing children :  William  K.  married  Devilla  Dry ;  George  K.  is  next  in  the 
family;  Christianna  married  James  Zulick  and  after  his  death  (second)  How- 
ard Klahr;  John  married  Mary  Shotts;  Levi  died  when  fourteen  years  old; 
Clara  married  Harry  Peifer;  sev^eral  died  in  infancy.  The  father  survived 
the  mother  many  years,  passing  away  Dec.  4,  1904.  He  is  buried  at  Auburn, 
she  at  Summer  Hill.  Politically  he  was  a  Democrat,  and  he  served  his  town- 
ship as  supervisor.  His  religious  connection  was  with  St.  Paul's  Reformed 
Church  at  Summer  Hill,  in  Sbuth  Manheim  township,  which  he  served  as 
deacon. 

George  K.  Zimmerman  was  born  June  19,  1856,  at  Leesport,  Berks  Co., 
Pa.  He  attended  school  in  South  Manheim  township  and  worked  for  his 
father  until  sixteen  years  old,  when  he  learned  shoemaking  with  John  S.  Heim, 
in  that  township,  working  for  him  seven  years.  Going  to  Miami  county, 
Ind.,  he  did  farm  work  for  Joseph  Fisher  and  a  Mr.  Dewalt,  and  also  fol- 
lowed his  trade  at  Peru,  same  county,  during  the  year  he  remained  there.  In 
the  fall  of  1879  he  came  back  to  South  Manheim  township,  and  followed 
his  trade  until  his  marriage  in  the  spring  of  1880.  Thereafter  he  worked  at 
his  trade  in  Browerstown,  South  Manheim  township,  for  sixteen  years,  having 
a  house  and  one  and  a  quarter  acres  of  land,  his  shop  in  the  basement  of  the 
dwelling.  For  one  year  he  then  worked  as  a  farm  laborer  for  Mrs.  Sarah 
Heim,  until  he  moved  to  Drehersville,  in  East  Brunswick  township,  and  rented 
the  Nathan  Kindt  farm  for  four  years.  Then  he  removed  to  his  present  place, 
and  tenanted  it  for  five  years,  for  Jonathan  Horn,  before  he  bought  the  farm, 
which  he  is  still  operating.  Mr.  Zimmerman  has  almost  two  hundred  acres, 
of  which  150  acres  are  cleared,  and  he.  has  made  many  improvements  on  the 
place  during  his  ownership.  Most  of  the  land  is  devoted  to  general  faitoing, 
with  about  four  acres  in  garden  truck  for  which  Mr.  Zimmerman  finds  a 
profitable  sale,  marketing  to  Palo  Alto  and  Port  Carbon  once  a  week  in 
winter  and  twice  a  week  in  the  summer  season.  He  built  a  story  to  his  spring- 
house,  where  he  still  carries  on  shoemaking  at  odd  times,  and  as  he  is  pro-» 
ficient  at  other  trades  also  he  is  busily  occupied.  He  has  a  working  knowledge 
of  several  useful  callings.  He.  learned  the  carpenter's  trade  with  Percival 
Henne,  serving  a  three  years'  apprenticeship,  and  still  follows  it  occasionally. 
He  learned  the  painting  trade  with  his  brother  John,  and  has  found  all  these 
serviceable  in  the  various  channels  into  which  his  energy  has  gone.  He  has 
a  threshing  outfit  and  goes  out  among  the  farmers  to  thresh;  has  a  fodder 
cutter  which  he  uses  the  same  way ;  owns  and  operates  a  circular  saw,  cutting 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  813 

firewood  for  the  farmers;  and  for  twenty-five  years  butchered  among  the 
neighboring  farmers,  until  three  years  ago.  The  work  of  improving  his  own 
place  has  gone  forward  steadily,  and  he  has  erected  a  number  of  convenient 
out-buildings.  Mr.  Zimmerman  has  also  exerted  himself  in  local  public 
improvements.  He  held  the  office  of  supervisor  six  years  and  was  school 
director  two  terms,  during  one  term  serving  as  secretary  of  the  board.  Though 
now  independent  in  politics  he  was  a  Democrat  in  his  earlier  years  and  quite 
active  in  the  party,  acting  as  delegate  for  South  Manheim  township  to  county 
conventions  held  at  Pottsville  and  Minersville. 

At  one  time  Mr.  Zimmerman  was  a  member  of  Washington  Camp  No.  45, 
P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  at  Auburn,  is  a  past  president,  and  has  been  representative  to 
the  State  Camp;  he  belonged  to  Protection  Council,  No.  935,  Order  of  Inde- 
pendent Americans,  McKeansburg,  and  was  councilor  three  terms ;  is  a  member 
and  past  councilor  of  Pilgrim  Council,  No.  18,  Daughters  of  America,  at 
McKeansburg,  and  secretary  of  that  lodge  at  present;  a  member  of  McKeans- 
burg Grange,  No.  1256,  Patrons  of  Husbandry,  and  was  at  one  time  chaplain; 
and  for  two  years  he  was  a  member  of  the  Pittsburgh  Pension  Life  Associa- 
tion. He  started  the  Sunday  school  at  Browerstown,  in  South  Manheim  town- 
ship, acted  as  superintendent,  and  assisted  in  the  purchase  of  the  organ.  His 
church  connection  is  with  Christ  Reformed  congregation  at  McKeansburg, 
which  he  served  as  deacon  for  two  years.  His  wife  is  a  member  of  Christ 
Lutheran  Church,  McKeansburg. 

At  Schuylkill  Haven  Mr.  Zimmerman  married  Katie  Ann  Fichthom,  who 
was  bom  in  Upper  Bern  township,  Berks  Co.,  Pa.,  July  28,  1861,  and  was 
educated  in  the  district  schools.  Children  as  follows  have  been  bom  to  them : 
Mary  Eva  married  Edward  Seaman;  Lucy  Ann  married  Harvey  Kimmel; 
Katie  Ann  married  Fred  Seaman ;  John  Adam  married  Rosie  Kunkle ;  George 
Franklin  is  unmarried;  William  Henry  is  unmarried;  Lillie  May  married 
John  G.  Reber ;  Albert  Nathaniel  is  next  in  the  family ;  three  died  m  infancy 
unnamed;  Edward  Levi,  Ida  May,  Wesley,  Sarah  Matilda,  Bertha  and  Walter 
Roosevelt  complete  the  family. 

Jacob  Fichthom,  father  of  Mrs.  Zimmerman,  was  bom  in  Upper  Bem 
township,  Berks  county,  and  was  a  farmer  all  his  life,  having  a  tract  of  sixty- 
four  acres.  He  married  Eva  HoUenbach,  a  native  of  Berks  county,  and  they 
had  children:  Franklin;  Matilda,  Mrs.  Charles  Berger;  Sarah;  Nathaniel, 
who  married  Kate  Baltzer;  Katie  Ann;  and  one  that  died  in  infancy.  The 
father  died  when  eighty-six  years  old,  the  mother  at  the  age  of  sixty-five,  and 
they  are  buried  at  St.  Michael's  Church  in  Tilden  township,  Berks  county.  He 
was  a  member  of  that  church,  and  a  Democrat  in  politics.      , 

PETER  L.  HOFFMAN,  late  of  Brockton,  was  for  many  years  one  of 
the  most  popular  residents  of  his  part  of  Schuylkill  county.  Though  esteemed 
for  his  honorable  and  successful  business  career,  it  was  not  that  alone  which 
made  him  so  valued  a  citizen,  but  the  qualities  of  heart  and  intellect  which 
endeared  him  to  an  unusually  wide  circle  of  friends  and  acquaintances.  With 
intelligence  and  progressive  ideas  beyond  the  average,  he  used  his  powers  and 
influence  in  behalf  of  the  general  good  so  freely  that  his  unselfish  public  spirit 
came  to  be  regarded  as  one  of  the  strongest  assets  of  the  enterprising  element 
in  the  community,  and  his  recent  death  was  mourned  as  a  personal  loss  by  a 
large  number  of  his  fellow  townsmen. 

Mr.  Hoflfman  was  bom  at  Brockton,  Nov.  9,  i860,  and  was  of  German 


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814  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

extraction,  his  father,  Nicholas  Hoffman,  having  been  a  native  of  Germany, 
whence  he  came  to  America  in  young  manhood.  Settling  at  what  was  then 
known  as  Patterson  (now  Brockton),  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  when  the  town  was 
in  its  infancy,  he  engaged  in  the  manufacture  of  cigars  and  also  conducted  a 
hotel,  following  both  branches  of  business  throughout  his  active  years.  He 
died  at  the  age  of  fifty-three  years.  Mr.  Hoffman  was  the  father  of  a  large 
family:  William,  John,  Jacob  and  Frank  are  all  deceased;  Michael  lives  at 
Newkirk,  Schuylkill  county;  Peter  L.  is  deceased;  Mary  is  the  wife  of  Albert 
Fritz ;  Elizabeth  married  Peter  Post ;  Gertrude  is  the  widow  of  Harry  Focht 
who  was  superintendent  of  the  Pencoyd  Iron  Works  at  Manayunk,  near 
Philadelphia;  Catherine  married  Joseph  Bosler;  Lena  married  Jacob  Hartz; 
Matilda  married  Willis  Pamell,  an  attorney,  who  is  a  member  of  the  Schuylkill 
county  bar  and  resides  at  Brockton. 

Peter  L.  Hoffman  grew  up  at  Brockton,  attending  the  local  public  schools 
in  his  boyhood.  He  had  very  good  educational  advantages,  going  to  school 
until  he  was  twenty-one  years  old,  and  his  studies  included  a  course  at  the 
Eastman  Business  College,  Poughkeepsie,  N.  Y.  Then  he  became  interested 
with  his  father  in  the  manufacture  of  cigars  at  Brockton,  and  after  his  father's 
death  he  and  his  brother  William  continued  the  business  for  a  time,  Peter  L. 
Hoffman  subsequently  carrying  it  on  alone.  He  also  operated  the  hotel  which 
his  father  had  established,  and  which  is  still  owned  in^the  family,  and  under 
his  management  it  gained  added  prestige,  his  conformity  to  modem  ideas  and 
faculty  for  pleasing  his  guests  drawing  many  new  patrons  and  giving  increased 
satisfaction  to  the  old  ones.  Mr.  Hoffman  was  always  a  student,  and  his 
library  included  a  number  of  rare  books  as  well  as  standard  works  of  recog- 
nized worth.  He  had  a  reflective  turn  of  mind  and  a  gift  for  writing,  and 
contributed  a  number  of  articles  to  the  local  press,  which  were  always  accept- 
able and  sure  of  interested  readers.  His  interest  in  education  led  him  to 
take  an  active  part  in  securing  the  best  possible  advantages  for  his  community, 
and  for  sixteen  years  he  was  on  the  school  board  of  Schuylkill  township, 
filling  all  the  offices  of  that  body  with  characteristic  ability.  He  built  the  first 
schoolhouse  at  Maryd.  For  several  years  Mr.  Hoffman  also  ser\^ed  as  town- 
ship tax  collector,  in  fact,  he  was  never  defeated  as  a  candidate  for  local  office. 
But  in  his  later  years  he  refused  all  such  honors,  though  he  never  relinquished 
his  support  and  encouragement  to  all  good  movements.  Politically  he  was  a 
Democrat  in  opinion.  His  place  in  the  community  can  never  be  filled,  and 
his  death,  which  occurred  June  3,  191 5,  was  considered  a  public  bereavement. 
He  is  buried  at  Brockton. 

*  Mr.  Hoffman  was  married  to  Lena  Brachman,  daughter  of  Frederick  W. 
Brachman,  late  of  Brockton,  and  she  passed  away  March  5,  1896.  They  are 
survived  by  two  daughters:  Maud  E.  and  Ruth  M.  They  reside  at  the  old 
homestead  and  continue  to  conduct  the  hotel,  for  which  Miss  Maud  E.  Hoff- 
man now  holds  the  license.  There  are  thirty  acres  of  land  in  connection  with 
the  hotel  property. 

HARRY  M.  MICHAEL,  of  Quakake,  Schuylkill  county,  is  a  prosperous 
merchant,  commanding  a  good  share  of  the  patronage  in  his  town  and  adjacent 
territory.  His  business  has  been  built  up  by  conscientious  attention  to  the 
wants  of  his  customers,  and  has  grown  steadily  from  the  beginning,  his  store 
being  now  one  of  the  most  popular  trading  places  in  that  section. 

Mr.   Michael  was  bom   Sept.  23,   1875,  at  Beaver  Valley,  in  Columbia 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  815 

county,  Pa.,  and  belongs  to  an  old  family  of  that  section,  where  it  is  traced 
back  for  several  generations.  Ulrich  Michael  was  bom  in  Columbia  county, 
where  he  spent  his  honorable  life  engaged  in  agricultural  pursuits,  and  there 
he  died. 

Adam  Michael,  son  of  Ulrich  Michael,  was  bom  at  Beaver  Valley,  Columbia 
Co.,  Pa.  In  addition  to  operating  a  farm  of  350  acres  in  Beaver  township 
he  conducted  a  hotel  at  Siunmerhill,  same  county,  for  a  number  of  years,  until 
his  death.  He  nnarried  a  Miss  Hotz,  and  their  children  were:  Manasseh; 
Charles,  who  married  twice,  both  his  wives  being  members  of  the  Hosier 
family;  George  Washington,  who  married  a  Miss  Beaver;  Andrew,  who 
married  Rebecca  Gensel ;  John,  who  died  at  the  age  of  twelve  years ;  Stephen, 
who  married  Sarah  Gensel;  Mrs.  Peter  Houck;  Mrs.  Benjamin  Houck  (one 
of  these  two  daughters  was  named  Sallie)  ;  Elizabeth,  now  deceased,  who 
married  Elias  Miller;  and  Caroline,  who  married  Michael  Hunts.  Adam 
Michael  was  a  Democrat  and  held  a  number  of  the  township  offices.  He  was 
a  consistent  member  of  the  German  Lutheran  Church.  He  died  in  1841,  when 
about  fifty-seven  years  old,  and  with  his  wife,  who  passed  away  several  years 
later,  is  buried  in  a  private  graveyard  on  the  edge  of  the  farm  he  owned  in 
Beaver  valley. 

Manasseh  Michael,  son  of  Adam  Michael,  was  born  in  Beaver  township, 
Columbia  county,  and  lived  with  his  parents  until  he  reached  manhood.  Then 
he  moved  to  Berks  county.  Pa.,  where  he  married.  He  was  a  boatman  on 
the  Schuylkill  canal,  having  his  own  boat,  and  was  engaged  in  carrying  coal 
from  the  vicinity  of  Pottsville  to  Philadelphia  until  he  met  with  an  accident, 
a  piece  of  timber  falling  on  him.  He  lingered  for  nine  years,  dying  in  Decem- 
ber, 1838,  at  the  early  age  of  thirty-seven,  in  Berks  county,  and  he  is  buried 
there,  at  Strausstown,  in  the  Michael  Church  cemetery  in  Bem  township. 
H^  married  Susanna  Hossler  (or  Hosier),  member  of  a  well  known  family 
of  Berks  county  who  had  extensive  farming  interests,  and  they  had  children 
as  follows:  Levi;  William,  a  miller,  who  died  near  Allentown,  Pa.  (he  was 
in  the  Civil  war  for  three  years)  ;  Manassah,  who  was  in  the  hotel  business 
and  died  at  Pottsville,  Pa.;  Ebezine,  widow  of  Josiah  Johnscwi,  residing  on 
Penn  street  in  Reading,  Pa.;  Lucy  Ann,  whoi  married  Thomas  Shuman,  a 
merchant  at  Beaver  Valley;  and  Angeline,  Mrs.  Franklin  L.  Shuman,  of 
Catawissa,  Columbia  Co.,  Pa.  About  1850  the  widowed  mother  removed  with 
her  family  to  Columbia  county,  settling  in  Beaver  township,  where  she  died 
Feb.  16,  1884.  She  is  buried  in  St.  Peter's  Church  yard  (Harger  cemetery), 
in  that  section. 

Levi  Michael,  son  of  Manasseh,  was  bom  in  Berks  county,  where  he  spent 
his  early  years,  but  most  of  his  life  was  passed  in  Columbia  county.  He  Avas 
a  merchant  in  Beaver  township  and  well  known  in  that  vicinity,  where  he  died 
in  1914,  at  the  age  of  eighty-two  years.  He  is  buried  in  Beaver  township. 
He  was  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  war,  in  which  he  served  three  years,  having 
enlisted  from  Pottsville  in  Company  H,  17th  Pennsylvania  Cavalry.  He 
married  Annie  Jane  Gearhart,  who  died  when  sixty-one  years  old.  The 
following  children  were  bom  to  them:  Harry  M.,  Alfred  L.,  Gertmde, 
George,  Lottie,  Norman,  Robert,  Jennie  and  Russell. 

Harry  M.  Michael  received  his  education  in  the  public  schools  and  was 
only  a  boy  when  he  mastered  telegraphy,  taking  the  night  turn  at  the  Quakake 
station  when  he  was  but  fourteen  years  old.  He  held  it  for  four  years,  at 
the  end  of  which  time  he  was  transferred  to  the   Beaver  Valley  station, 


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816  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

remaining  there  three  years.  He  was  next  at  Hazleton  Junction,  for  two 
and  a  half  years,  until  appointed  station  agent  at  Brandonville,  where  he  was 
located  for  two  years.  Thence  he  changed  to  Ashland,  where  he  was  ticket 
agent  for  three  years,  until  his  removal  to  Quakake,  in  1903.  Here  he  opened 
the  general  store  which  he  has  since  carried  on,  and  which  is  well  stocked 
with  the  lines  in  demand,  Mr.  Michael  taking  great  pains  to  fill  the  wants  of 
all  his  customers.  Honorable  and  reliable  in  all  his  transactions,  and  possessing 
good  executive  ability,  he  has  handled  the  business  well  and  deserves  the 
prosperity  which  has  rewarded  him.  He  stands  high  in  the  regard  of  his 
fellow  citizens,  who  have  chosen  him  to  the  office  of  road  treasurer,  which  he 
filled  for  five  years.  He  is  a  member  of  the  Brotherhood  and  the  Improved 
Order  of  Heptasophs,  and  takes  an  active  part  in  the  work  of  the  latter 
organization. 

Mr.  Michael  married  Effi«  Eveland,  daughter  of  Edw.  Eveland,  a  black- 
smith, of  Quakake,  and  five  children  have  been  bom  to  them :  Helen ;  Gladys ; 
Charles;  Dorothy,  who  died  when  four  years  old;  and  a  son  that  died  in 
infancy.    The  family  attend  the  Evangelical  Church. 

CHARLES  W.  EISINGER  has  been  a  lifelong  resident  of  SchuylkiU 
county,  having  been  bom  near  Pottsville  Sept.  19,  1S53,  and  most  of  his  life 
has  been  spent  at  Ashland.  He  commenced  his  present  line  of  business  in 
1880,  and  after  ten  years'  experience  at  Port  Carbon  established  himself  at 
Ashland. 

Mr.  Eisinger  is  of  German  extraction.  His  grand-parents  lived  and  died 
in  Germany,  and  his  father.  Christian  Eisinger,  was  bom  in  the  Kingdom  of 
Wurtemberg,  where  he  passed  his  early  years.  When  a  youth  of  sixteen  he 
emigrated  to  America,  and  first  located  at  Minersville,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa., 
later  removing  to  Pottsville,  where  he  was  married.  From  there  he  came  to 
Ashland,  where  he  engaged  in  the  grocery  business  up  to  1898,  that  year 
taking  up  his  residence  in  Philadelphia,  where  he  passed  the  remainder  ot  his 
life.  His  death  occurred  there  in  1906.  Mr.  Eisinger  married  Christiana 
Miller,  a  native  of  Hessen-Darmstadt,  Germany,  whose  parents  died  in  that 
country.  She  came  to  the  United  States  when  a  young  girl  and  Uved  first  at 
Minersville,  Schuylkill  county,  later  removing  to  Pottsville.  She  died  in 
Philadelphia  in  1904.  Eight  children  were  born  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Christian 
Eisinger,  of  whom  Charles  W.  is  the  eldest;  Gussie  is  deceased;  Henrietta  is 
the  wife  of  Edmund  Silber,  of  Philadelphia;  Edward  resides  in  that  city; 
Anna  is  the  wife  of  Otto  Parodat,  of  Philadelphia;  Emma  M.  is  the  wife  of 
Aaron  Motter,  of  Philadelphia;  Louise  died  young;  another  child  died  in 
infancy. 

Charles  W.  Eisinger  was  an  infant  when  his  parents  settled  at  Ashland, 
in  1864.  His  education  was  received  in  the  public  schools  there,  and  as  he 
had  to  commence  work  rather  early  he  attended  night  school  for  some  time. 
Starting  at  the  age  of  fourteen  years  he  was  employed  at  the  collieries  near 
Ashland  until  18&),  in  which  year  he  entered  his  present  line,  which  he  started 
in  the  employ  of  Hebner  &  Paul,  of  Port  Carbon.  He  first  handled  sewing 
machines.  After  ten  years  with  the  firm  mentioned  he  commenced  business 
on  his  own  account  at  Ashland,  and  when  he  considered  there  was  sufficient 
inducement  sold  pianos,  as  well  as  sewing  machines.  He  first  dealt  in  old 
square  pianos,  selling  uprights  after  the  others  became  unpopular,  and  also 
put  in  a  stock  of  smaller  musical  instruments,  handling  graphophones,  phono- 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  817 

graphs,  etc.  Since  dealing  in  musical  instruments  he  has  also  sold  a  number 
of  organs.  Mr.  Eisinger's  first  location  at  Ashland  was  across  the  street  from 
his  present  place,  which  property  he  bought  in  1901.  It  is  at  No.  1609  Centre 
street.  Mr.  Eisinger  has  found  a  profitable  field  of  employment  in  and  around 
Ashland,  and  has  a  large  number  of  well  satisfied  patrons  in  his  territory. 
He  has  not  only  been  devoted  to  business,  but  has  also  interested  himself  in 
the  social  and  other  activities  of  the  borough,  being  a  member  of  the  Royal 
Arcanum  and  the  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  and  he  has  served  as  a  trustee  of  the  local 
camp  of  the  latter  organization.  With  his  wife  he  holds  membership  in  the 
Evangelical  Church  at  Ashland. 

On  Nov.  25,  1886,  Mr.  Eisinger  married  Marie  Christian  Bachman,  daugh- 
ter of  Christian  and  Dorothy  (Friedenberger)  Bachman,  natives  of  Germany. 
Mr.  Bachman  came  to  this  country  at  an  early  day,  settling  in  Tamaqua,  this 
county,  and  died  in  May,  1914.  His  wife  died  in  April,  1903.  Mrs.  Eisinger 
was  born  at  Tamaqua,  the  second  of  a  family  of  five  children,  namely :  Eliza- 
beth, the  wife  of  John  Wittig,  of  Ashland;  Marie  C,  Mrs.  Eisinger;  John, 
of  Pottstown ;  William,  of  Tamaqua ;  and  Louis,  of  Tamaqua. , 

Three  children  have  been  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Eisinger:  Amy,  the  eldest, 
is  deceased ;  Charles  William  is  a  clerk  in  the  Citizens'  National  Bank  of  Ash- 
land ;  Leah  is  at  home. 

LEWIS  JOHN  GRUBE,  of  East  Brunswick  township,  has  led  an  indus- 
trious life  always,  and  is  deservedly  respected  by  his  neighbors  for  the  thrifty 
management  which  has  made  him  one  of  the  prosperous  men  of  the  locality. 
His  various  interests  keep  him  well  occupied.  Mr.  Grube  is  a  typical  repre- 
sentative of  a  family  whose  members  nave  maintained  a  high  reputation 
through  several  generations. 

Christian  Grube,  his  grandfather,  lived  in  the  Province  of  Hanover, 
Germany,  and  was  a  silver  miner  by  occupation.  He  died  at  the  comparatively 
early  age  of  thirty-six,  leaving  a  wife  and  five  children,  namely:  Charles, 
who  died  in  Baltimore  about  1909,  aged  seventy-seven  years;  Charlotte; 
Louisa,  Mrs.  Charles  Heberling;  Dorothy,  Mrs.  John  Weist;  and  William, 
who  was  one  year  old  when  his  father  died.  The  mother,  whose  maiden  name 
was  Hannah  Shear,  was  a  native  of  Hanover,  Germany,  and  died  at  the  age 
of  seventy-seven  years  in  East  Brunswick  township,  Sthuylkill  county,  at  the 
home  of  her  son-in-law,  Charles  Heberling.  She  was  a  member  of  the  German 
Lutheran  Church,  and  is  buried  in  the  Frieden's  Church  cemetery.  Mrs.  Grube 
came  to  America  with  her  children  eighteen  years  after  her  husband's  death, 
the  family  settling  in  Baltimore,  Md.,  for  two  years,  and  removing  thence  to 
Schuylkill  county,  Pennsylvania. 

William  Grube,  son  of  Christian,  was  bom  July  8,  1834,  in  Klausthal, 
Hanover,  Germany,  was  educated  in  his  native  country,  and  came  to  America 
with  his  mother.  They  first  settled  at  Baltimore,  and  later  at  Lewistown,  in 
Walker  township,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa.,  and  he  was  engaged  at  wood  chopping 
for  some  time.  Thence  he  removed  to  East  Brunswick  township,  where  he 
bought  a  farm  of  thirty  acres,  cleared  most  of  it,  and  subsequently  bought 
several'tracts  aggregating  seventy-five  acres.  These  he  cultivated  to  tl|e  end  of 
his  days,  carrying  on  general  farming.  He  died  Oct.  31,  1906,  and  is  buried 
in  the  cemetery  at  Frieden's  Church,  New  Ringgold,  of  which  church  he  was 
a  Lutheran  member.  In  political  sentiment  he  was  a  Democrat.  Mrs.  Grube 
still   resides  in  East  Brunswick  township.     Her  maiden  name  was   Sophia 

Vol.  n— 14 


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818  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

Reidler,  and  she  was  bom  in  Germany  Nov.  3,  1841,  daughter  of  Conrad  and 
Maria  (Knoblauch)  Reidler.  They  had  children  as  follows:  Caroline  married 
George  Schaffer;  Charlotte  married  Charles  Eckroth;  William  married  Cather- 
ine Shellhammer;  Minnie  married  Adam  Schofield,  who  is  deceased;  Lewis 
John  married  Cordelia  Bachert;  Louisa  is  next  in  the  family;  Charles  W. 
married  Emma  L.  Shellhammer;  Katie  married  Harvey  Houser;  Henry  is 
next ;  Walter  married  Elsie  Frantz. 

Lewis  John  Grube  was  bom  Nov.  13,  1869,  ^^  East  Bmnswick  township, 
and  was  educated  there  in  the  local  schools.  He  continued  to  work  on  his 
father's  farm  until  twenty-one  years  of  age,  when  he  left  home  and  entered 
the  employ  of  Wertman  &  Fletcher,  as  a  wood  chopper,  in  Rush  township, 
Schuylkill  county,  for  three  years.  His  next  position  was  with  the  Lehigh 
Valley  Railroad  Company,  as  brakeman  between  Delano  and  Packerton,  and 
he  was  so  engaged  for  three  months,  Hving  in  Quakake  during  that  time.  He 
was  obliged  to  give  up  this  work  on  account  of  illness,  returning  to  his  parents' 
home  in  East  Brunswick  township,  and  was  ill  for  six  months.  His  brother 
William  bought  from  Stephen  Greenawalt  a  tract  of  ninety-eight  acres,  lying 
in  East  Brunswick  township,  and  he  sold  his  brother  Lewis  forty-eight  acres 
and  103  perches  of  this  purchase.  Thirty  acres  of  this  are  under  cultivation, 
Mr.  Grube  following  general  farming  very  profitably.  Part  of  his  time  is 
given  to  the  sawmill  he  owns,  and  which  he  has  been  operating  for  nineteen 
years.  Though  he  leamed  the  business  himself,  acquiring  all  his  experience 
practically,  he  is  very  proficient,  and  saws  considerable  timber  for  the  farmers 
in  -the  surrounding  territory.  He  also  hauls  produce  to  the  town  of  New 
Philadelphia  twice  a  week  in  the  summertime,  and  once  a  week  in  the  winter 
season. 

Mr.  Gmbe  married  Cordelia  Bachert,  who  was  bom  Jan.  10,  1871,  daugh- 
ter of  Elias  and  Hannah  (Merkle)  Bachert,  and  their  first  child  died  in 
infancy;  Hannah  Sophia  was  bom  Sept.  19,  1904;  John  Elias,  Dec.  16,  1906; 
George,  June  16,  1909;  Peter,  Nov.  6,  1910.  The  children  of  school  age  are 
attending  the  Reigel  school  in  East  Bmnswick  township.  Mr.  Gmbe  and  his 
wife  are  members  of  the  Frieden's  Lutheran  Church  at  New  Rii^gold.  He 
votes  the  Democratic  ticket. 

Mrs.  Cordelia  (Bachert)  Gmbe  was  educated  in  what  was  at  that  period 
the  Middle  District  school  of  East  Bmnswick  township,  and  remained  at  home 
until  her  marriage.  She  is  a  great-granddaughter  of  George  Bachert,  an  early 
farmer  and  wheelwright  of  East  Bmnswick  township,  who  lived  to  be  about 
eighty  years  old.  His  children  were :  Jacob,  John,  Henry,  Simon,  Magdalena 
and  Mrs.  John  Faust. 

John  Bachert,  Mrs.  Gmbe's  grandfather,  was  also  a  farmer  in  East 
Bmnswick  township.  He  married  Elizabeth  Zettlemoyer,  and  they  had 
children  as  follows :  Jacob,  Emmanuel,  James,  Daniel,  Elias,  Elizabeth,  Laura, 
Mollie  and  Katie. 

Elias  Bachert,  father  of  Mrs.  Gmbe,  was  bom  Aug.  14,  1843,  ^^  East 
Bmnswick  township,  where  he  is  now  a  prosperous  miller  and  farmer,  one  of 
the  substantial  business  men  in  his  section  of  Schuylkill  county.  Ten  children 
have  been  bom  to  his  marriage  with  Hannah  Merkle :  Albert  Robert,  William 
I.,  Elizabeth,  Cordelia,  John  E.,  Richard  E.,  Howard  J.,  Luther  P.,  Thomas 
W.,  and  Oscar  P.  A  fuller  account  of  the  family  may  be  found  elsewhere  in 
this  work. 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  819 

ALFRED  A.  YEAGER,  of  East  Brunswick  township,  is  now  giving  all 
his  attention  to  farming,  and  has  excellent  prospects  in  that  line.  The  ability 
and  confidence  which  won  him  success  in  his  earlier  ventures  are  just  as 
valuable  in  his  present  business,  and  combined  with  his  practical  early  training 
on  the  farm  should  prove  sufficient  to  insure  prosperity.  So  far  he  has  met 
with  gratifying  results,  and  he  is  sparing  no  pains  to  introduce  the  best 
methods  and  most  approved  systems  into  his  work.  He  is  a  son  of  William 
Yeager  and  grandson  of  George  Yeager,  and  belongs  to  an  old  family  of 
Schuylkill  county. 

George  Yeager,  the  grandfather,  was  a  native  of  Schuylkill  county,  and 
for  many  years  conducted  a  blacksmith  shop  at  Orwigsburg.  He  married  a 
'Miss  Weiss,  and  they  had  the  following  children:  Thomas,  who  married 
Maria  Yeager,  resides  in  Orwigsburg;  George,  deceased,  married  Emma 
Edwards,  who  resides  at  Orwigsburg;  William  is  the  father  of  Alfred  A. 
Yeager.  The  parents  of  this  family  are  buried  in  the  Lutheran  cemetery  at 
Orwigsburg.  The  father  was  a  Democrat,  and  his  religious  connection  was 
with  the  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  of  Orwigsburg,  of  which  he  was  an 
active  member. 

William  Yeager,  father  of  Alfred  A.  Yeager,  was  educated  in  the  schools 
of  Orwigsburg,  and  served  a  thorough  apprenticeship,  at  the  blacksmith's  trade 
in  his  father's  shop.  After  conducting  a  shop  of  his  own  in  Orwigsburg  for 
about  ten  years  he  entered  the  employ  of  the  Philadelphia  &  Reading  Railway 
Company,  in  the  blacksmith  department  of  the  Pottsville  shop,  where  he 
remained  for  the  long  period  of  twenty-nine  years.  He  is  now  leading  a 
retired  life  in  Pottsville,  Pa.  He  is  a  very  skillful  mechanic,  and  in  his  work- 
ing days  was  much  thought  of  by  his  superiors.  Mr.  Yeager  married  Elizabeth 
Deibert,  a  daughter  of  Joseph  Deibert,  whose  wife's  maiden  name  was  Sheep. 
They  have  had  the  following  children :  Alfred  A.  is  mentioned  below ;  William, 
who  is  a  blacksmith  in  the  Pennsylvania  &  Reading  shops,  at  Pottsville, 
married  Laura  Fenstermacher ;  Mamie  married  Henry  Long,  of  Pottsville; 
Ann  married  a  Mr.  Hughes,  of  Pottsville;  Frederick  married  May  Smith,  of 
Pottsville ;  Roy  is  unmarried  and  lives  with  his  parents ;  Maggie  is  next  in  the 
family;  Katie  married  Jacob  Boss,  of  Pottsville;  Joseph  is  deceased.  Mr. 
Yeager  is  now  (191 5)  about  sixty-seven  years  of  age,  his  wife  about  sixty-six. 
They  are  members  of  the  Evangelical  Lutheran  Church,  of  Pottsville.  Mr. 
Yeager  supports  the  Democratic  party. 

Alfred  A.  Yeager  was  bom  April  24,  1868,  in  Orwigsburg,  where  he 
began  his  education  in  the  public  schools.  When  nine  years  old  he  left  home 
and  went  to  his  uncle,  Daniel  Deibert,  with  whom  he  lived  for  one  year, 
after  which  he  lived  with  Joseph  Deibert,  at  Orwigsburg,  for  two  years.  Then 
he  entered  the  employ  of  William  Shoener,  to  work  on  his  farm,  remaining 
with  him  five  years,  at  the  end  of  which  period  he  made  a  change,  working 
on  the  farm  of  Lewis  Shoener  for  two  years.  His  next  place  was  with  James 
Shoener,  as  farm  laborer,  continuing  with  him  in  that  capacity  for  about  one 
year,  when  they  formed  a  partnership  in  the  timber  business.  They  would 
buy  the  timber  by  the  acre,  and  sell  it  to  the  Reading  collieries,  the  Dodson 
Coal  Company  and  individual  collieries,  in  fact  they  dealt  with  all  the  col- 
lieries between  St.  Clair  and  Tuscarora,  the  timber  being  for  use  in  the 
mines.  After  an  association  of  four  years  Mr.  Shoener  died,  and  Mr. 
Yeager  took  over  his  share  in  the  business,  and  conducted  it  alone  during  the 
rest  of  his  connection  with  that  line,  which  extended  to  twenty-seven  yepis. 


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820  SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA 

After  that  he  bought  his  present  farm  of  sixty  acres  in  East  Brunswick  town- 
ship, about  half  of  which  is  under  cultivation.  He  has  made  numerous 
improvements  on  the  property,  now  having  a  very  fine  home  there.  Since  set- 
thng  at  this  place  he  has  bought  two  other  tracts  adjoining  the  original  pur- 
chase, one  containing  sixty,  acres,  of  which  forty  acres  are  cleared,  the  other 
comprising  113  acres,  of  which  seventy-five  are  cleared.  Mr.  Yeager  culti- 
vates these  three  tracts  and  has  been  very  successful  in  his  agricultural  work, 
being  considered  one  of  the  leading  farmers  of  his  section.  He  is  interested 
in  everything  affecting  the  welfare  and  social  conditions  of  his  locality,  has 
joined  a  number  of  his  neighbors  as  a  member  of  Protection  Council,  No.  935, 
Independent  Order  of  Americans,  at  McKeansburg,  and  belongs  to  Wash- 
ington Camp  No.  100,  P.  O.  S.  of  A.,  at  New  Ringgold.  He  attends  the 
Evangelical  Lutheran  Church  at  Orwigsburg  and  contributes  regularly  to  its 
support.    On  political  questions  he  is  a  Republican. 

By  his  marriage  to  Laura  E.  Wertman  Mr.  Yeager  has  had  six  children: 
Edward  William,  bom  Sept.  7,  1902,  died  when  ten  months  old;  Samuel 
Lewis,  bom  May  25,  1904,  died  when  four  days  less  than  fifteen  months  old; 
Bertell  Marie  was  bom  Dec.  11,  1905;  Evelyn  Emma,  Dec.  10,  1907;  LuVeme 
Estella,  July  24,  191 1 ;  Madeline  Laura,  Jan.  29,  1914. 

Mrs.  Laura  E.  (Wertman)  Yeager  was  bom  in  West  Penn  township, 
Schuylkill  county,  Aug.  26,  1871,  daughter  of  Samuel  D.  Wertman,  and  grand- 
daughter of  Samuel  Wertman.  The  grandfather  was  a  successful  fanner 
in  West  Penn  township,  where  he  owned  a  large  tract  of  land  and  con- 
ducted a  farming  business  the  greater  portion  of  his  life.  He  married  Eliz- 
abeth Daubenspeck,  and  they  had  children  as  follows:  Samuel  D.  is  the 
father  of  Mrs.  Yeager;  David  married  Catherine  Fritz;  Jonas  married  Mary 
Roth;  Elias  married  Kate  Boyer,  and  both  are  deceased;  Elizabeth,  deceased, 
was  the  wife  of  Henry  Mimm;  Sarah  married  Joseph  Wertman,  of  Walnut- 
port;  Mary,  deceased,  married  George  Alspach;  Polly  married  Hiram  Gobel. 
The  parents  were  associated  with  the  Methodist  Church.  The  father  is  buried 
near  Allentown,  Pa.,  the  mother  in  Zion*s  cemetery,  in  West  Penn  township. 

Samuel  D.  Wertman,  father  of  Mrs.  Yeager,  was  educated  in  the  schools 
of  West  Penn  township,  and  worked  on  his  father's  farm  until  he  was  twenty- 
five  years  of  age,  after  which  he  hired  ou^  as  a  farm  laborer  for  a  few  years. 
Then  he  bought  a  tract  of  seventy-five  acres  near  West  Penn  station,  and  in 
connection  with  farming  he  formerly  had  charcoal  ovens  on  his  property, 
cutting  the  timber  from  his  trees  and  burning  charcoal,  which  he  hauled 
from  West  Penn  station  to  the  powder  mills,  the  Muir  mills  at  St.  Clair 
and  the  Weldy  powder  mills  at  Mintzers.  He  also  bought  charcoal  from 
his  neighbors  and  hauled  it  to  the  mills,  carrying  on  that  business  for 
about  ten  years.  Besides,  he  cut  timber  on  his  land  and  shipped  the  same 
to  the  collieries  of  the  Lehigh  Valley  Railroad  Company,  and  hauled  railroad 
ties  for  the  Slatington  &  Lehigh  Railroad  Company.  He  now  owns  about 
four  hundred  acres  of  land,  a  great  portion  of  which  is  in  timber.  Mr.  Wert- 
man is  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  war,  having  joined  the  48th  Pennsylvania  Regi- 
ment for  nine  months*  service;  he  received  an  honorable  discharge  at  Har- 
risburg.  Mr.  Wertman  has  been  a  leading  member  of  Zion's  Evangelical 
Lutheran  Church,  of  West  Penn  township,  and  has  held  the  offices  of  elder 
and  deacon.  Politically  he  works  with  the  Democratic  party,  and  has  served 
as  judge  of  election. 

Mrs.  Wertman  was  Maria  Bebleheimer,  daughter  of  George  and  Elizabeth 


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SCHUYLKILL  COUNTY,  PENNSYLVANIA  821 

(Yeager)  Bebleheimer,  natives  of  Orwigsburg.  Mrs.  Wertman  died  when 
sixty-two  years  old,  and  is  buried  in  Zion*s  churchyard.  Children  as  follows 
were  bom  to  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Wertman:  Ellen  died  aged  three  years;  Dr.  Sam- 
uel E.  married  Lizzie  Fox,  and  they  reside  in  Mahanoy  City;  Clinton  died 
aged  three  years;  Laura  E.  is  Mrs.  Yeager;  Mary  married  Oliver  K.  Mantz, 
who  is  proprietor  of  the  West  Penn  Hotel;  Emma  is  a  school  teacher  in  West 
Penn  township;  Dr.  Mahlon  married  Lizzie  FoUweiler,  and  they  reside  at 
Palmerton,  Pa. ;  Sarah  and  George  are  at  home ;  Stella  is  a  school  teacher  in 
West  Bnmswick  township;  Qarence  and  Christie  Belle  are  at  home;  Minnie 
C.  is  the  widow  of  Irwin  Lotz,  and  is  living  at  home. 

GEORGE  YOUNG,  a  retired  merchant  of  Ashland,  Schuylkill  Co.,  Pa., 
was  bom  in  Germany  April  2*],  183 1,  son  of  Peter  and  Mary  Young.  The 
parents  died  in  Germany. 

Mr.  Young  was  educated  in  the  German  schools  and  came  to  America  in 
1852,  landing  at  New  York  on  June  27th.  That  year  he  was  married  to  Mary 
Ripplinger,  who  came  from  the  same  part  of  Germany,  and  they  started  for 
America  immediately  after  the  wedding.  Going  to  Patterson,  Schuylkill  Co., 
Pa.,  Mr.  Young  remained  there  until  1855,  when  he  removed  to  St.  Clair,  and 
thence  to  Ashland.  At  the  latter  place  he  entered  the  mines,  and  remained  at 
that  work  for  forty  years.  About  1886  he  engaged  in  business  on  his  own 
account  at  Ashland. 

Mr.  and  Mrs.  Young  have  had  children  as  follows :  Lena,  the  widow  of 
George  Steinfeldt,  residing  in  Ashland;  John,  also  residing  in  Ashland; 
Charles  and  Elizabeth,  twins  (he  resides  at  Oakland,  and  she  is  deceased)  ; 
Peter,  who  resides  in  Ashland;  Mary,  deceased;  and  Joseph,  a  resident  of 
Ashland,  where  he  is  engaged  in  business.  Mr.  Young  and  his  family  are 
members  of  St.  Mauritius'  Roman  Catholic  Church,  of  Ashland. 

EARL  D.  BAUM,  of  Middleport,  has  the  only  manufacturing  business  con- 
ducted in  that  borough,  and  as  it  gives  employment  to  a  considerable  number 
of  hands  its  success  will  augment  the  resources  of  the  town  appreciably.  The 
proprietor  is  one  of  the  youngest  business  men  there,  and  he  has  the  good 
wishes  of  the  community  in  his  enterprise,  which  promises  well. 

Mr.  Batrni  is  a  son  of  William  Baum  and  a  grandson  of  Benneville  Baum, 
who  lived  in  the  Mahanoy  valley  in  Schuylkill  county,  where  he  followed 
fanning.  Later  he  removed  to  Valley  View,  this  county,  at  which  place  he 
died. 

William  Baum,  father  of  Earl  D.  Baum,  was  engaged  in  farming  during 
his  early  life,  but  for  many  years  he  has  been  a  mine  worker,  having  followed 
that  occupation  at  Brookside  and  Goodspring,  this  county.  His  home  is  at 
H^ns.  He  married  Agnes  Shirey,  daughter  of  the  late  Daniel  C.  Shirey, 
who  represented  Schuylkill  county  in  the  State  House  of  Representatives, 
was  a  veteran  of  the  Civil  war,  and  died  in  Deep  Creek  valley,  this  county. 
To  Mr.  and  Mrs.  William  Baum  have  been  bom  five  children :  Vemie,  Earl 
D.,  Agnes,  Charles  and  Bertram. 

Eari  D.  Baum  was  born  Oct.  i,  1895,  at  Hegins,  Schuylkill  county,  where 
he  obtained  his  education  in  the  public  schools.  From  boyhood  he  has  been 
employed  in  the  shirt  manufacturing  business,  gaining  his  first  experience  in 
that  line  in  the  shirt  factory  at  Hegins,  where  he  remained  for  three  years. 
Tben  he  went  to  Pillow,  Pa.,  there  establishing  a  shirt  facto